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Series

Boston College Law School

Banking and Finance Law

Commercial Law

2006

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Language, Deals And Standards: The Future Of Xml Contracts, Lawrence A. Cunningham May 2006

Language, Deals And Standards: The Future Of Xml Contracts, Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

eXtensible Markup Language (XML) structures information in documentary systems ranging from financial reports to medical records and business contracts. XML standards for specific applications are developed spontaneously by self-appointed technologists or entrepreneurs. XML’s social and economic stakes are considerable, especially when developed for the private law of contracts. XML can reduce transaction costs but also limit the range of contractual expression and redefine the nature of law practice. So reliance on spontaneous development may be sub-optimal and identification of a more formal public standard setting model necessary. To exploit XML’s advantages while minimizing risks, this Article envisions creating ...


Conflict Of Laws For Transactions In Securities Held Through Intermediaries, James S. Rogers Apr 2006

Conflict Of Laws For Transactions In Securities Held Through Intermediaries, James S. Rogers

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The evolution of the modern system of securities holding through intermediaries poses particularly difficult conflict of laws issues. The traditional approach to conflict of laws suggests that the law governing a transaction in securities is determined by the location of the securities; yet under modern conditions it is difficult in practice, if not impossible in theory, to determine that location. A recent project of the Hague Conference on Private International Law has confronted these problems and devised a workable, modern approach. For any such project to succeed, lawyers must be willing to abandon traditional concepts of conflict of laws such ...