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John Marshall Law School

2012

Judges

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

We, The Judges: The Legalized Subject And Narratives Of Adjudication In Reality Television, 81 Umkc L. Rev. 1 (2012), Cynthia D. Bond Jan 2012

We, The Judges: The Legalized Subject And Narratives Of Adjudication In Reality Television, 81 Umkc L. Rev. 1 (2012), Cynthia D. Bond

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

At first a cultural oddity, reality television is now a cultural commonplace. These quasi-documentaries proliferate on a wide range of network and cable channels, proving adaptable to any audience demographic. Across a variety of types of "reality" offerings, narratives of adjudication replete with "judges," "juries," and "verdicts"-abound. Do these judgment formations simply reflect the often competitive structure or subtext of reality TV? Or is there a deeper, more constitutive connection between reality TV as a genre and narratives of law and adjudication? This article looks beyond the many "judge shows" popular on reality TV (e.g., Judge Judy') to ...


New Law, Old Cases, Fair Outcomes: Why The Illinois Supreme Court Must Overrule People V Flowers, 43 Loy. U. Chi. L.J. 727 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill Jan 2012

New Law, Old Cases, Fair Outcomes: Why The Illinois Supreme Court Must Overrule People V Flowers, 43 Loy. U. Chi. L.J. 727 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Law And The Argumentative Theory, 90 Or. L. Rev. 837 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill Jan 2012

Law And The Argumentative Theory, 90 Or. L. Rev. 837 (2012), Timothy P. O'Neill

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

Like many law professors, I have coached my share of moot court teams. As you probably know, in most competitions students either choose or are assigned one side of the case to brief. But for the oral argument segment of the competition, students must argue both sides of the case, “on-brief” and “off-brief,” often in alternate rounds.

At the end of a competition, with their heads still swimming with arguments and counterarguments, students will sometimes ask, “OK, so can you tell us which is the correct side?” I always say, “Of course I can. . . . The correct side is always the ...