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Articles 91 - 109 of 109

Full-Text Articles in Law

Some Recent Developments In The Department Of Law, Henry M. Bates Jan 1914

Some Recent Developments In The Department Of Law, Henry M. Bates

Articles

The present continues to be a period of rapid and interesting development in legal education. The criticisms to which the law and its administration by courts and lawyers have been subjected during the last few years very naturally and properly has led to a careful reconsideration of existing methods of legal instruction in the hope that they might perhaps be improved. The truth is that scientific legal education, comparatively speaking, is still in its infancy both in England and in the United States. Instruction in law of the dogmatic and supposedly purely practical kind has long been carried on efficiently ...


The Department Of Law And The State, Henry M. Bates Jan 1913

The Department Of Law And The State, Henry M. Bates

Articles

We are living in a period of extraordinary unrest. The spirit of criticism is prevalent, and no belief or creed, no institution is exempt from this questioning spirit of the time. Among social institutions perhaps none is being more relentlessly subjected to attack than the law as administered in our courts and practiced by our lawyers. It is true that much of the criticism leveled at legal institutions is unreasonable and is based upon ignorance or prejudice, but there remains a residuum of complaint which is well founded. In the very nature of things law and its administration always have ...


The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1912

The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

In one respect the law is the most perplexing subject with which a man can deal. It shifts and changes so rapidly that only a nimble and diligent student can keep abreast of it. One is likely to wake up any morning and find that the legislature has repealed a good part of what he knows, and he is in constant danger of having his most carefully formed opinions completely upset by a new decision of the Supreme Court. These violent changes are not due to any new discoveries, such as constantly enliven the scientific world, but merely to the ...


The Four Year Course In The Department Of Law, Henry M. Bates Jan 1912

The Four Year Course In The Department Of Law, Henry M. Bates

Articles

The present year has witnessed the final step in the establishment of the new entrance requirement to the Law Department which was undertaken by the Faculty and Regents several years ago. This, in effect, provides that every student in the Law Department from now on shall have had at least one year in the Literary Department, or its equivalent elsewhere, and places the course of the Law Department practically upon the four year basis of the other schools in the University.


President Harry Burns Hutchins, Edwin C. Goddard Jan 1910

President Harry Burns Hutchins, Edwin C. Goddard

Articles

No more striking proof of perfect confidence and high regard could be afforded than the unanimous sense of relief with which the news of the appointment of Harry Burns Hutchins as permanent President of the University was welcomed by his colleagues of all Departments, with whom he had for so many years been closely associated. Verily, he is not one without honor in his own country.


Henry Moore Bates, Joseph H. Drake Jan 1910

Henry Moore Bates, Joseph H. Drake

Articles

The important changes in the administrative force of the University this year have been of especial significance to the Law Department. It is a matter for congratulation that a r.ew Dean has been chosen from the present Faculty, thus assuring the continuation of the successful policy of the past without essential break.


The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1909

The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

In one respect the law is the most perplexing subject with which a man can deal. It shifts and changes so rapidly that only a nimble and diligent student can keep abreast of it. One is likely to wake up any morning and find that the legislature has repealed a good part of what he knows, and he is in constant danger of having his most carefully formed opinions completely upset by a new decision of the Supreme Court. These violent changes are not due to any new discoveries, such as constantly enliven the scientific world, but merely to the ...


James Valentine Campbell, Victor H. Lane Jan 1908

James Valentine Campbell, Victor H. Lane

Articles

Judge James Valentine Campbell was born in Buffalo in the State of New York on the 25th day of February, 1823, and his sixty-seventh year had just closed when he died in the City of Detroit on the 26th day of March, 1890.


Thomas Mcintyre Cooley, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1907

Thomas Mcintyre Cooley, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

In the early fifties, there were four young men practicing at the bar of the State of Michigan who became so influential during the formative period in the jurisprudence of the state that we cannot name one of them without thinking of the others. James V. Campbell, Isaac P. Christiancy, Thomas M. Cooley and Benjamin F. Graves came from New York parentage and from New England stock. The three last named received their education in the primary schools and academies of New York. As young men seeking their future they came west and settled in different parts of this state ...


