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Full-Text Articles in Law

2000 Amendments To Colorado Utes Settlement Act Of 1988, United States 106th Congress Dec 2000

2000 Amendments To Colorado Utes Settlement Act Of 1988, United States 106th Congress

Native American Water Rights Settlement Project

Federal Legislation: Colorado Ute Indian Water Rights Settlement Act Amendments of 2000 in Consolidated Appropriations Act of Dec. 21, 2001 (PL 106-554, Appendix D, Title III, 114 Stat. 2763A-258 ). The timetable set forth in the Settlement Agreement has not been met. The irrigation water provisions cannot be met due to Endangered Species Act, biological opinions and Federal Water Pollution Control Act requirements which reduce the amount that can be drawn from the Animas and La Plata Rivers. The facilities and amount of water must be significantly reduced. To compensate the Tribes, capital costs are waived and funds for natural resource ...


To Know A Veil, Douglas C. Michael Oct 2000

To Know A Veil, Douglas C. Michael

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Lawyers, judges, law students, and law professors have a love-hate relationship with the doctrine of “piercing the corporate veil”—the idea that shareholders might sometimes be personally liable for the debts of the corporation. It is the subject covered more than all others in courses on corporation law. It is widely litigated, being the subject of thousands of opinions. Yet, for all this attention, it is routinely vilified by the experts. Most commentators recognize that it is jurisprudence without substance.

This Article is an attempt to form a basis for rigorous analysis of virtually every veil-piercing case and to rid ...


A Reply To Professor Tobias, Peter A. Appel Apr 2000

A Reply To Professor Tobias, Peter A. Appel

Scholarly Works

In his response to my article, Intervention in Public Law Litigation: The Environmental Paradigm, Professor Carl Tobias finds much to commend and much to criticize, and he offers a “friendly critique” of my article. I thank Professor Tobias for taking the time to respond to my article, and I hope that this response furthers the dialogue on this important subject.


Who Should Control The Decision To Call A Witness: Respecting A Criminal Defendant's Tactical Choices, Rodney J. Uphoff Apr 2000

Who Should Control The Decision To Call A Witness: Respecting A Criminal Defendant's Tactical Choices, Rodney J. Uphoff

Faculty Publications

A law student approached me not long ago to discuss a problem he had encountered while helping to prepare a criminal case for retrial. The defendant's first trial ended with a hung jury. The defendant, Steven Brown, now faced a second trial on the same misdemeanor charge of assaulting a police officer. Although the defendant still wanted to go to trial, Brown told defense counsel that he did not want his elderly father to have to testify again. From defense counsel's standpoint, the father's testimony was critical because he was the only witness corroborating the defendant's ...


New Developments In Scientific Evidence, Paul C. Giannelli Jan 2000

New Developments In Scientific Evidence, Paul C. Giannelli

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Expert Qualifications: Traps For The Unwary, Paul C. Giannelli Jan 2000

Expert Qualifications: Traps For The Unwary, Paul C. Giannelli

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Inevitability Of The Eclectic: Liberating Adr From Ideology, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2000

The Inevitability Of The Eclectic: Liberating Adr From Ideology, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

The problem with viewing facilitation as the only legitimate form of mediation, of course, is that it borders on tautology: mediation is nonevaluative, therefore any evaluation in mediation must be impermissible. Although this view remains strongly held in many quarters, it appears to be in retreat, both within the mediation community and in the legal community at large. Courts and commentators have shown increasing favor toward some evaluative or advising component of mediation. More important, the eclectic style appears to be what takes place in the metaphorical trenches of mediation practice (although sound empirical data is necessarily hard to obtain ...


Protecting Franchisees From Abusive Arbitration Clauses, Jean R. Sternlight Jan 2000

Protecting Franchisees From Abusive Arbitration Clauses, Jean R. Sternlight

Scholarly Works

This article sets out a number of legal arguments that franchisees can potentially use to defeat arbitration clauses that seek to accomplish ends that would not be permissible in litigation. Drawing from decisions protecting consumers and employees from unfair arbitration clauses, as well as from opinions in the franchise context, this article analyzes arguments that can be based on the U.S. Constitution, federal statutes, state statutes, and common law. By way of this analysis, it suggests that some courts are misapplying arbitration precedents and preemption arguments to support decisions that allow franchisors to effectively exempt themselves from legislation and ...


