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Articles 91 - 104 of 104

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1912

The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

In one respect the law is the most perplexing subject with which a man can deal. It shifts and changes so rapidly that only a nimble and diligent student can keep abreast of it. One is likely to wake up any morning and find that the legislature has repealed a good part of what he knows, and he is in constant danger of having his most carefully formed opinions completely upset by a new decision of the Supreme Court. These violent changes are not due to any new discoveries, such as constantly enliven the scientific world, but merely to the ...


The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1909

The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

In one respect the law is the most perplexing subject with which a man can deal. It shifts and changes so rapidly that only a nimble and diligent student can keep abreast of it. One is likely to wake up any morning and find that the legislature has repealed a good part of what he knows, and he is in constant danger of having his most carefully formed opinions completely upset by a new decision of the Supreme Court. These violent changes are not due to any new discoveries, such as constantly enliven the scientific world, but merely to the ...


Legal Education In The United States, Horace Lafayette Wilgus Jan 1908

Legal Education In The United States, Horace Lafayette Wilgus

Articles

The origin of law schools is lost in antiquity. It is probable there were advocates in Babylonia,1 and schools for the education of judges and scribes (perhaps the ancestral lawyers) in Egypt,2 more than 2000 years B.C. The Civil Code of Deuteronomy was published 621 B.C.,3 and soon afterward schools of the prophets were formed for its study.4 When Ezra left Babylon for Jerusalem (485 B.C.) he "set his heart * * * to teach in Jerusalem statutes and judgments,"5 and the ruins of his school could be seen by the law students at Husal ...


The Law Teacher--His Functions And Responsibilities, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1908

The Law Teacher--His Functions And Responsibilities, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The notion that the teaching of the law is quite as much a profession as is the practice of it, and that it demands an intellectual equipment of a high order, is probably gaining ground. It is fully recognized by those who understand what systematic legal education, as carried on to-day in our leading law schools, really is. But as yet the majority of laymen, and very many lawyers, probably most lawyers who were educated under the old regime as well as most of those who have come to the bar through the law office, fail to appreciate the full ...


Humanistic, And Particularly Classical, Studies As A Preparation For The Law, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1907

Humanistic, And Particularly Classical, Studies As A Preparation For The Law, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

Aside from the elementary branches, no particular subject is absolutely essential as a basis for the study and practice of the law. In this respect the law occupies a place somewhat different from that of the other learned professions. The student and practitioner of medicine must of necessity get a substantial scientific foundation for his professional work. This for him is an absolutely essential prerequisite. For the professional courses in engineering a special and definite scientific preparation must be made; without it nothing but the most ordinary work in engineering can be accomplished. And it is probable that for theology ...


Law As A Culture Study, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1906

Law As A Culture Study, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

That acute observer and commentator on American institutions, James Bryce, in an oft-quoted statement in his American Commonwealth, pays a high tribute to the efficiency of American law schools. "I do not know if there is anything," he writes, "in which America has advanced more beyond the mother country than in the provision she makes for legal education." In passing this generous judgment, in which many other eminent Englishmen have concurred, he views our law schools simply as institutions for developing technical proficiency among students destined to fill the ranks of the legal profession. And this is, indeed, the principal ...


Conveyancing In The Law Department, James H. Brewster Jan 1903

Conveyancing In The Law Department, James H. Brewster

Articles

There was a time when the young man "studied law" in the private office of some successful practicing lawyer. Much time was spent by the student in copying legal papers the real meaning of which was seldom understood and seldom explained. Fundamental legal principles were but little considered. Only under the most exceptional circumstances was this method educational. There was little, if any, systematic and orderly study of law as a science. That young men, after serving such an apprenticeship, ever became good lawyers was rather in spite of this manner of training them than because of it. As the ...


The Practice Court, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1903

The Practice Court, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

The law department of the University of Michigan has always proceeded upon the theory that the chief function of a law school is to fit men for the practice of the law. An aim to make professional instruction as thoroughly practical as possible is by no means a narrow one, nor is it out of accord with the liberalizing tendencies of university culture. The age is insisting with more and more emphasis that nothing is valuable which is not useful, a doctrine which does not put culture upon a money basis but does insist that all knowledge is but a ...


Joseph Hardcastle Vance, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1901

Joseph Hardcastle Vance, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

On December 20, 1900, after a quarter of a century's services in the University of Michigan, Joseph H. Vance died at his rooms on Monroe street in the city of Ann Arbor. He had been confined to the house for only a few days and the announcement of his death shocked many of his friends, who had not learned of his illness. He was seventy-three years of age and to those most intimately associated with him his death was not a surprise. During the past two years marked indications of senility had appeared with painful frequency.


Suggestions As To The Study Of Law, Floyd R. Mechem Jan 1901

Suggestions As To The Study Of Law, Floyd R. Mechem

Articles

I have been asked to make a few suggestions respecting the study of law. I realize, of course, that I am in no position to speak with authority upon the subject. I realize also that it is a subject upon which competent judges might give different opinions. It seems to me, however, that two or three points may be suggested with reference to which all might agree.


The Professional School As A Factor In University Education, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1899

The Professional School As A Factor In University Education, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The past twenty-five years have witnessed many radical changes in professional education. Here, quite as much as in other fields of learning, the old has given place to the new. This is particularly true of legal and medical education. In these departments the changes have been chiefly in the direction of more scientific methods and greater thoroughness. In the United States, until within a comparatively recent period, professional education in law and medicine was very largely obtained through an apprenticeship in the office of the practitioner. It is true that under the old regime, the medical student, if he aspired ...


The First Law Class, Bradley M. Thompson Jan 1898

The First Law Class, Bradley M. Thompson

Articles

The writer was a member of the literary class of 1858, a class great in numbers. It graduated forty-nine. It was the custom in those days for each senior to deliver an oration on commencement day. The class of '58 were limited to five minutes each, and they gave the audience a perfect fusilade of speeches for more than three hours at short range.


Embarrassments To Legal Education, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1892

Embarrassments To Legal Education, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

In European countries a student is not allowed to undertake the study of law until he has received a degree equivalent to the A. B. degree in American colleges, and the minimum term of study is three years, and in some cases four or even five years are required. With some mortification, we recognize that the profession of law in this country has not approximated this high standard.


Law Schools And Legal Education, Henry W. Rogers Jan 1888

Law Schools And Legal Education, Henry W. Rogers

Articles

In the February number of the AMERICAN LAW REGISTER, there appeared an interesting article from the pen of Mr. Henry Budd, discussing the relation of law schools to legal education. The motive which inspired the writing of the article, was a commendable one, and the desire of the writer to have a higher standard established, governing admissions to the bar, will be quite generally concurred in. No one could read the article in question, however, without readily perceiving that the law schools of the United States were considered to be, in large measure, responsible for the admission to the bar ...