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2000

Dispute Resolution and Arbitration

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Apology And Organizations: Exploring An Example From Medical Practice, Jonathan R. Cohen Jun 2000

Apology And Organizations: Exploring An Example From Medical Practice, Jonathan R. Cohen

UF Law Faculty Publications

In this Article, I focus on injuries committed by members of organizations, such as corporations, and examine distinct issues raised by apology in the organizational setting. In particular, I consider: (i) the process of learning to prevent future errors; (ii) the divergent interests stemming from principal-agent tensions in employment, risk preferences and sources of insurance; (iii) the non-pecuniary benefits to corporate morale, productivity and reputation; (iv) the standing and scope of apologies; and (v) the articulation of policies toward injuries to others.


Getting The Faith: Why Business Lawyers And Executives Believe In Mediation, John M. Lande Apr 2000

Getting The Faith: Why Business Lawyers And Executives Believe In Mediation, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

Do you believe in mediation? That may seem like an odd question. Normally one thinks of ‘believing in‘ (or having faith in) things like magic, God, or the market. These are typically things that are beyond verifiable human knowledge (such as magic and God) and/or deeply held values (such as whether the market is a better mechanism than government for managing the flow of goods and services). At first blush, one might not think that mediation would fall into either category. There have been numerous empirical studies about many different aspects of mediation, so one can confidently say, for ...


Dispute Resolution In Cyberspace: Demand For New Forms Of Adr, Henry H. Perritt Jr. Mar 2000

Dispute Resolution In Cyberspace: Demand For New Forms Of Adr, Henry H. Perritt Jr.

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


German Law Paves The Way For Mandatory Mediation, Nadja Alexander Feb 2000

German Law Paves The Way For Mandatory Mediation, Nadja Alexander

Research Collection School Of Law

Effective as of 1 January 2000, the Federal Government of Germany has introduced legislation permitting all German states (Laender) to introduce mandatory court-connected mediation with respect to certain kinds of civil disputes.


Arbitration And Judicial Review, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 2000

Arbitration And Judicial Review, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Other Publications

A quarter century ago, in a presentation at the Academy's annual meeting, I used the phrase "contract reader" to characterize the role an arbitrator plays in construing a collective bargaining agreement. That two-word phrase may be the only thing I ever said before this body that has been remembered. Unfortunately, it is almost invariably misunderstood. Time and again members have reproached me: "What's the big deal about contract reading, anyway? Isn't it just the same as contract interpretation?" Or, more substantively scathing: "Do you really think, Ted, that all you have to do to interpret a labor ...


Mandatory Arbitration: Bane Or Boon?, Theodore St. Antoine Jan 2000

Mandatory Arbitration: Bane Or Boon?, Theodore St. Antoine

Other Publications

Buy a new car that turns out to be a lemon and you may find you can't sue. Fine print in the sales contract often restricts you to arbitration. That means presenting your case before a private person instead of a judge and jury. And the arbitrator may be someone drawn from a panel compiled by the car seller.


Understanding Conflict And Human Capacity: The Role Of Premises In Mediation Training, Robert A. Baruch Bush, Sally G. Pope Jan 2000

Understanding Conflict And Human Capacity: The Role Of Premises In Mediation Training, Robert A. Baruch Bush, Sally G. Pope

Hofstra Law Faculty Scholarship

In this article, the authors, point out that underlying mediator practices and techniques, there are deeper premises and values that guide and shape practice. The authors argue that mediation training should include articulation and explanation of the premises that underlie the transformative orientation to mediation practice and give examples of how these premises can be conveyed within an overall training design, and how doing so enriches the teaching of skills and techniques themselves.


The Inevitability Of The Eclectic: Liberating Adr From Ideology, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2000

The Inevitability Of The Eclectic: Liberating Adr From Ideology, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

The problem with viewing facilitation as the only legitimate form of mediation, of course, is that it borders on tautology: mediation is nonevaluative, therefore any evaluation in mediation must be impermissible. Although this view remains strongly held in many quarters, it appears to be in retreat, both within the mediation community and in the legal community at large. Courts and commentators have shown increasing favor toward some evaluative or advising component of mediation. More important, the eclectic style appears to be what takes place in the metaphorical trenches of mediation practice (although sound empirical data is necessarily hard to obtain ...


Reasons Within Passions: Emotions And Intentions In Property Rights Bargaining, Peter H. Huang Jan 2000

Reasons Within Passions: Emotions And Intentions In Property Rights Bargaining, Peter H. Huang

Articles

This article discusses the role of emotions (or feelings or affects) in property rights bargaining. Real world people choose bargaining strategies based upon not only rational calculations, but also their gut feelings. This article considers the impact of anger and shame on bargaining over property rights and the Coase theorem. Such emotions may depend on beliefs (expectations or assessments) about whether particular strategic decisions should or will occur. Such beliefs can be viewed as attributions over the intentions of others.


