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Series

Columbia Law School

Columbia Law Review

1997

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

William J. Brennan, Jr., Peter L. Strauss Jan 1997

William J. Brennan, Jr., Peter L. Strauss

Faculty Scholarship

When I was privileged to be Justice Brennan's law clerk, he had not yet earned even from his own law school the affection and respect that have prompted the editors of this law review, and doubtless many others, to offer an issue in dedication to him. In the three decades following, he made his claim to both unmistakably clear. His extraordinary tenure on the Court produced 1360 opinions, spread over the last 146 of the Court's first 497 volumes. Nearly a decade after his retirement, it is probably still the case that more opinions in constitutional law teaching ...


William J. Brennan, Jr., American – In Memoriam, Gerard E. Lynch Jan 1997

William J. Brennan, Jr., American – In Memoriam, Gerard E. Lynch

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The New Estates, Lance Liebman Jan 1997

The New Estates, Lance Liebman

Faculty Scholarship

Telecommunications Law is under pressure from fast-paced technological advances and changes in the industry structure. As the high-stakes debates plays itself out in federal and state legislatures, agencies and courts, the academic study is struggling to catch up. The author poses provocative questions about the present and future of Telecommunications Law. Of paramount interest are the ill-fitting legal categories that continue to influence crucial determinations about the level of First Amendment protection accorded various communications media, and the reach of Constitutional Takings doctrine that pits incumbent regulated industries against government regulators and up-start competitors looking to shake-up the established order ...


The Net Profits Puzzle, Victor P. Goldberg Jan 1997

The Net Profits Puzzle, Victor P. Goldberg

Faculty Scholarship

The use of "net profits" clauses in the movie business poses a problem. The standard perception is that Hollywood accounting results in successful films showing no net profits. If that is indeed so, then why have they survived for over four decades? This Essay argues that a successful movie will fail to yield net profits only if a "gross participant" (a major star whose compensation is in part a function of the film's gross receipts) becomes associated with the film. Since the net profits participants typically are associated with a project first, the question becomes: Why would they be ...