Is Binding Arbitration A Form Of Adr?: An Argument That The Term "Adr" Has Begun To Outlive Its Usefulness, Jean R. Sternlight Jan 2000

Is Binding Arbitration A Form Of Adr?: An Argument That The Term "Adr" Has Begun To Outlive Its Usefulness, Jean R. Sternlight

Scholarly Works

Professor Frank Sander has, for many years, been one of the most prescient commentators on the alternative dispute resolution ("ADR") movement. His 1976 Pound Conference speech has been identified by many as marking the birth of the modern ADR phenomena. That speech, which compared some of the pros and cons of litigation and an array of other dispute resolution processes, has been summarized as proposing the concept of the "multi-door courthouse." In contrast, Professor Sander's more recent and very interesting review of the present and future of ADR makes little attempt to distinguish between mediation and binding arbitration, the ...


Introduction, Anthony J. Scirica Jan 2000

Introduction, Anthony J. Scirica

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Quiet Demise Of Deference To Custom: Malpractice Law At The Millenium, Philip G. Peters Jr. Jan 2000

The Quiet Demise Of Deference To Custom: Malpractice Law At The Millenium, Philip G. Peters Jr.

Faculty Publications

According to conventional wisdom, tort law allows physicians to set their own standard of care. While defendants in ordinary tort actions are expected to exercise reasonable care under the circumstances, physicians traditionally have needed only to conform to the customs of their peers. However, judicial deference to physician customs is eroding. Gradually, quietly and relentlessly, state courts are withdrawing this legal privilege. Already, a dozen states have expressly rejected deference to medical customs and another nine, although not directly addressing the role of custom, have rephrased their standard of care in terms of the reasonable physician, rather than compliance with ...


Dialogue On State Action, Martin A. Schwartz, Erwin Chemerinsky Jan 2000

Dialogue On State Action, Martin A. Schwartz, Erwin Chemerinsky

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Municipal Ethics Remain A Hot Topic In Litigation: A 1999 Survey Of Issues In Ethics For Municipal Lawyers, Patricia E. Salkin Jan 2000

Municipal Ethics Remain A Hot Topic In Litigation: A 1999 Survey Of Issues In Ethics For Municipal Lawyers, Patricia E. Salkin

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Twins At Birth: Civil Rights And The Role Of The Solicitor General, Seth P. Waxman Jan 2000

Twins At Birth: Civil Rights And The Role Of The Solicitor General, Seth P. Waxman

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

It is painful even today to contemplate the awful devastation wreaked upon this nation by the War Between the States. But like most cataclysms, the Civil War also gave birth to some important positive developments. I would like to talk with you today about two such offspring of that war, and the extent to which, like many sibling pairs, they have influenced each other's development. The first child - the most well-known progeny of the Civil War - was this country's commitment to civil rights. The war, of course, ended slavery. But it did not - and could not - change the ...


Teaching Corporate Governance Through Shareholder Litigation, Jill E. Fisch Jan 2000

Teaching Corporate Governance Through Shareholder Litigation, Jill E. Fisch

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Incentives To Settle Under Joint And Several Liability: An Empirical Analysis Of Superfund Litigation, Howard F. Chang, Hilary Sigman Jan 2000

Incentives To Settle Under Joint And Several Liability: An Empirical Analysis Of Superfund Litigation, Howard F. Chang, Hilary Sigman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Congress may soon restrict joint and several liability for cleanup of contaminated sites under Superfund. We explore whether this change would discourage settlements and is therefore likely to increase the program 's already high litigation costs per site. Recent theoretical research by Kornhauser and Revesz finds that joint and several liability may either encourage or discourage settlement, depending on the correlation of outcomes at trial across defendants. We extend their two-defendant model to a richer framework with N defendants. This extension allows us to test the theoretical model empirically using data on Superfund litigation. We find that joint and several ...


A Report Card On The Impeachment: Judging The Institutions That Judged President Clinton, Susan Low Bloch Jan 2000

A Report Card On The Impeachment: Judging The Institutions That Judged President Clinton, Susan Low Bloch

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Now that we have lived through one of the most unusual events in American history-the impeachment and trial of the President of the United States-it is appropriate, indeed essential, that we assess how the process worked and learn what we can from it. Specifically, I want to address two questions: First, how well did the impeachment process work? In good academic fashion, I will grade each of the governmental institutions involved – giving them, if you will, a report card. Second, what did we learn from the experience to guide us if, in the future, we face the impeachment of a ...


Adrift On The Sea Of Indeterminacy, Michael H. Gottesman Jan 2000

Adrift On The Sea Of Indeterminacy, Michael H. Gottesman

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Today's conflicts scholars no doubt consider themselves a diverse bunch, with widely differing views about how law should be chosen in multistate disputes. But from the trenches, most of them look alike. Each waxes eloquent about the search for the perfect solution-the most intellectually and morally satisfying choice of law for each dispute-and each ends the theorizing by embracing some proposition that will prove wholly indeterminate in practice.