Constitutional Gravity: A Unitary Theory Of Alternative Dispute Resolution And Public Civil Justice, Richard C. Reuben Jan 2000

Constitutional Gravity: A Unitary Theory Of Alternative Dispute Resolution And Public Civil Justice, Richard C. Reuben

Faculty Publications

Under the traditional bipolar model, civil dispute resolution is generally divided into two spheres: trial, which is public in nature and therefore subject to constitutional due process, and alternative dispute resolution (ADR), which is private in nature and therefore not subject to such constraints. In this article, Professor Richard Reuben proposes a unitary understanding of public civil dispute resolution, one that recognizes that ADR is often energized by state action and thus is constitutionally required to comply with minimal but meaningful due process standards. Depending upon the process, such standards might include the right to an impartial forum, the right ...


Judicial Review Of Arbitration Awards On Public Policy Grounds: Lessons From The Case Law, Ann C. Hodges Jan 2000

Judicial Review Of Arbitration Awards On Public Policy Grounds: Lessons From The Case Law, Ann C. Hodges

Law Faculty Publications

A review of the case law demonstrates that most of the labor arbitration awards challenged on public policy grounds involve reinstatement of discharged employees. This article analyzes 138 private sector federal cases in which labor arbitration ·awards have been contested on public policy grounds. All the cases reviewed are discharge cases in which arbitration awards reversing the terminations were challenged. The article attempts to determine the factors that influence courts to uphold or overturn arbitration awards. This analysis will provide assistance to arbitrators in writing opinions that are less subject to challenge, and to employers, unions, and their attorneys in ...


Ph.D. In Dispute Resolution Student Handbook, Nova Southeastern University Jan 2000

Ph.D. In Dispute Resolution Student Handbook, Nova Southeastern University

College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Course Catalogs

No abstract provided.


School Of Social And Systemic Studies Catalog 2000-2001, Nova Southeastern University Jan 2000

School Of Social And Systemic Studies Catalog 2000-2001, Nova Southeastern University

College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Course Catalogs

No abstract provided.


The Annihilation Of Sea Turtles: Wto Intransigence And U.S. Equivocation, Lakshman Guruswamy Jan 2000

The Annihilation Of Sea Turtles: Wto Intransigence And U.S. Equivocation, Lakshman Guruswamy

Articles

No abstract provided.


Promoting The Best Interests Of Children Whose Parents Are Divorcing: The Next Steps For Arkansas, Kenneth S. Gallant Jan 2000

Promoting The Best Interests Of Children Whose Parents Are Divorcing: The Next Steps For Arkansas, Kenneth S. Gallant

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


International Commercial Arbitration: A Case Study Of The Areas Under Control Of The Palestinian Authority, Marshall J. Breger Jan 2000

International Commercial Arbitration: A Case Study Of The Areas Under Control Of The Palestinian Authority, Marshall J. Breger

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

One necessary component to the success of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process is economic development and growth in the area under the control of the Palestinian Authority (PA). One of the principal requirements for economic growth, and quite possibly for the Palestinian Authority's economic survival, is foreign investment in the West Bank and Gaza (WBG). As they currently exist, laws concerning foreign investment in WBG are a quagmire. Indeed, it is a challenge for an investor to simply identify which law applies to which area, let alone to interpret the law. At the same time many of the protections often ...


Incentives To Settle Under Joint And Several Liability: An Empirical Analysis Of Superfund Litigation, Howard F. Chang, Hilary Sigman Jan 2000

Incentives To Settle Under Joint And Several Liability: An Empirical Analysis Of Superfund Litigation, Howard F. Chang, Hilary Sigman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Congress may soon restrict joint and several liability for cleanup of contaminated sites under Superfund. We explore whether this change would discourage settlements and is therefore likely to increase the program 's already high litigation costs per site. Recent theoretical research by Kornhauser and Revesz finds that joint and several liability may either encourage or discourage settlement, depending on the correlation of outcomes at trial across defendants. We extend their two-defendant model to a richer framework with N defendants. This extension allows us to test the theoretical model empirically using data on Superfund litigation. We find that joint and several ...


Adr, The Judiciary And Justice: Coming To Terms With The Alternatives, Erin Ryan Jan 2000

Adr, The Judiciary And Justice: Coming To Terms With The Alternatives, Erin Ryan

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Alternative Dispute Resolution And The Potential For Gender Bias, Leigh S. Goodmark Jan 2000

Alternative Dispute Resolution And The Potential For Gender Bias, Leigh S. Goodmark

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


As Mandatory Binding Arbitration Meets The Class Action, Will The Class Action Survive?, Jean R. Sternlight Jan 2000

As Mandatory Binding Arbitration Meets The Class Action, Will The Class Action Survive?, Jean R. Sternlight

Scholarly Works

Assuming that the traditional prerequisites for a class action have been met, courts have four choices: (1) order the dispute to be resolved in an individualized arbitration, thereby denying plaintiffs either a litigation or arbitration venue for their class claims; (2) refuse to mandate arbitration, and instead allow plaintiffs to litigate their class claims; (3) order that the dispute be resolved through an arbitral class action, also known as classwide arbitration; or (4) order the dispute to arbitration but allow the arbitrators to make the determination as to whether the dispute should be resolved individually or on a class basis ...


