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Articles 1 - 20 of 20

Full-Text Articles in Law

Land Use, Science, And Spirituality: The Search For A True And Lasting Relationship With The Land, Charles Wilkinson Jan 2000

Land Use, Science, And Spirituality: The Search For A True And Lasting Relationship With The Land, Charles Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Indirect Constitutional Discourse: A Comment On Meese, Robert F. Nagel Jan 2000

Indirect Constitutional Discourse: A Comment On Meese, Robert F. Nagel

Articles

No abstract provided.


Colorado Association Of Law Libraries, Georgia Briscoe Jan 2000

Colorado Association Of Law Libraries, Georgia Briscoe

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Conundrum Of Executive Compensation, Mark J. Loewenstein Jan 2000

The Conundrum Of Executive Compensation, Mark J. Loewenstein

Articles

Much of the scholarship on executive compensation that appears in law reviews assumes that large U.S. corporations overpay their chief executive officers ("CEOs"). This assumption is understandable, as many of these compensation packages are indeed stunning. The question of whether CEOs are overpaid, however, is complicated. Some scholars in other disciplines, principally in economics and management science, have studied the issue but, as this Article demonstrates, this literature does not confirm the assumption. Indeed, some studies suggest that CEO pay is competitive. Moreover, efforts to reduce the level of executive compensation may have the unintended consequence of achieving the ...


Climate Change: The Next Dimension, Lakshman Guruswamy Jan 2000

Climate Change: The Next Dimension, Lakshman Guruswamy

Articles

No abstract provided.


Reasons Within Passions: Emotions And Intentions In Property Rights Bargaining, Peter H. Huang Jan 2000

Reasons Within Passions: Emotions And Intentions In Property Rights Bargaining, Peter H. Huang

Articles

This article discusses the role of emotions (or feelings or affects) in property rights bargaining. Real world people choose bargaining strategies based upon not only rational calculations, but also their gut feelings. This article considers the impact of anger and shame on bargaining over property rights and the Coase theorem. Such emotions may depend on beliefs (expectations or assessments) about whether particular strategic decisions should or will occur. Such beliefs can be viewed as attributions over the intentions of others.


Teaching Corporate Law From An Option Perspective, Peter H. Huang Jan 2000

Teaching Corporate Law From An Option Perspective, Peter H. Huang

Articles

No abstract provided.


Acknowledgments, Jeremy Paul, Pierre Schlag Jan 2000

Acknowledgments, Jeremy Paul, Pierre Schlag

Articles

CLS 2001 Symposium - Critical Legal Studies (Debut de Siecle): A Symposium on Duncan Kennedy's A Critique of Adjudication: Fin de Si├Ęcle (1997).


Book Review, Mark J. Loewenstein Jan 2000

Book Review, Mark J. Loewenstein

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Annihilation Of Sea Turtles: Wto Intransigence And U.S. Equivocation, Lakshman Guruswamy Jan 2000

The Annihilation Of Sea Turtles: Wto Intransigence And U.S. Equivocation, Lakshman Guruswamy

Articles

No abstract provided.


Judges And Federalism: A Comment On "Justice Kennedy's Vision Of Federalism", Robert F. Nagel Jan 2000

Judges And Federalism: A Comment On "Justice Kennedy's Vision Of Federalism", Robert F. Nagel

Articles

No abstract provided.


The United States Supreme Court And Indigenous Peoples: Still A Long Way To Go Toward A Therapeutic Role, S. James Anaya Jan 2000

The United States Supreme Court And Indigenous Peoples: Still A Long Way To Go Toward A Therapeutic Role, S. James Anaya

Articles

No abstract provided.


Environmentalism, Human Rights And Indigenous Peoples: A Tale Of Converging And Diverging Interests, S. James Anaya Jan 2000

Environmentalism, Human Rights And Indigenous Peoples: A Tale Of Converging And Diverging Interests, S. James Anaya

Articles

No abstract provided.


Delaware As Demon: Twenty-Five Years After Professor Cary's Polemic, Mark J. Loewenstein Jan 2000

Delaware As Demon: Twenty-Five Years After Professor Cary's Polemic, Mark J. Loewenstein

Articles

No abstract provided.


Linking Globally, Coping Locally: Cataloging Internet Resources At The University Of Colorado Law Library, Karen Selden Jan 2000

Linking Globally, Coping Locally: Cataloging Internet Resources At The University Of Colorado Law Library, Karen Selden

Articles

Web-based online public access catalogs (OPACs) enable catalogers to provide hotlinks to Internet-based resources of interest to their patrons. However, this capability is not without its challenges. Ms. Selden explores the local policy considerations associated with cataloging Internet resources and describes the policy-making process and some Internet cataloging policies used at the University of Colorado Law Library.


Paradigm Changes In Telecommunications Regulation, Phil Weiser Jan 2000

Paradigm Changes In Telecommunications Regulation, Phil Weiser

Articles

No abstract provided.


A Case Study In The Intersection Of Law And Science: The 1999 Report Of The Committee Of Scientists, Charles F. Wilkinson Jan 2000

A Case Study In The Intersection Of Law And Science: The 1999 Report Of The Committee Of Scientists, Charles F. Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Climb High: High Altitude Mountaineering Lessons For Librarians, Georgia Briscoe Jan 2000

Climb High: High Altitude Mountaineering Lessons For Librarians, Georgia Briscoe

Articles

No abstract provided.


Corporate Finance, Corporate Law And Finance Theory, Peter H. Huang, Michael S. Knoll Jan 2000

Corporate Finance, Corporate Law And Finance Theory, Peter H. Huang, Michael S. Knoll

Articles

No abstract provided.


A Normative Analysis Of New Financially Engineered Derivatives, Peter H. Huang Jan 2000

A Normative Analysis Of New Financially Engineered Derivatives, Peter H. Huang

Articles

This Article analyzes whether the introduction of new derivative assets makes a society better or worse off. Because trading such non-redundant derivatives produces new distributions of income across time and over possible future contingencies, individuals can utilize such financial instruments to hedge risks not possible before the introduction of these assets. Thus, it may seem that new derivatives unambiguously benefit society. In fact, introducing sufficiently many new derivatives completes asset markets. Asset markets are complete if trading on them can attain every possible payoff pattern of wealth across time and over possible future contingencies. The first fundamental theorem of welfare ...