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Symposium: Building The Arc Of Justice: The Life And Legal Thought Of Derrick Bell: Foreword, Matthew H. Charity Jan 2014

Symposium: Building The Arc Of Justice: The Life And Legal Thought Of Derrick Bell: Foreword, Matthew H. Charity

Faculty Scholarship

The four articles in this Symposium issue pay tribute to the work of Professor Derrick Bell by building on his challenges to the permanence of racial domination, to the potential limitations of good will inherent in the concept of interest convergence, and to the question of permanence not just of racism, but of other systemic biases since recognized, written on, and litigated. The articles range from the 19th century to the hegemonic war on terror, from Latin identity as a disruptive force, to recognition of subjugated identities allowing for the creation of coalitions to end oppression.


Reforming Property Law To Address Devastating Land Loss, Thomas W. Mitchell Jan 2014

Reforming Property Law To Address Devastating Land Loss, Thomas W. Mitchell

Faculty Scholarship

Tenancy-in-common ownership represents the most widespread form of common ownership of real property in the United States. Such ownership under the default rules also represents the most unstable ownership of real property in this country. Thousands of tenancy-in-common property owners, including members of many poor and minority families, have lost their commonly-owned property due to court-ordered, forced partition sales as well as much of their real estate wealth associated with such ownership as a result of such sales. Though some scholars and the media have highlighted how thousands of African-Americans have lost an untold amount of property and substantial real ...


Exploration Of The Efficacy Of Class-Based Approaches To Racial Justice: The Cuban Context, An Latcrit Iv Symposium - Rotating Centers, Epanding Frontiers: Theory And Marginal Intersections- Forging Our Identity: Transformative Resistance In The Areas Of Work, Class, And The Law, Tanya Kateri Hernandez Jan 2000

Exploration Of The Efficacy Of Class-Based Approaches To Racial Justice: The Cuban Context, An Latcrit Iv Symposium - Rotating Centers, Epanding Frontiers: Theory And Marginal Intersections- Forging Our Identity: Transformative Resistance In The Areas Of Work, Class, And The Law, Tanya Kateri Hernandez

Faculty Scholarship

The growing discord over the continuing use of race-conscious social justice programs in the United States has given rise to the consideration of replacing them with color-blind class-based affirmative action programs. Although there are a number of theoretical investigations into the proposal for class-based affirmative action, the discourse is short on practical assessments. This Article amplifies the class-based affirmative action debate by drawing lessons from Socialist Cuba's socioeconomic redistribution measures. Inasmuch as Socialist Cuba attempts to diminish racial disparities with the use of colorblind socioeconomic redistribution programs one can classify their strategy as a class-focused rather than a race-focused ...