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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Law

Unbending Gender: Why Family And Work Conflict And What To Do About It (Panel Two: Who's Minding The Baby?), Nancy E. Dowd, Adrienne Davis, Marion Crain, Bonnie Dill, Catherine Ross, Joan Williams Aug 2000

Unbending Gender: Why Family And Work Conflict And What To Do About It (Panel Two: Who's Minding The Baby?), Nancy E. Dowd, Adrienne Davis, Marion Crain, Bonnie Dill, Catherine Ross, Joan Williams

UF Law Faculty Publications

A central characteristic of our current gender arrangements is that they pit ideal worker women against marginalized caregiver women in a series of patterned conflicts I call gender wars. One version of these are the mommy wars that we see often covered in the press between employed mothers and mothers at home. Employed mothers at times participate in the belittlement commonly felt by homemakers. Also mothers at home, I think, at times participate in the guilt-tripping that's often felt by mothers who are employed. These gender wars are a central but little understood characteristic of the gender system that ...


Gender And Privacy In Cyberspace, Anita L. Allen May 2000

Gender And Privacy In Cyberspace, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Partial Privatization Of Social Security: Assessing Its Effect On Women, Minorities, And Lower-Income Workers, Kathryn L. Moore Apr 2000

Partial Privatization Of Social Security: Assessing Its Effect On Women, Minorities, And Lower-Income Workers, Kathryn L. Moore

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Once viewed as the “third rail” of politics, Social Security appears to be moving inexorably toward reform. In his 1998 State of the Union address, President Clinton proclaimed strengthening Social Security a high priority and called for bipartisan forums on Social Security reform to be held throughout the United States. Similarly, following the 1998 November elections, congressional leaders expressed commitment to “saving Society Security,” and House Ways and Means Chairman Bill Archer renewed his commitment to bipartisan reform of Social Security as recently as December 8, 1999 in a letter to President Clinton. Congressional hearings on reform proposals are ubiquitous ...


Biology For Feminists, Katharine K. Baker Feb 2000

Biology For Feminists, Katharine K. Baker

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Muslim Women's Rights In The Global Village: Challenges And Opportunities, Azizah Y. Al-Hibri Jan 2000

Muslim Women's Rights In The Global Village: Challenges And Opportunities, Azizah Y. Al-Hibri

Law Faculty Publications

In this age of information technology that shrank our world into a global village, it is fair to ask how this recent development has impacted Muslim women's rights across the world. Having just traveled through nine Muslim countries, ranging from Pakistan and Bangladesh to the Gulf States, Egypt, Syria, and Lebanon, I would answer that it is leading, slowly but surely, to reassessment and change.' Attempts to accelerate the pace of this change, however, without full understanding of its complex topology, and the deep-rooted commitment by most Muslim women to spiritual and cultural authenticity, could halt or even reverse ...


Deconstructing Patriarchal Jurisprudence In Islamic Law: A Faithful Approach, Azizah Y. Al-Hibri Jan 2000

Deconstructing Patriarchal Jurisprudence In Islamic Law: A Faithful Approach, Azizah Y. Al-Hibri

Law Faculty Publications

Global Critical Race Feminism is the first anthology to focus explicitly on the legal rights of women of color around the world. Containing nearly thirty essays, the book addresses such topical themes as responses to white feminism; the flashpoint issue of female genital mutilation; the intersections of international law with U.S. law; "Third World" women in the "First World;" violence against women; and the global workplace.


Adoption Laws And Practices In 2000: Serving Whose Interests?, Ruth-Arlene W. Howe Jan 2000

Adoption Laws And Practices In 2000: Serving Whose Interests?, Ruth-Arlene W. Howe

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

After enactment of the first modern state adoption statute in 1851, adoption in the United States evolved as both a state judicial process and a specialized child welfare service to promote the best interest of children in need of permanent homes. This essay reviews developments during the last quarter of the century that force us to ask whether U.S. adoption is meeting the needs of children, its original child welfare intent, or serving the interests of adults.


The Difference In Women’S Hedonic Lives: A Phenomenological Critique Of Feminist Legal Theory, Robin West Jan 2000

The Difference In Women’S Hedonic Lives: A Phenomenological Critique Of Feminist Legal Theory, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Part One of this article provides a phenomenological and hedonic critique of the conception of the human - and thus the female - that underlies liberal legal feminism. Part Two presents a phenomenological critique of the conception of the human - and thus the female - which underlies radical feminist legal criticism. Again, I will argue that in both cases the theory does not pay enough attention to feminism: liberal feminist legal theory owes more to liberalism than to feminism and radical feminist legal theory owes more to radicalism than it does to feminism. Both models accept a depiction of human nature which is ...