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Articles

1987

University of Washington School of Law

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Guerilla Decisionmaking: Judicial Review Of Risk Assessments, William H. Rodgers, Jr. Jan 1987

Guerilla Decisionmaking: Judicial Review Of Risk Assessments, William H. Rodgers, Jr.

Articles

This paper describes four types of uncertainty confronted by decisionmakers undertaking risk assessments. It then discusses individual and institutional responses to uncertainty; these include both formal attempts to acquire more information, and pragmatic efforts to isolate and act upon salient considerations. The tendency of decisionmakers to narrow the agenda and search for a decisive datum or metaphor is called guerilla decisionmaking. Courts oversee agency decisions by techniques known widely in the legal community as the hard-look doctrine. This doctrine is defined, and the case law is used to illustrate how courts insist upon identification of salient risk-assessment factors and the ...


A Book Review—Or What You Never Wanted To Know About Bibliographies, Penny A. Hazelton Jan 1987

A Book Review—Or What You Never Wanted To Know About Bibliographies, Penny A. Hazelton

Articles

Reviewing Joe Stephens, Law, Natural Resources, and Land Use: The Environmental Collection of the Paul L. Boley Law Library (1986).


The Varieties Of Numerical Remedies, Eric Schnapper Jan 1987

The Varieties Of Numerical Remedies, Eric Schnapper

Articles

This article seeks to provide a coherent account of why the federal courts have used numerical remedies and an analysis of the types of cases in which they should do so.

Part I describes the evolution of court ordered numerical remedies in Title VII and other employment cases and discusses the appellate courts' failure to establish any clear standards for adopting and framing such remedies. Part II argues that this lack of a coherent set of standards is due to a failure to recognize that the lower courts have been utilizing numerical remedies in six quite distinct types of cases ...