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Full-Text Articles in Law

Taking Slippage Seriously: Noncompliance And Creative Compliance In Environmental Law, Daniel A. Farber Jan 1999

Taking Slippage Seriously: Noncompliance And Creative Compliance In Environmental Law, Daniel A. Farber

Faculty Scholarship

Environmental law is examined in light of the slippage between regulatory standards and the actual conduct of regulated parties. Two forms of slippage are identified: negative, which describes the situation where something that is legally mandated to happen fails to happen; and affirmative, which describes the situation where required standards are renegotiated rather than ignored. This concept of slippage is explored in terms of how it might inform discussions of legal doctrine, environmental policy, and environmental pedagogy. Slippage is good in the context that it can ameliorate the sometimes impractical demands found in statues, and bad in the context that ...


The Benefits And Risks Of Going It Alone, Michael B. Gerrard Jan 1999

The Benefits And Risks Of Going It Alone, Michael B. Gerrard

Faculty Scholarship

Brownfield projects are essentially real estate developments with a twist, and the old real estate adage certainly applies: "Location, location, location." But if time is the fourth dimension, then time is also the fourth element in a successful brownfield project – preferably, spending as little of it as possible.

The timing of standard governmental cleanup processes is simply incompatible with many kinds of real estate projects. Forget about cleanups of National Priorities List (NPL) sites under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Contingency Plan (NCP); those take on average almost twenty years to complete. But even many state voluntary ...


The Past, Present And Future Of Title Vi Of The Civil Rights Act As A Tool Of Environmental Justice, Michael B. Gerrard, Nicholas Johnson, Peggy Shepard, Melva J. Hayden, Sheila Foster, Elizabeth Georges Jan 1999

The Past, Present And Future Of Title Vi Of The Civil Rights Act As A Tool Of Environmental Justice, Michael B. Gerrard, Nicholas Johnson, Peggy Shepard, Melva J. Hayden, Sheila Foster, Elizabeth Georges

Faculty Scholarship

Mr. Michael Gerrard: I am going to try to do something a little unconventional. After hearing some remarks from Professor Johnson, I will try to start a dialogue. I have been requested to ask very tough questions of our panelists, so I will do that in the hope of drawing all of you in the audience into the dialogue. First, we will hear some remarks from Professor Nicholas Johnson of Fordham University School of Law.


Reinventing Environmental Regulation Through The Government Performance And Results Act: Are The States Ready For The Devolution?, Rena I. Steinzor Jan 1999

Reinventing Environmental Regulation Through The Government Performance And Results Act: Are The States Ready For The Devolution?, Rena I. Steinzor

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Intermediate Sanctions: Controlling The Tax-Exempt Organization Manager, Alex Ritchie Jan 1999

Intermediate Sanctions: Controlling The Tax-Exempt Organization Manager, Alex Ritchie

Faculty Scholarship

On August 4, 1988, the Department of the Treasury issued proposed intermediate sanctions regulations that allow the Internal Revenue Service to impose significant excise taxes on executives of tax-exempt organizations who receive compensation in excess of reasonable compensation or in excess of amounts that would ordinarily be paid for like services by like enterprises. Exempt organization theory holds that government provides a tax exemption to further social goals, but those goals are frustrated when management has conflicting incentives. In a for-profit entity, management and firm owners have conflicting goals when control is separated from ownership, but in a tax-exempt entity ...