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Partial Privatization Of Social Security: Assessing Its Effect On Women, Minorities, And Lower-Income Workers, Kathryn L. Moore Apr 2000

Partial Privatization Of Social Security: Assessing Its Effect On Women, Minorities, And Lower-Income Workers, Kathryn L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Once viewed as the “third rail” of politics, Social Security appears to be moving inexorably toward reform. In his 1998 State of the Union address, President Clinton proclaimed strengthening Social Security a high priority and called for bipartisan forums on Social Security reform to be held throughout the United States. Similarly, following the 1998 November elections, congressional leaders expressed commitment to “saving Society Security,” and House Ways and Means Chairman Bill Archer renewed his commitment to bipartisan reform of Social Security as recently as December 8, 1999 in a letter to President Clinton. Congressional hearings on reform proposals are ubiquitous ...


Adoption Laws And Practices In 2000: Serving Whose Interests?, Ruth-Arlene W. Howe Jan 2000

Adoption Laws And Practices In 2000: Serving Whose Interests?, Ruth-Arlene W. Howe

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

After enactment of the first modern state adoption statute in 1851, adoption in the United States evolved as both a state judicial process and a specialized child welfare service to promote the best interest of children in need of permanent homes. This essay reviews developments during the last quarter of the century that force us to ask whether U.S. adoption is meeting the needs of children, its original child welfare intent, or serving the interests of adults.