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Series

Columbia Law School

1990

Rule of Law

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

When The Judge Is Not The Primary Official With Responsibility To Read: Agency Interpretation And The Problem Of Legislative History, Peter L. Strauss Jan 1990

When The Judge Is Not The Primary Official With Responsibility To Read: Agency Interpretation And The Problem Of Legislative History, Peter L. Strauss

Faculty Scholarship

As the other pages of this journal reflect, writing about statutory interpretation commonly builds on unarticulated assumptions about the occasion for interpretation, the identity of the interpreter, and the character of the interpreted text. In this paradigm, the occasion for interpretation is a litigated case – an episode has occurred for which the application of the statute is problematic. The interpreter is a judge, a person who resolves litigation – typically episodic, typically backwards – working outside of politics, and bearing no generic responsibility (that is, responsibility outside the decision of the case before her) for the statutory regime. And the interpreted text ...


What's Next?: The Future Of Rico, G. Robert Blakey, John C. Coffee Jr., Paul E. Coffey, L. Gordon Crovitz Jan 1990

What's Next?: The Future Of Rico, G. Robert Blakey, John C. Coffee Jr., Paul E. Coffey, L. Gordon Crovitz

Faculty Scholarship

Opening Statement of Mr. Crovitz: Coming to the Notre Dame Law School to debate Robert Blakey on the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations law makes me feel like Daniel approaching the lion's den. I'm tempted to offer my own prayer, "Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no RICO."


The Rule Of Law And The Two Realms Of Welfare Administration, William H. Simon Jan 1990

The Rule Of Law And The Two Realms Of Welfare Administration, William H. Simon

Faculty Scholarship

Although it was not the first case in which the Supreme Court upheld a welfare claim, Goldberg v. Kelly is often thought of as the case that extended the rule of law to the welfare system. In doing so, it repudiated the "right/privilege" distinction that would confine procedural protections of economic interests to private law claims.

But Goldberg did not challenge basic assumptions about the nature of procedural fairness that the legal culture had developed principally in connection with private law claims. Its conception of fairness focused on claims initiated by individuals for relief for themselves, and on an ...