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Full-Text Articles in Law

Online And "As Is", Colin P. Marks Jan 2018

Online And "As Is", Colin P. Marks

Faculty Articles

Online retail is a multi-billion-dollar industry in the United States. Consumers enjoy the ease with which they can browse, click, and order goods from the comfort of their own homes. Though it may come as no surprise to most lawyers, retailers are taking advantage of online transactions by attaching additional terms and conditions that one would not normally find in-store. Some of these conditions are logical limitations on the use of the retailers' websites, but others go much further, limiting consumers' rights in ways that would surprise many shoppers. In particular, many online retailers use these terms to limit implied ...


Entrada: Slavery, Religion And Reconciliation,, Bill Piatt Jan 2018

Entrada: Slavery, Religion And Reconciliation,, Bill Piatt

Faculty Articles

Each year, Santa Fe, NM celebrates a Fiesta. One component, the Entrada, celebrate the "peaceful" re-conquest of the Indigenous people by the Spanish colonizers. Controversy has arisen in recent years as activists challenge the memorialization of a tradition that they feel represents slavery and brutality. Linking their struggle to recent efforts to remove memorials to the Confederacy, they have sought to physically block the re-enactment, leading to arrests, collateral conflict, and the threat of future violence.How do we move forward as a society with the legacy of slavery that built this region and country: This article examines the historical ...


The Cfpb Proposed Arbitration Ban, The Rule, The Data, And Some Considerations For Change, Ramona L. Lampley May 2017

The Cfpb Proposed Arbitration Ban, The Rule, The Data, And Some Considerations For Change, Ramona L. Lampley

Faculty Articles

Predispute consumer arbitration has sparked energetic debate and sharply divides the utility of the class action versus the utility of individual arbitration. Thus far, the U.S. Supreme Court’s jurisprudence has given a “thumbs up” approach to predispute consumer arbitration waivers, which almost always include a class waiver agreement. Congress showed little interest in amending the Federal Arbitration Act (“FAA”), even for consumer cases. It seems that consumer arbitration was the “wild west” of the law, in that it was largely unregulated and could direct claims to the black hole of private dispute resolution. In May 2016, the Consumer ...


¡Que Viva The Scholar!, Bill Piatt Jan 2017

¡Que Viva The Scholar!, Bill Piatt

Faculty Articles

This piece congratulates The Scholar on their 20th anniversary and explains some of the impetus involved with the journal's beginnings.


Reforming Military Justice: An Analysis Of The Military Justice Act Of 2016, David A. Schlueter Jan 2017

Reforming Military Justice: An Analysis Of The Military Justice Act Of 2016, David A. Schlueter

Faculty Articles

The 2016 amendments to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (“UCMJ”) amounted to a sea change in American military justice. The Military Justice Act of 2016—a major reform of the Uniform Code of Military Justice—is set out in Division E of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, and was signed into law by the President on December 23, 2016. Most of the amendments to the UCMJ addressed in this article will not become effective for some time—perhaps not until January 1, 2019 and in the interim, the current provisions of the UCMJ will continue ...


Impact Of Data On Litigation: Enhancing Cybersecurity In The Private Sector By Means Of Civil Liability Lawsuits - The Connie Francis Effect, Jeffrey F. Addicott Jan 2017

Impact Of Data On Litigation: Enhancing Cybersecurity In The Private Sector By Means Of Civil Liability Lawsuits - The Connie Francis Effect, Jeffrey F. Addicott

Faculty Articles

In order to explore the threats posed by cybersecurity breaches, first outline the steps taken by the government to address those threats in private sector economy, and then call attention to the ultimate solution, which will most certainly spur private businesses to create a more secure cyber environment for the American people - a Connie Francis-styled cyber civil action lawsuit. Technological advances opened up the unfathomable marvels of cyberspace and, by so doing, spawned a modern world that is now completely dependent on cyber, particularly in the context of sustaining and operating our critical infrastructure. Unfortunately, if supervisory control and data ...


Landowners Under Siege In The Big Bend, Amy Hardberger Jan 2016

Landowners Under Siege In The Big Bend, Amy Hardberger

Faculty Articles

It is safe to say that property rights are sacred in Texas. Nowhere is this truer than in the Big Bend region of Texas. In 2012, the Texas Attorney General’s Office issued a Landowner’s Bill of Rights specifying all the protections each of us has against government interference, including the taking of property under eminent domain. One of the requirements for land condemnation is that it be for a public use. This is to ensure that the burden placed on a few will benefit the larger community; however, the mechanisms for balancing private property rights against the public ...


