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Linking Progressive Corporate Law With Progressive Social Movements, Kellye Y. Testy Jan 2002

Linking Progressive Corporate Law With Progressive Social Movements, Kellye Y. Testy

Articles

Professor Testy critically assesses what has been termed a "new" corporate social responsibility project After noting the hegemony of shareholder primacy in corporate law, she critiques four major counter-hegemonic discourses: team production theory, corporate social accountabiity, stakeholder theory, and corporate social responsibility (or progressive corporate law). Finding the first three ineffective foils for the problems of corporate power that have spurred calls for reform, she turns to an examination of the progressive corporate law project. That project, presently poised at a defining juncture as it attempts to use the "master's tools" to "dismantle the master's house," nonetheless holds ...


Community Prosecutors, Anthony V. Alfieri Jan 2002

Community Prosecutors, Anthony V. Alfieri

Articles

No abstract provided.


Banking For The Unbanked, Michael S. Barr Jan 2002

Banking For The Unbanked, Michael S. Barr

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The consequences of not having access to mainstream financial services can be severe. Fim, the "unbanked" face high costs for basic financial servies. For example, a 2000 Treasury [U.S. Treasury Department] study found that a worker eaming $12,000 a year would pay approximately $250 annually just to cash payroll checks at a check cashing outlet, in addition to fees for money orders, wire transfers, bill payments, and other common transactions. Regular payments with low credit risk that could be directly deposited into bank accounts, with significantly lower payment systems costs, form the bulk of checks cashed at these ...


Justice For Interests Of The Poor: The Problem Of Navigating The System Without Counsel, Deborah J. Cantrell Jan 2002

Justice For Interests Of The Poor: The Problem Of Navigating The System Without Counsel, Deborah J. Cantrell

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Discretionary Power Of "Public" Prosecutors In Historical Perspective, Carolyn B. Ramsey Jan 2002

The Discretionary Power Of "Public" Prosecutors In Historical Perspective, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Articles

Norms urging prosecutors to seek justice by playing a quasi-judicial role and striving for fairness to defendants are often assumed to have deep historical roots. Yet, in fact, such a conception of the prosecutor's role is relatively new. Based on archival research on the papers of the New York County District Attorney's Office, "The Discretionary Power of 'Public' Prosecutors in Historical Perspective" explores the meaning of the word "public" as it applied to prosecutors in the nineteenth century. This article shows that, in the early days of public prosecution, district attorneys were expected to maximize convictions and leave ...


Ethics, Race, And Reform, Anthony V. Alfieri Jan 2002

Ethics, Race, And Reform, Anthony V. Alfieri

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No abstract provided.


Access To Financial Services In The 21st Century: Five Opportunities For The Bush Administration And The 107th Congress (Symposium On Poverty And The Law)., Michael S. Barr Jan 2002

Access To Financial Services In The 21st Century: Five Opportunities For The Bush Administration And The 107th Congress (Symposium On Poverty And The Law)., Michael S. Barr

Articles

Noticeably absent from debate over President Bush's agenda is any discussion of a central question for equality of opportunity in the 21st century. Access to financial services is the "passport" to our modem economy, as former Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers oft said, but despite the enormous progress that has been made over the last decade, too many families in the United States still are left out of the financial services mainstream. There are five key opportunities that the Bush Administration, working with Congress and the private sector, can seize in order to continue to democratize access to financial ...


Hate Crimes And Everyday Discrimination: Influences Of And On The Social Context, Lu-In Wang Jan 2002

Hate Crimes And Everyday Discrimination: Influences Of And On The Social Context, Lu-In Wang

Articles

This article discusses aspects of hate crime that make it somewhat unexceptional. By making these points, I do not in any way mean to imply that hate crime is not a problem worthy of attention in the law. To the contrary, I believe that to point out the unexceptional aspects of hate crimes is to highlight just how important a problem hate crime is, and may help us to develop more effective ways of addressing it. My points are based largely on lessons drawn from social science and historical research on the effects of and motivations behind bias-related violence. Specifically ...