Thomas Mcintyre Cooley, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1906

Thomas Mcintyre Cooley, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The Department of Law of the University was opened in the fall of 1859. The wisdom of the step was doubted by many, and it cannot be said to have had the hearty support of the profession of the State. Systematic legal education through the instrumentality of formal instruction was in its infancy. It was practically unknown in the west, for outside of New England and New York there was at the time no law school of standing and influence. The profession generally, the country over, had little sympathy with any method of training for the bar excepting the historic ...


Conveyancing In The Law Department, James H. Brewster Jan 1903

Conveyancing In The Law Department, James H. Brewster

Articles

There was a time when the young man "studied law" in the private office of some successful practicing lawyer. Much time was spent by the student in copying legal papers the real meaning of which was seldom understood and seldom explained. Fundamental legal principles were but little considered. Only under the most exceptional circumstances was this method educational. There was little, if any, systematic and orderly study of law as a science. That young men, after serving such an apprenticeship, ever became good lawyers was rather in spite of this manner of training them than because of it. As the ...


The Practice Court, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1903

The Practice Court, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

The law department of the University of Michigan has always proceeded upon the theory that the chief function of a law school is to fit men for the practice of the law. An aim to make professional instruction as thoroughly practical as possible is by no means a narrow one, nor is it out of accord with the liberalizing tendencies of university culture. The age is insisting with more and more emphasis that nothing is valuable which is not useful, a doctrine which does not put culture upon a money basis but does insist that all knowledge is but a ...


Recollection Of The Law Department, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1901

Recollection Of The Law Department, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

In 1859 the Department of Law began its work in education at the the university of Michigan, with three professors and ninety students. The faculty consisted of Thomas M. Cooley, James V. Campbell and Charles I. Walker. Judge Cooley resided in Ann Arbor and the other gentlemen lived in Detroit. At this time these men were young and inexperienced in educational work and had not achieved in any marked degree, success at the bar. Today the lives of Cooley, Campbell and Walker make up some of the best chapters in the history of the State of Michigan, and the better ...


Joseph Hardcastle Vance, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1901

Joseph Hardcastle Vance, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

On December 20, 1900, after a quarter of a century's services in the University of Michigan, Joseph H. Vance died at his rooms on Monroe street in the city of Ann Arbor. He had been confined to the house for only a few days and the announcement of his death shocked many of his friends, who had not learned of his illness. He was seventy-three years of age and to those most intimately associated with him his death was not a surprise. During the past two years marked indications of senility had appeared with painful frequency.


Elias Finley Johnson, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1901

Elias Finley Johnson, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

A biographical sketch of Elias Finley Johnson at the time of his appointment as a Supreme Judge of the Philippines. Includes a photograph.


The Professional School As A Factor In University Education, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1899

The Professional School As A Factor In University Education, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The past twenty-five years have witnessed many radical changes in professional education. Here, quite as much as in other fields of learning, the old has given place to the new. This is particularly true of legal and medical education. In these departments the changes have been chiefly in the direction of more scientific methods and greater thoroughness. In the United States, until within a comparatively recent period, professional education in law and medicine was very largely obtained through an apprenticeship in the office of the practitioner. It is true that under the old regime, the medical student, if he aspired ...


The New Law Building, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1898

The New Law Building, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

At the last meeting of the Board of Regents an important action was taken. Plans for enlarging and improving the law building were adopted, involving an expenditure of some $50,000.


The First Law Class, Bradley M. Thompson Jan 1898

The First Law Class, Bradley M. Thompson

Articles

The writer was a member of the literary class of 1858, a class great in numbers. It graduated forty-nine. It was the custom in those days for each senior to deliver an oration on commencement day. The class of '58 were limited to five minutes each, and they gave the audience a perfect fusilade of speeches for more than three hours at short range.


Law School Of The University Of Michigan, Henry W. Rogers Jan 1889

Law School Of The University Of Michigan, Henry W. Rogers

Articles

The University of Michigan is one of the two largest universities in the United States, and this position it has attained within a comparatively few years. In June, 1887, it celebrated its semi-centennial ; and the University Calendar this year issued shows a Faculty roll of one hundred and eight professors, instructors, and assistants, as well as the names of eighteen hundred and eighty-two students. Harvard University, founded in 1636, and the oldest institution of learning in the country, celebrating its two hundred and fiftieth anniversary in November, i886, leads it in numbers by only seventeen students. In 1871 the Hon ...