Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 61 - 90 of 104

Full-Text Articles in Law

Book Review, Marianne Wesson Jan 1996

Book Review, Marianne Wesson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Why Hard Cases Make Good (Clinical) Law, Paul D. Reingold Jan 1996

Why Hard Cases Make Good (Clinical) Law, Paul D. Reingold

Articles

In 1992, when the University of California's Hastings College of Law decided to offer a live-client clinic for the first time, its newly hired director had to make several decisions about what form the program should take.1 The first question for the director was whether the clinic should be a single-issue specialty clinic or a general clinic that would represent clients across several areas of the law. The second question, and the one that will be the focus of this essay, was whether the program should restrict its caseload to "easy" routine cases or also accept non-routine, less ...


The Rhythms Of Hope And Disappointment In The Language Of Judging (St. John's University School Of Law: Rededication Symposia), James Boyd White Jan 1996

The Rhythms Of Hope And Disappointment In The Language Of Judging (St. John's University School Of Law: Rededication Symposia), James Boyd White

Articles

I want to talk today about a certain aspect or dimension of the language of judging. From one point of view the quality I mean can be seen as a kind of idealism inherent in legal lan­guage; from another, as a kind of fundamental hypocrisy; from still another, as a simultaneously tragic and comic element in le­gal life.


On Becoming A Law Professor, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1996

On Becoming A Law Professor, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

Thirty-five years ago, when I first joined a law faculty, only one job description existed for law professors, that for the conventional classroom teacher. In the years since, the opportunities available to lawyers interested in teaching have become a bit more varied. In addition to conventional classroom teachers, a growing number of law teachers are employed by law schools to provide what I shall somewhat misleadingly call clinical instruction.1 Although these comments are addressed mainly to men and women interested in classroom teaching, a few lines about clinical teaching may be in order because the initial question for anyone ...


Stress And Health In 1st-Year Law Students: Women Fare Worse, Daniel N. Mcintosh, Julie Keywell, Alan Reifman, Phoebe C. Ellsworth Jan 1994

Stress And Health In 1st-Year Law Students: Women Fare Worse, Daniel N. Mcintosh, Julie Keywell, Alan Reifman, Phoebe C. Ellsworth

Articles

The social and psychological consequences of being a female law student may include greater stress and worse health than that experienced by male students. First-year law students at a major state university were surveyed about their physical and psychological health prior to, in the middle of, and at the end of the school year. They were also asked about specific sources of strain (e.g., grades, time pressure) at mid-year. Relative to men, women reported greater strain due to sexism, lack of free time, and lack of time to spend with one’s spouse/partner. Women also displayed more depression ...


Thoughts Evoked By "Accounting And The New Corporate Law", Ted J. Fiflis Jan 1993

Thoughts Evoked By "Accounting And The New Corporate Law", Ted J. Fiflis

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Burdens Of Educational Loans: The Impacts Of Debt On Job Choice And Standards Of Living For Students At Nine American Law Schools, David L. Chambers Jan 1992

The Burdens Of Educational Loans: The Impacts Of Debt On Job Choice And Standards Of Living For Students At Nine American Law Schools, David L. Chambers

Articles

American law students are borrowing large sums of money. For graduates at many schools, cumulative debts of $40,000 from college and law school have become the norm, and debts of $50,000, $60,000, and even more are common. The sums students are borrowing are much larger today than they were ten years ago, even after adjusting for increases in the cost of living. They have risen at a considerably faster pace than the starting salaries at small law firms and government agencies. They have even risen at a faster pace than the starting salaries in many large firms ...


Clinical Realism: Simulated Hearings Based On Actual Events In Students' Lives, Samuel R. Gross Jan 1990

Clinical Realism: Simulated Hearings Based On Actual Events In Students' Lives, Samuel R. Gross

Articles

This essay describes a novel clinical format, a simulation course that is based on students' testimony about actual events in their own lives. The two main purposes of the course, however, are not novel. First, I aim to teach the students to be effective trial lawyers by instructing them in the techniques of direct examination and cross-examination and by making them sensitive to the roles of the other courtroom players: the witness, the judge, and the jury. Second, I hope to encourage the students to think about the social and ethical consequences of our method of trying lawsuits.


Kevin E. Kennedy, Joseph Vining Jan 1990

Kevin E. Kennedy, Joseph Vining

Articles

Our first encounter was on one of Kevin's many triumphant days during law school. Kevin, then a second year student, had advanced to the final round of the Campbell Competition, the moot court competition in which students brief and argue a case as if before the United States Supreme Court. I was one of the five "justices" who heard the case. The others were the dean and three distinguished appellate judges. Four students presented oral arguments and all were fine, but, Kevin's, the "Justices" agreed, was simply of a different order. Archibald Cox, when Solicitor General of the ...


Accommodation And Satisfaction: Women And Men Lawyers And The Balance Of Work And Family, David L. Chambers Jan 1989

Accommodation And Satisfaction: Women And Men Lawyers And The Balance Of Work And Family, David L. Chambers

Articles

This study of graduates of the University of Michigan Law School from the late 1970s reports on the differing ways that women and men have responded to the conflicting claims of work and family. It finds that women with children who have entered the profession have indeed continued to bear the principalr esponsibilitiesf or the care of children, but it alsof inds that these women, with all their burdens, are more satisfied with their careers and with the balance of their family and professional lives than other women and than men.