Unwarranted Assumptions In The Prosecution And Defense Of Hate Crimes, Lu-In Wang Jan 2002

Unwarranted Assumptions In The Prosecution And Defense Of Hate Crimes, Lu-In Wang

Articles

Although at far from the level of intensity and prominence that it reached 10 years ago, the controversy over hate crimes legislation continues. In the early 1990s, debate centered on two main points of contention: whether such laws, which either criminalized traditionally racist acts or increased the punishment for other crimes when they were motivated by racial or ethnic bias, violated the First Amendment right to freedom of expression, and whether the laws were unwise and illegitimate because they seemed to provide greater protection against crime to minority groups and to emphasize, rather than obscure or obliterate, the racial divisions ...


The Social Responsibility Of Large Multinational Corporations, Douglas M. Branson Jan 2002

The Social Responsibility Of Large Multinational Corporations, Douglas M. Branson

Articles

In the 1970s, legal scholars wrote extensively on the subject, as it was then known, "corporate social responsibility." Proposals surfaced for pubic interest directors, mandatory social accounting and disclosure, increased use of Security Exchange Commission (SEC) shareholder proxy proposals, federal minimum debate was eclipsed completely by the law and economics movement of the 1980s. Now, in the new century, the inquiry into social responsibility of large corporations has begun anew. This article is an attempt to take that inquiry, or debate, and place it in the international context.

I have four stories to tell. First is that much of the ...


Judicial Activism: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly, Arthur D. Hellman Jan 2002

Judicial Activism: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly, Arthur D. Hellman

Articles

No matter how judges are selected, sooner or later some unfortunate candidate will be labeled a "judicial activist." One has to wonder: Does the term have any identifiable core meaning? Or is it just an all-purpose term of opprobrium, reflecting whatever brand of judicial behavior the speaker regards as particularly pernicious? Implicit in this question are several important issues about the role of courts in our democratic society.

I take my definition from Judge Richard Posner, who describes activist decisions as those that expand judicial power over other branches of the national government or over state governments. Unlike other uses ...


Chief Judge Proctor Hug, Jr. And The Split That Didn't Happen, Arthur D. Hellman Jan 2002

Chief Judge Proctor Hug, Jr. And The Split That Didn't Happen, Arthur D. Hellman

Articles

Judge Procter Hug, Jr. became Chief Judge of the Ninth Circuit on March 1, 1996. Nine months earlier, eight Senators from five western states had introduced Senate Bill 956. The purpose of the bill, as stated in its title, was "to divide the ninth judicial circuit of the United States into two circuits." If the bill had been enacted, it would have been only the third time in the 104-year history of the federal courts of appeals that a circuit was split. And it would have been the first time that Congress had divided a circuit without waiting for a ...


Behavioral Genetics And The Best Interests Of The Child Decision Rule, David J. Herring Jan 2002

Behavioral Genetics And The Best Interests Of The Child Decision Rule, David J. Herring

Articles

This article proposes that modern child custody law should be reassessed in light of recent scientific findings. Judicial determinations of custody use the "best interests of the child" rule. The rule is justified to a large extent by the goal of maximizing child developmental outcomes. The assumption is that a child whose "best interests" are protected stands a better chance of becoming a socially well-adjusted, productive and prosperous citizen.

Recent child development studies have shown that so-called "shared environment," or home environment factors have little effect on child development so long as the shared environment is minimally adequate. Genetics and ...


The Mote In Thy Brother’S Eye: A Review Of Human Rights As Politics And Idolatry, William M. Carter Jr. Jan 2002

The Mote In Thy Brother’S Eye: A Review Of Human Rights As Politics And Idolatry, William M. Carter Jr.

Articles

Michael Ignatieffs provocatively titled collection of essays, Human Rights As Politics and Idolatry [hereinafter Human Rights], is a careful examination of the theoretical underpinnings and contradictions in the area of human rights. At bottom, both of his primary essays, Human Rights As Politics and Human Rights As Idolatry, make a claim that is perhaps contrary to the instincts of human rights thinkers and activists: namely, that international human rights can best be philosophically justified and effectively applied to the extent that they strive for minimal ism. Human rights activists generally argue for the opposite conclusion: that international human rights be ...


Sovereignty: The State, The Individual, And The International Legal System In The Twenty First Century, Ronald A. Brand Jan 2002

Sovereignty: The State, The Individual, And The International Legal System In The Twenty First Century, Ronald A. Brand

Articles

This essay proposes that an understanding of original concepts of sovereignty both helps explain twentieth century developments in international law and provides a proper context for coming changes in the ways in which persons relate to states, states relate to states within the international legal system, and ultimately and most importantly-the way international law affects and applies to persons. The most important developments in international law in the new century are likely not to be in state-state relationships but rather in the status and rights of the person in international law. The twentieth century process of globalization brought us back ...


