Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Series

Articles

University of Michigan Law School

2001

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

Myths And Facts About Affirmative Action, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams Jan 2001

Myths And Facts About Affirmative Action, Richard O. Lempert, David L. Chambers, Terry K. Adams

Articles

The case against affirmative action in admissions to institutions of higher education is based on the moral attractiveness of colorblind decision making and buttressed by a sense that such programs are not just unfair but pointless. Their intended beneficiaries, the argument goes, are put in situations in which they are unable to compete with whites and not only perform poorly but are destructively demoralized in the process. Common to arguments against affirmative action in admissions is a belief that minorities advantaged by it displace whites who are more deserving of admission because they have accomplished more, can better benefit from ...


The Pro Bono Priority: The University Of Michigan's Approach To Instilling Public Service, Suellyn Scarnecchia, Robert E. Precht Jan 2001

The Pro Bono Priority: The University Of Michigan's Approach To Instilling Public Service, Suellyn Scarnecchia, Robert E. Precht

Articles

The Pro Bono Priority is a two-part feature on pro bono service in Michigan law schools. in Crossing the Bar, the column of the Legal Education Committee, Dolores M. Coulter discusses how Michigan law schools measure up to the recommendations made in Learning to Serve, the report of the Commission on Pro Bono and Public Service Opportunities from the Association of American Law Schools. In the Access to Justice column, Robert E. Precht and Suellyn Scarnecchia focus specifically on the University of MichiHgan's unique approach to pro bono service.


Essay: Recent Trends In American Legal Education, Paul D. Reingold Jan 2001

Essay: Recent Trends In American Legal Education, Paul D. Reingold

Articles

An American law professor in Japan has much more to learn than to teach. A foreigner like me - who comes to Japan on short notice, with no knowledge of Japanese culture and institutions, and with no Japanese language skills - sets himself a formidable task. Happily, the courtesy of my hosts, the patience of my colleagues, and the devotion of my students, have made for a delightful visit. I thank all of you. You asked me to talk about American legal education. As you surely know, the system of legal education in the U.S. is very different from the system ...


For Terry Sandalow - Challenger And Creator, Christina B. Whitman Jan 2001

For Terry Sandalow - Challenger And Creator, Christina B. Whitman

Articles

In the popular imagination, legal education is the experience of sitting in a classroom and being pushed to think deeply by a brilliant and demanding teacher. Some law schools are lucky enough to have a faculty member who actually fulfills this expectation - one professor in particular whose courses are the testing ground for the very best and most engaged students. When I was a student at Michigan in the 1970s, and until his retirement last year at the end of the century, that teacher was Terry Sandalow. For many Michigan graduates, taking Federal Courts or Fourteenth Amendment from Professor Sandalow ...