The Last Hurrah: The Kutak Commission And The End Of Optimism, Michael S. Ariens Jan 2016

The Last Hurrah: The Kutak Commission And The End Of Optimism, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

No abstract provided.


Opting Out In The Name Of God: Will Lawyers Be Compelled To Handle Same-Sex Divorces?, Bill Piatt Jan 2016

Opting Out In The Name Of God: Will Lawyers Be Compelled To Handle Same-Sex Divorces?, Bill Piatt

Faculty Articles

In June of 2015, the United States Supreme Court determined by a 5–4 ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges that same-sex couples have a constitutionally guaranteed right to marry. While this represents a momentous victory for homosexuals, many people are still vehemently opposed to the idea. Homosexuality is especially frowned upon in certain religions, including some sects of Christianity. Is it possible that attorneys who decline on religious grounds to provide legal services to same-sex individuals seeking divorces will be ordered to provide that representation? Might those attorneys be sanctioned if they fail to do so? These are both novel ...


Put Your Money Where Your Water Is: Building Resilience Through Rates, Amy Hardberger Jan 2016

Put Your Money Where Your Water Is: Building Resilience Through Rates, Amy Hardberger

Faculty Articles

Utilities are challenged with the task of meeting future water demands while generating revenue through the use of the resource. Customarily, utilities base demand projections on subsequent use and calculate price on past consumption. The traditional model of extrapolating cost, based on past consumption, does not allow the utility flexibility to protect the resource in times of crisis. In recent years, water resources have been taxed by population increases and changes in weather patterns. Utilities encourage the use of water at low fees and are unable to conserve during times when the resource is available and cheap. This ineffective rate ...


Forgetting Nature: The Importance Of Including Environmental Flows In International Water Agreements, Amy Hardberger Jan 2016

Forgetting Nature: The Importance Of Including Environmental Flows In International Water Agreements, Amy Hardberger

Faculty Articles

From the moment States created political boundaries to define their territory, they have shared water. There are 263 transboundary lake and river basins worldwide and 300 known transboundary aquifer systems. Whenever sharing is present, the opportunity for conflict is too. Climate change and increasing population are only two factors that may lead to increasing conflict if attention is not given to these situations. Thankfully, sharing water also creates an opportunity for cooperation. Throughout the world, there are increasing examples of conflict and cooperation regarding shared water resources. International water agreements can promote regional peace and security and encourage economic growth ...


The Cfpb Anti-Arbitration Proposal: Let’S Just Give Arbitration A Chance, Ramona L. Lampley Jan 2016

The Cfpb Anti-Arbitration Proposal: Let’S Just Give Arbitration A Chance, Ramona L. Lampley

Faculty Articles

In October 2015, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) announced that it would propose a rule banning class action waivers in arbitration agreements for consumer financial services products. This proclamation came to fruition in May 2016 when the CFPB proposed 12 C.F.R. part 1040 and sought public comment on the proposed rule. The CFPB claims that the class-waiver, often imbedded in consumer arbitration agreements, gives companies a “free pass from being held accountable by their customers[,]” comparing it to the relief a consumer can obtain as being part of a class action. At the same time, the CFPB ...


Unconscionable Judicial Disdain For Unsophisticated Consumers And Employees' Contractual Rights? Legal And Empirical Analyses Of Courts' Mandatory Arbitration Rulings And The Systematic Erosion Of Procedural And Substantive Unconscionability Defenses Under The Federal Arbitration Act 1800-2015, Willy E. Rice Jan 2016

Unconscionable Judicial Disdain For Unsophisticated Consumers And Employees' Contractual Rights? Legal And Empirical Analyses Of Courts' Mandatory Arbitration Rulings And The Systematic Erosion Of Procedural And Substantive Unconscionability Defenses Under The Federal Arbitration Act 1800-2015, Willy E. Rice

Faculty Articles

Although the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) has taken steps to educate consumers about the perils of hidden and complicated arbitration provisions in contracts, these activities are not enough. Exceedingly large populations of unsophisticated employees need assistance because they are increasingly forced to arbitrate state and federal claims. Consequently, the Court's extremely harsh “federal policies” have gradually, systematically, and significantly eroded consumers and employees' ability to defend themselves in compulsive-arbitration trials.

