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Full-Text Articles in Law

Law And Literature: 'No Manifesto', James Boyd White Jan 1988

Law And Literature: 'No Manifesto', James Boyd White

Articles

With what hopes and expectations should a lawyer turn to the reading of imaginative literature? To books and articles that purport to connect that literature in some way with the law? In particular, is "law and literature" -to which this Symposium is directed-to be thought of as an academic "field" like law and psychiatry, say, or law and economics? If so, what can it purport to teach us? If not, how is it to be thought of?


Defining The Terms Of Academic Freedom: A Reply To Professor Rabban, Rebecca S. Eisenberg Jan 1988

Defining The Terms Of Academic Freedom: A Reply To Professor Rabban, Rebecca S. Eisenberg

Articles

I suspect Professor Rabban is right in saying that we have more than a semantic dispute. But it is difficult to identify our areas of substantive disagreement with any precision because of a major difference in the meanings that each of us ascribes to certain key words and phrases. The essence of my argument is as follows: What I call "the traditional American conception of academic freedom" justifies professional autonomy for faculty members as a means of furthering certain academic values. But the mechanism of faculty autonomy fails to protect these traditional academic values in the contemporary context of externally ...


Academic Freedom And Academic Values In Sponsored Research, Rebecca S. Eisenberg Jan 1988

Academic Freedom And Academic Values In Sponsored Research, Rebecca S. Eisenberg

Articles

In this Article I examine the traditional American conception of academic freedom and analyze its implications for universities formulating policies on the acceptance of sponsored research. I begin by reviewing the basic policy statements of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) on academic freedom to identify both the academic values implicit in those statements and the assumptions about institutional relationships and individual incentives underlying their prescriptions for advancing those values. I then evaluate the validity of those underlying assumptions in contemporary sponsored research and argue that academic freedom as traditionally conceived might no longer effectively advance academic values in ...