Educational Debts And The Worsening Position Of Small-Firm, Government, And Legal-Services Lawyers, David L. Chambers Jan 1989

Educational Debts And The Worsening Position Of Small-Firm, Government, And Legal-Services Lawyers, David L. Chambers

Articles

Law school operating costs are up. Tuitions are up. The debts of law students are up. What is happening to the students who have borrowed large sums? Are their debts affecting their decisions about the jobs to seek? Once in practice, are they significantly affecting the standard of living they can afford to maintain? What, in particular, is the effect of debts on those who enter-or contemplate entering-small firms, government, legal services, and "public interest" work where salaries are lower than in most other settings in which lawyers work? In the preceding essay, Jack Kramer has performed another extremely valuable ...


Andrew M. Walkover: 1949-1988, Thomas A. Green Jan 1988

Andrew M. Walkover: 1949-1988, Thomas A. Green

Articles

I knew Andy Walkover best as a student. I met him first in my evidence class at the University of Michigan. He was the "sixties type" in the left rear corner who, especially at first, was too often absent but had the most interesting things to say when he came to class. I did not realize it at the time, but Andy was just beginning to discover his vocation. Andy was a rare law student. He was interested in many things, but he would not let others set the agenda for his interests; in particular, he would not let an ...


Andrew Walkover, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1988

Andrew Walkover, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

One of the pleasures of teaching, less frequently experienced than most of us care to admit, is the sense that one has made a contribution to a student's intellectual development. Another, even rarer, is the experience of encountering a student who contributes to one's own intellectual development. Andy was, for me, a source of both kinds of pleasure, though I am more confident that I am justified in the latter than in the former.


Francis A. Allen, Terrance Sandalow Dec 1986

Francis A. Allen, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

Writing a brief tribute to Frank Allen, a man I admire as much as any I have known, should have been easy and pleasurable. It has proved to be very difficult. The initial difficulty is the occasion for the tribute. Frank's decision to take early retirement from the University and to resettle in a warmer climate deprives the Sandalows of frequent contact with two of our favorite people. The act of writing requires an acceptance of that loss that I have not yet achieved. A second difficulty is that Frank has been an important influence in my life for ...


Thoughts On Teaching, Christina B. Whitman Jan 1985

Thoughts On Teaching, Christina B. Whitman

Articles

I teach in classrooms where, ten years ago, I sat as a student. People who were my teachers are now my colleagues. People who were my students are still my friends. The difference between teacher and student, it seems to me, is more appropriately described as progression through a life than as distinct positions in a hierarchy.


Invisible Teachers: A Comment On Perceptions In The Classroom, Robert F. Nagel Jan 1984

Invisible Teachers: A Comment On Perceptions In The Classroom, Robert F. Nagel

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Moral Responsibility Of Law Schools, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1984

The Moral Responsibility Of Law Schools, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

The subject I have been asked to address, the moral responsibility of-law schools, is perplexing, less because answers to the implicit question are uncertain than because the meaning of the question is unclear. Our ideas about moral responsibility have been formed in reference to individuals. They presuppose the existence of distinctively human characteristics such as understanding and will. What, then, can be meant by the moral responsibility of "law schools," institutions that, just because they are not human, necessarily lack these capacities?


Invisible Teachers: A Comment On Perceptions In The Classroom, Robert F. Nagel Jan 1982

Invisible Teachers: A Comment On Perceptions In The Classroom, Robert F. Nagel

Articles

No abstract provided.


Administrators And Teachers—An Uneasy But Vital Relationship, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1979

Administrators And Teachers—An Uneasy But Vital Relationship, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

If William Faulkner could people a whole universe with the denizens of one atypical county in deepest Mississippi, I should be able to draw some general observations about the administration of teaching in American universities from my seven years' experience as dean of the Michigan Law School. But I lay no claim to Mr. Faulkner's powers of universalization, and so I shall begin with a few caveats about the peculiarities of legal education, about the ways we differ from undergraduate and graduate schools and even from other professional schools. My opinions can then be discounted accordingly.


George Palmer, Terrance Sandalow Nov 1978

George Palmer, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

I first met George Palmer, nearly fifteen years ago, when I came to Ann Arbor to discuss the possibility of joining the faculty. The chairman of the Personnel Committee had scheduled the customary round of informal meetings with small groups of faculty members. As I recall, the first two of these meetings were marked by a certain awkwardness that I have since learned is common when faculties are interviewing someone already in teaching. The participants all understand that the object of such meetings is to permit judgments to be made about one another's intellectual qualities; yet, a certain delicacy ...


Bad News And Good News, John W. Reed Jan 1976

Bad News And Good News, John W. Reed

Articles

I have been asked to visit with you about some of my current interests in the evidence field, in which I teach. When you invite an academic lawyer to speak at your meeting, you obviously expect of him something other than the latest hot tips on trial strategy and tactics, something other than a speech entitled "Reflections on My Last Eleven Victories in Court." Others can do that for you, probably at lunch - or, even better, at cocktails with the successes more impressive and the defeats more forgivable under the influence of an ounce or two of alcohol.