While arbitration may be within the reasonable expectations of consumers, a process that builds prohibitively expensive fees into the arbitration process is not. It is substantively unconscionable to ...


Nanotechnology, Environmental Risks, And Regulatory Options, Vincent R. Johnson Jan 2016

Nanotechnology, Environmental Risks, And Regulatory Options, Vincent R. Johnson

Faculty Articles

Nanotechnology today is viewed by many as a great advance in the quest for stronger and lighter materials, more effective pharmaceuticals, and better medicine. The critical question—largely unanswered—is whether this kind of science harbors destructive powers which, if fully understood, would call for restrictions or a ban on the use of certain types of nanotechnology. Current regulations in the United States and Europe cover chemicals that may be produced in nanoform. However, those regimes are not well designed to detect the risks posed by nanotechnology because they often fail to appreciate what is unique about nanomaterials. It is ...


Sorting: Legal Specialization And The Privatization Of The American Legal Profession, Michael S. Ariens Jan 2016

Sorting: Legal Specialization And The Privatization Of The American Legal Profession, Michael S. Ariens

Faculty Articles

Beginning in the 1950s, legal specialization was promoted to the majority of the American legal profession, small firm and solo practice lawyers, by the elite of the bar as the future of legal professionalism. Legal specialization was a form of sorting lawyers, and sorting was contrary to the traditional understanding of an undivided legal profession. Over the course of the next thirty years, this effort succeeded. This new understanding of legal professionalism emphasized the idea of competence based on a deep but particularized knowledge of law. This resulted in a slipping away of the beliefs that law was a public ...


Fraud On The Court And Abusive Discovery, David R. Hague Jan 2016

Fraud On The Court And Abusive Discovery, David R. Hague

Faculty Articles

Unbeknownst to many, federal courts have the power under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure to set aside judgments entered years earlier that were obtained by “fraud on the court.” Fraud on the court, however, can take many forms and courts and commentators agree that it is a nebulous concept. The power to set aside a judgment requires courts to strike a balance between the principles of justice and finality. A majority of courts require a showing, by clear and convincing evidence, of intentional fraudulent conduct specifically directed at the court itself. This standard is flawed. And courts that have ...


Time To Repair The Chain: Void Deeds, Subsequent Purchasers, And The Texas Recording Statutes, Richard E. Flint Jan 2016

Time To Repair The Chain: Void Deeds, Subsequent Purchasers, And The Texas Recording Statutes, Richard E. Flint

Faculty Articles

Throughout the history of Texas jurisprudence, the Texas Supreme Court has often made clear and concise pronouncements that a rule of law was to apply in all cases that fell under the parameters of that rule, as well as exceptions to the application of these legal rules in situations where the application would perpetrate a fraud or would be inequitable. In several situations, Texas courts applied equitable principles to protect a subsequent purchaser in spite of the existence of a void deed in the chain of title. However, the court in Texas Department of Transportation v. A.P.I. Pipe ...


What’S Fear Got To Do With It?: The “Armed And Dangerous” Requirement Of Terry, Gerald S. Reamey Jan 2016

What’S Fear Got To Do With It?: The “Armed And Dangerous” Requirement Of Terry, Gerald S. Reamey

Faculty Articles

Reason to believe a person may be involved in criminal activity is not necessarily also reason to believe that person is armed and dangerous. "Stop and frisk," therefore, more accurately should be thought of as "stop and maybe frisk." But courts have conflated or ignored these two distinctive kinds of suspicion, inviting police officers to frisk automatically during an investigative detention, a practice that ignores the reasonableness requirement of the Fourth Amendment and subjects suspects to the indignity and intrusion of a search unsupported by any level of suspicion. This article explores some of the ways in which this undermining ...


Deadly Misunderstandings About Police Use Of Deadly Force, Gerald S. Reamey Jan 2016

Deadly Misunderstandings About Police Use Of Deadly Force, Gerald S. Reamey

Faculty Articles

This short article, written for law enforcement and criminal justice professionals in Texas, summarizes and addresses some of the most common ways in which the laws of justification in Texas are misunderstood and misapplied. The focus is on the use of deadly force by law enforcement officers and the specific provisions contained within the Texas Penal Code regulating the use of the highest level of force by police and others.


