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Michigan's First Woman Lawyer: Sarah Killgore Wertman, Margaret A. Leary Mar 2006

Michigan's First Woman Lawyer: Sarah Killgore Wertman, Margaret A. Leary

Articles

Sarah Killgore Wertman was the first woman in the country to both graduate from law school and be admitted to the bar. Thus, she was Michigan's first woman lawyer in two senses: She was the first woman to graduate from the University of Michigan Law School, and the first woman admitted to the Michigan bar. Others preceded her in entering law school, graduating from law school, or being admitted to the bar, but she was the first to accomplish all three. Her story illustrates much about the early days of women in legal education and the practice of law ...


Admission To The Bar, Edwin C. Goddard Jan 1918

Admission To The Bar, Edwin C. Goddard

Articles

This article is written in the belief that the hour is here when some changes in admissions to the bar should be urged and urged again, when some things often thought and discussed in certain assemblies should be openly and frankly talked over with the profession at large.


Should Applicants For Admission To The Bar Be Required To Take A Law School Course?, Henry M. Bates Jan 1915

Should Applicants For Admission To The Bar Be Required To Take A Law School Course?, Henry M. Bates

Articles

If the requirements for admission to the bar had been advanced in any thing like equal degree with the progress made in law schools, there would be unqualified reasons for rejoicing in the prospect. Unfortunately, however, this is far from the case, though some notable advances even in this respect have been made. It is remarkable and unfortunate that in America and in Great Britain, whose system of law is undoubtedly the most difficult of all systems in the world to master, we require no institutional or school training of the men who are to fill the important functions of ...


A Four Year Course In Law, Henry M. Bates Jan 1915

A Four Year Course In Law, Henry M. Bates

Articles

In the February, 1914, number of The Alumnus, devoted in part to the Michigan Law School, some account was given of the large number of new courses which had been added recently to the curriculum. The courses commented upon in that discussion, besides one advanced course in procedure, deal mainly with what may be called extra-legal or at least extra-professional subjects, such as the History of English Law, the Philosophy of Law and advanced courses in Roman Law and Jurisprudence. Prior to this period of expansion in the law curriculum many other additions had been made to the list of ...


Embarrassments To Legal Education, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1892

Embarrassments To Legal Education, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

In European countries a student is not allowed to undertake the study of law until he has received a degree equivalent to the A. B. degree in American colleges, and the minimum term of study is three years, and in some cases four or even five years are required. With some mortification, we recognize that the profession of law in this country has not approximated this high standard.


Law Schools And Legal Education, Henry W. Rogers Jan 1888

Law Schools And Legal Education, Henry W. Rogers

Articles

In the February number of the AMERICAN LAW REGISTER, there appeared an interesting article from the pen of Mr. Henry Budd, discussing the relation of law schools to legal education. The motive which inspired the writing of the article, was a commendable one, and the desire of the writer to have a higher standard established, governing admissions to the bar, will be quite generally concurred in. No one could read the article in question, however, without readily perceiving that the law schools of the United States were considered to be, in large measure, responsible for the admission to the bar ...