Legal Education In The Soviet Union And Eastern Europe, Whitmore Gray Jan 1971

Legal Education In The Soviet Union And Eastern Europe, Whitmore Gray

Articles

The following notes are based on interviews with law professors, law students and lawyers during a brief trip in 1970 to Moscow, Budapest and Prague. On previous visits in 1959 and 1965 the writer had visited law schools in Kiev, Baku, Tbilisi, Alma Ata, Leningrad, Prague and Warsaw, and had sat in on lectures, recitation sections, and examinations.1 In looking this time for changes, the writer was particularly interested in whether there was some reflection there of the general student malaise which the United States has been experiencing, manifested in American law schools in student pressure for "relevant" courses ...


The Basic Course—A Mild Dissent, Whitmore Gray Jan 1971

The Basic Course—A Mild Dissent, Whitmore Gray

Articles

Perhaps it is unusual to start a discussion of a topic with a dissent from the assumption underlying its choice, but I think that in the present case this may be justified. The present topic was no doubt selected because for many years teachers have viewed the course in "comparative law" as a basic course, leading subsequently to specialized courses or research in various subject matters or geographical areas. In fact, the other two speakers on this afternoon's program, Professors Rudolf Schlesinger of Cornell and Arthur von Mehren of Harvard, are both on record in the form of their ...


The Lawyer As A Negotiator: An Adventure In Understanding And Teaching The Art Of Negotiation, James J. White Jan 1967

The Lawyer As A Negotiator: An Adventure In Understanding And Teaching The Art Of Negotiation, James J. White

Articles

In the fall of 1965 we enlisted experience as a teacher in an experimental seminar called "The Lawyer as a Negotiator." We gave the students experience not by simulation but by making them negotiate with one another for their grades in the course. In this as in many other "experience" courses the teaching supplement consisted of readings and of classroom participation by the students and teachers. However the supplement differed from the standard trials and appeals or legal writing course in that a psychiatrist was a full partner in the teaching and in the discussion and analysis of the student ...


Ann Arbor And Legal Aid, James J. White Jan 1967

Ann Arbor And Legal Aid, James J. White

Articles

Since the leasing of its office in August 1965, the Washtenaw County Legal Aid Society has been open nearly 50 hours per week and has been staffed exclusively by second and third-year law students from the University of Michigan Law School. The bulk of the practice has been in family law--divorce, support, custody--but there have been a substantial number of creditor-debtor cases, a handful of misdemeanor defense cases, and a large batch of miscellaneous cases.


The Michigan Law Review: A Survey, John B. Waite Mar 1924

The Michigan Law Review: A Survey, John B. Waite

Articles

"The Michigan Law Review was instituted as a means of special education for those seniors in the Law Department who proved themselves particularly capable of profitting[sic] therefrom. It stands also as an extremely valuable service of the Law School to its alumni and to practicing lawyers in general."


The Future Of Michigan's Law School, Henry M. Bates Mar 1924

The Future Of Michigan's Law School, Henry M. Bates

Articles

An article penned by Dean Bates in anticipation of the opening of the Law School's Lawyers' Club buildings in the following year. Bates does not mention by name the "distinguished alumnus of the University" whose "vision has developed the best-conceived and most effective plan in the history of the legal profession and the interests which it serves." A general narrative "travelogue" of the Law School in 1924.


Teaching Of International Law To Law Students, Edwin D. Dickinson Jan 1923

Teaching Of International Law To Law Students, Edwin D. Dickinson

Articles

A point to be noted at the outset, in any discussion of the teaching of international law to law students, is the relatively unimportant place which the subject occupies in the law student's program of study. The students in our law schools are tolerant of the interest which others manifest in international law. Indeed they are themselves greatly interested. They concede freely that it occupies an important place in the general scheme of things. But most of them feel that professional students cannot afford the time for even an introductory course. It results that courses in international law included ...


The Department Of Law And The State, Henry M. Bates Jan 1913

The Department Of Law And The State, Henry M. Bates

Articles

We are living in a period of extraordinary unrest. The spirit of criticism is prevalent, and no belief or creed, no institution is exempt from this questioning spirit of the time. Among social institutions perhaps none is being more relentlessly subjected to attack than the law as administered in our courts and practiced by our lawyers. It is true that much of the criticism leveled at legal institutions is unreasonable and is based upon ignorance or prejudice, but there remains a residuum of complaint which is well founded. In the very nature of things law and its administration always have ...


The Four Year Course In The Department Of Law, Henry M. Bates Jan 1912

The Four Year Course In The Department Of Law, Henry M. Bates

Articles

The present year has witnessed the final step in the establishment of the new entrance requirement to the Law Department which was undertaken by the Faculty and Regents several years ago. This, in effect, provides that every student in the Law Department from now on shall have had at least one year in the Literary Department, or its equivalent elsewhere, and places the course of the Law Department practically upon the four year basis of the other schools in the University.