The Truth Might Set You Free: How The Michael Morton Act Could Fundamentally Change Texas Criminal Discovery, Or Not, Gerald S. Reamey Jan 2016

The Truth Might Set You Free: How The Michael Morton Act Could Fundamentally Change Texas Criminal Discovery, Or Not, Gerald S. Reamey

Faculty Articles

Michael Morton spent twenty-five years in a Texas prison for the murder of his wife, a crime he always denied committing. Following investigation aimed at proving that he was innocent, blatant prosecutorial misconduct came to light. Potentially exculpatory evidence had been hidden by the District Attorney in the case, allowing the actual killer to remain free to kill another victim before finally confessing to his crime. The attention this case attracted brought to light the stingy and discretionary discovery options available to criminal defendants in Texas, who were relegated to hoping that prosecutors would allow access to information in their ...


Case Watch: Royston, Rayzor, Vickery & Williams Llp V. Lopez, Ramona L. Lampley Dec 2015

Case Watch: Royston, Rayzor, Vickery & Williams Llp V. Lopez, Ramona L. Lampley

Faculty Articles

The Texas Supreme Court effectively gave a “thumbs-up” to attorney-client arbitration agreements in Royston, Rayzor, Vickery, & Williams, LLP v. Lopez, 467 S.W.3d 494 (Tex. 2015), reh’g denied (Sept. 11, 2015). The plaintiff, Frank Lopez, hired Royston, Rayzor to represent him in a divorce. As part of the representation agreement, Lopez agreed to arbitrate any disputes arising out of the attorney-client relationship, but the law firm excluded from the arbitration agreement any claims it might have against Lopez for expenses or fees. Lopez later sued Royston, Rayzor and the firm moved to compel arbitration.

Lopez contended that the ...


Our Court Masters, Chad J. Pomeroy Jan 2015

Our Court Masters, Chad J. Pomeroy

Faculty Articles

In 1995, Utah became the first state to pass a bill prohibiting the recognition of same-sex marriages performed in other states and nations. Thereafter, in 2004, Utah voters approved a ballot referendum on Utah Constitutional Amendment 3, which defined marriage as the legal union between a man and a woman and which restricted unmarried civil unions. This referendum was approved by 65.9% of those who voted on it. That is, 593,297 Utah citizens (of the approximately 900,000 who voted) voted to approve the amendment.

Then, in March of 2013, three couples filed suit in the United States ...


Courts Gone “Irrationally Biased” In Favor Of The Federal Arbitrations Act?—Enforcing Arbitration Provisions In Standardized Applications And Marginalizing Consumer-Protection, Antidiscrimination, And States’ Contract Laws: A 1925–2014 Legal And Empirical Analysis, Willy E. Rice Jan 2015

Courts Gone “Irrationally Biased” In Favor Of The Federal Arbitrations Act?—Enforcing Arbitration Provisions In Standardized Applications And Marginalizing Consumer-Protection, Antidiscrimination, And States’ Contract Laws: A 1925–2014 Legal And Empirical Analysis, Willy E. Rice

Faculty Articles

Spanning nearly forty years, the Supreme Court has issued multiple decisions and stated categorically that “judicial hostility to arbitration” was the sole impetus behind Congress’s decision to enact the Federal Arbitration Act of 1925. In fact, before the FAA, systemic trade-specific problems and practices generated heated disputes and widespread litigation among merchants and trade organizations. Thus, to arrest those constituents’ concerns, Congress enacted the FAA. Briefly, under the FAA section 2, arbitration is mandatory if a contractual arbitration provision is valid and a controversy “arises out of the contract.” However, common-law rules of contract formation are equally clear: Standing ...


All Your Air Right Are Belong To Us, Chad J. Pomeroy Jan 2015

All Your Air Right Are Belong To Us, Chad J. Pomeroy

Faculty Articles

Privacy and property rights are tricky subjects for a variety of reasons. One reason is that they have a unique relationship with each other, and this Article focuses on one of those areas of intersection—that of air rights and invasion of privacy. This is a timely topic due to the advent of drones, and this Article will argue that drone surveillance constitutes common law trespass and that any statute or regulation that permits such activity is in derogation of common law and so should be subject to particularly careful thought and consideration.

This is not as straightforward a thesis ...