Comparative Forum Non Conveniens And The Hague Judgments Convention, Ronald A. Brand Jan 2002

Comparative Forum Non Conveniens And The Hague Judgments Convention, Ronald A. Brand

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This article begins with a discussion of the application of the forum non conveniens doctrine in four common law legal systems. It then briefly notes related concepts applied in the courts of two civil law systems. This discussion is followed in Part IV by a brief history of the negotiations at the Hague Conference on Private International Law for a Convention on Jurisdiction and Foreign Judgments in Civil and Commercial Matters and a review of Articles 21 and 22 of the Interim Text of that Convention created at the June 2001 portion of the Diplomatic Conference. This review allows conclusions ...


The Rule That Isn't A Rule - The Business Judgment Rule, Douglas M. Branson Jan 2002

The Rule That Isn't A Rule - The Business Judgment Rule, Douglas M. Branson

Articles

On a doctrinal basis, few areas of corporate law are more confused then the duty of care applicable to corporate officials and its handmaiden, the business judgment rule. The tendency of many scholars and practitioners has been to collapse the duty of care into the business judgment rule, as Professor Stuart Cohn pointed out more than a decade ago. The business judgment rule is a separate legal construct that is related to, but separate from, the duty of care and one which protects only proactive and not somnambulant directors and officers. The business judgment rule stays at center stage for ...


Promoting Judicial Acceptance And Use Of Limited Guardianship, Lawrence A. Frolik Jan 2002

Promoting Judicial Acceptance And Use Of Limited Guardianship, Lawrence A. Frolik

Articles

Guardianship comes within the special province of judges. In the great majority of guardianship hearings, there is no jury. The presiding judge is the sole arbiter of whether the alleged incapacitated person meets the legal standard of mental incapacity and whether that person would benefit from the appointment of a guardian. If a guardian is appointed, the judge determines the type and extent of the powers granted to the guardian. Of course, the judge is not simply free to follow his or her own instincts or desires, for the judge is bound to determine the facts carefully and apply the ...


Can A Theory Of Interpretation Make A Difference?, George H. Taylor Jan 2002

Can A Theory Of Interpretation Make A Difference?, George H. Taylor

Articles

Can a theory of interpretation make a difference? The question has been posed most prominently by Judge Richard Posner, who, in recent work, has criticized the ability to make a difference of both theory writ large and of a theory of interpretation in particular. In other work I contend, contrary to Posner, that a theory of interpretation can make a difference at the level of methodology. Using the example of constitutional and statutory interpretation in law, I develop a theory that argues for the propriety and value of certain methods of interpretation over others. In the present essay, my concern ...


Community Competence For Matters Of Judicial Cooperation At The Hague Conference On Private International Law: A View From The United States, Ronald A. Brand Jan 2002

Community Competence For Matters Of Judicial Cooperation At The Hague Conference On Private International Law: A View From The United States, Ronald A. Brand

Articles

The Amsterdam Treaty's introduction of Article 65 into the European Community Treaty took little time to achieve practical importance. In fact, the questions were practical as early as they were theoretical. A 1992 request by the United States that the Hague Conference on Private International Law negotiate a global convention on jurisdiction and the recognition of civil judgments resulted in a laboratory for the new-found competence of the Community. Thus, negotiations already underway--which included delegations from all 15 EU Member States--were affected significantly by the transfer of competence from those states to the Community institutions for matters under consideration ...


The Developing Field Of Elder Law Redux: Ten Years After, Lawrence A. Frolik Jan 2002

The Developing Field Of Elder Law Redux: Ten Years After, Lawrence A. Frolik

Articles

In 1993, Professor Frolik helped initiate The Elder Law Journal's first issue with his essay, The Developing Field of Elder Law: A Historical Perspective. Today, with the publication of the tenth volume of the Journal, Professor Frolik looks back over the past decade to reflect on the changes that have occurred within the field. In the past, he writes, Medicaid planning was thought by many to be the core of an elder law practice. This was not the case ten years ago, however, and it is certainly not true in the twenty-first century; elder law attorneys must practice in ...