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Series

Articles

University of Michigan Law School

2007

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

In Memoriam: Francis A. Allen, Yale Kamisar Jan 2007

In Memoriam: Francis A. Allen, Yale Kamisar

Articles

Francis A. Allen graced the law faculties of five universities in the course of a remarkable, forty-six-year teaching career. In that time, he established himself as one of the half-dozen greatest twentieth-century American scholars of criminal law and criminal procedure.


Francis A. Allen--Architect Of Modern Criminal Procedure Scholarship, Yale Kamisar Jan 2007

Francis A. Allen--Architect Of Modern Criminal Procedure Scholarship, Yale Kamisar

Articles

Francis A. Allen, who spent the last eight years of his distinguished teaching career at the University of Florida, Fredric G. Levin College of Law, died at the age of eighty-seven. He was a leading figure in law teaching, and the legal profession generally, for more than four decades.


Branch Rickey, '11: Much More Than Pioneering Baseball Leader, Richard D. Friedman Jan 2007

Branch Rickey, '11: Much More Than Pioneering Baseball Leader, Richard D. Friedman

Articles

Branch Rickey is best known as the president and general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers who brought Jackie Robinson into big league baseball in 1947, thus integrating a major American institution seven years before Brown v. Board of Education. Even apart from this heroic step, Rickey would probably be known as the most significant baseball executive ever, primarily for his work with the Dodgers and, earlier, the St. Louis Cardinals; the modern farm system and extensive spring training facilities are chief among his many innovations. Less well known is the fact that Rickey was a 1911 graduate of the University ...


Francis A. Allen--The Gainesville Years, Jerold H. Israel Jan 2007

Francis A. Allen--The Gainesville Years, Jerold H. Israel

Articles

If the legal academy had a Hall of Fame, Frank Allen would surely be a first ballot, unanimous selection.' His nominators need only recite the bare-bones record of his career-his publications, his public service, his years of accomplished teaching, and the many honors he received. That record is neatly capsulized in an obituary, published in the Gainesville Sun, largely written by Frank and June's son, Neil (Neil was also Franks's coauthor on Frank's last publication2). In a concise, precise fashion, reminiscent of Frank's own writings, the obituary not only describes Frank's many accomplishments, but also ...