Game Of Bombs: President Barack Obama’S Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime, Jeffrey F. Addicott Jan 2015

Game Of Bombs: President Barack Obama’S Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime, Jeffrey F. Addicott

Faculty Articles

One of President Barack Obama’s favorite solutions to reducing armed conflict in the world centers around his desire to rid the world of nuclear weapons. While this simplistic formula has certainly been voiced by other occupants of the oval office, the world is, and always has been, an extremely dangerous place, and the machinations of competing spheres of power will always exist in human history. Coupled with an aggressive Russia and China, the dangers associated with the new era of radical Islamic extremism rubricate the need to view the naiveté of President Obama’s vision of a planet without ...


Expanding The Ponzi Scheme Presumption, David R. Hague Jan 2015

Expanding The Ponzi Scheme Presumption, David R. Hague

Faculty Articles

Ponzi schemes and other investment frauds inevitably end up in bankruptcy or receivership, leaving behind numerous victims—many of whom invested their life savings in the scheme without any knowledge of its fraudulent nature. Although trustees and receivers can sometimes recover some of the fraudulently acquired funds from the assets of the perpetrators, in most cases, those assets fall woefully short of the victims’ losses. This leads to fraudulent transfer lawsuits (claw-back actions) against those who are suspected to have profited from the wrongdoing.

A transfer is fraudulent if it was made with the actual intent to defraud, but actual ...


“Underdog” Arbitration: A Plan For Transparency, Ramona L. Lampley Jan 2015

“Underdog” Arbitration: A Plan For Transparency, Ramona L. Lampley

Faculty Articles

The use of mandatory, pre-dispute arbitration clauses in consumer, employment, health-care, and even nursing home agreements is ever-increasing, even though the general public has distrust and a lack of understanding of the nature of arbitration. The Supreme Court in AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion, and then in American Express Co. v. Italian Colors Restaurant, has signaled firmly that mandatory pre-dispute arbitration is here to stay. This is true even for individual low-value claims in which one party, say the consumer or employee, has little or no bargaining power. I call these claims “underdog claims.” There have been numerous proposals to amend the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) to exclude such claims from mandatory pre-dispute arbitration agreements and numerous criticisms raised in reaction to the Court’s jurisprudence. But with the Supreme Court’s theoretical view that arbitrating underdog claims is fair, these criticisms have gone unheeded by the majority of the Court. Now the question is how should we approach this new field of dispute resolution in which so many claims will be resolved? This Article analyzes the meritorious criticisms of underdog arbitration, which include bias, the repeat-player effect, the removal of publicity, the lack of judicial oversight, and a general concern about the lack of transparency. Then I propose a three-part solution for promoting transparency to establish a system in which underdog arbitration can work. I propose that the FAA be amended to require transparency in consumer and employee claims through: (1) uniform data reporting at the arbitration service-provider level; (2) requiring a written statement of decision in such disputes; and (3) data-reporting requirements by the business entity imposing mandatory pre-dispute arbitration on the employee/consumer stake-holder


Convergence: A Meeting Responds To Cries Of Desperation, David Bristol, Lee J. Teran, Gretchen Haynes Jan 2015

Convergence: A Meeting Responds To Cries Of Desperation, David Bristol, Lee J. Teran, Gretchen Haynes

Faculty Articles

No abstract provided.


Contracting Away Your Right To Sue: What You Need To Know About Arbitration, Ramona L. Lampley Jan 2015

Contracting Away Your Right To Sue: What You Need To Know About Arbitration, Ramona L. Lampley

Faculty Articles

Arbitration agreements that typically accompany credit card agreements and other services can work well—or work disastrously. What many consumers do not realize is that in numerous everyday interactions with banks, employers and retailers, they are waiving their right to sue in court if a dispute does arise. Given the lack of consumer familiarity with arbitration, there is an inherent fear and distrust of the system often referred to either as alternative dispute resolution or private dispute resolution. Some of that public fear and distrust is well-founded. We know that private dispute resolution poses the opportunity for businesses to potentially ...


Piercing The Fiduciary Veil, Colin P. Marks Jan 2015

Piercing The Fiduciary Veil, Colin P. Marks

Faculty Articles

Limited partnerships (LPs) and limited liability companies (LLCs) permit formation with a unique management structure in that these entities may be managed by another limited liability entity, such as a corporation. Thus, the true managers are those individuals who manage the manager. It is well settled that the managing entity, such as a corporate general partner, owes default fiduciary duties, but what of these second-tier managers? Technically, it is the managing entity that owes the duties, not the managing entity’s owners, officers, and directors, yet courts have struggled with strict adherence to this separation when it would seem inequitable ...