Resolving Workplace Disputes In The United States: The Growth Of Alternative Dispute Resolution In Employment Relations, David B. Lipsky, Ronald L. Seeber Jan 2000

Resolving Workplace Disputes In The United States: The Growth Of Alternative Dispute Resolution In Employment Relations, David B. Lipsky, Ronald L. Seeber

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] For more than a decade a "quiet revolution" has been occurring m the American system of justice. There has been a dramatic growth in the use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) to resolve disputes that might otherwise be handled through litigation. We define ADR as the use of any form of mediation or arbitration as a substitute for the public judicial or administrative process available to resolve a dispute (Lipsky and Seeber, 1998A}. In the United States mediation, arbitration, and their variants ordinarily are private processes in which the disputants themselves select, hire, and pay the third-party neutral who ...


Identifying Real Dichotomies Underlying The False Dichotomy: Twenty-First Century Mediation In An Eclectic Regime, Jeffrey W. Stempel Jan 2000

Identifying Real Dichotomies Underlying The False Dichotomy: Twenty-First Century Mediation In An Eclectic Regime, Jeffrey W. Stempel

Scholarly Works

Some people (lawyers, scholars, judges, dispute resolvers, policymakers) are more concerned about fidelity to procedural protocols while others are more concerned with the substantive rules governing disputes and substantive outcomes. Those in the dispute resolution community preferring facilitation tend to be proceduralists. For them, the observance of proper procedure is a high goal, perhaps the dominant goal. They reason, often implicitly, that adherence to the rules of procedure is the essence of neutrality, fairness, and the proper role of a dispute resolving apparatus. At some level, usually subconscious, there is a post-modern philosophical aspect of this preference. Because humans cannot ...


Protecting Franchisees From Abusive Arbitration Clauses, Jean R. Sternlight Jan 2000

Protecting Franchisees From Abusive Arbitration Clauses, Jean R. Sternlight

Scholarly Works

This article sets out a number of legal arguments that franchisees can potentially use to defeat arbitration clauses that seek to accomplish ends that would not be permissible in litigation. Drawing from decisions protecting consumers and employees from unfair arbitration clauses, as well as from opinions in the franchise context, this article analyzes arguments that can be based on the U.S. Constitution, federal statutes, state statutes, and common law. By way of this analysis, it suggests that some courts are misapplying arbitration precedents and preemption arguments to support decisions that allow franchisors to effectively exempt themselves from legislation and ...


Is Binding Arbitration A Form Of Adr?: An Argument That The Term "Adr" Has Begun To Outlive Its Usefulness, Jean R. Sternlight Jan 2000

Is Binding Arbitration A Form Of Adr?: An Argument That The Term "Adr" Has Begun To Outlive Its Usefulness, Jean R. Sternlight

Scholarly Works

Professor Frank Sander has, for many years, been one of the most prescient commentators on the alternative dispute resolution ("ADR") movement. His 1976 Pound Conference speech has been identified by many as marking the birth of the modern ADR phenomena. That speech, which compared some of the pros and cons of litigation and an array of other dispute resolution processes, has been summarized as proposing the concept of the "multi-door courthouse." In contrast, Professor Sander's more recent and very interesting review of the present and future of ADR makes little attempt to distinguish between mediation and binding arbitration, the ...


Fighting Arbitration Clauses In Franchisor Contracts, Jean R. Sternlight Jan 2000

Fighting Arbitration Clauses In Franchisor Contracts, Jean R. Sternlight

Scholarly Works

Purporting to serve justice, efficiency, and freedom of contract, business interests are increasingly attempting to use binding arbitration clauses to secure unfair advantages over unknowing parties. Courts seemingly have been eager to enforce arbitration clauses that appear in franchise agreements. This article discusses courts’ enforcement of arbitration clauses, undermining protections to the franchisee, and how franchisees can create a more level playing field.


Should An Attorney Be Required To Advise Client Of Adr Options?, Marshall J. Breger Jan 2000

Should An Attorney Be Required To Advise Client Of Adr Options?, Marshall J. Breger

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

In recent years alternative dispute resolution (ADR) has moved from the margins of legal practice into the mainstream. It is no longer the exception for attorneys to employ or clients to request ADR services in almost every aspect of legal representation. This shift to the legal mainstream raises the question whether attorneys, as part of their general obligation to keep clients informed of their legal alternatives, should be required to advise their clients regarding ADR options. This paper will consider this question. In doing so, it will consider, at least inferentially, the character and purpose of ethics "rules."


Public Policy Defense In International Commercial Arbitration, Mingqiang Qian Jan 2000

Public Policy Defense In International Commercial Arbitration, Mingqiang Qian

LLM Theses and Essays

The purpose of this thesis is to examine how public policy defense functions in international commercial arbitration and whether it will block the development of international commercial arbitration. Chapter II deals with the role of public policy in international private law. This chapter examines the origins of public policy in common law countries and its functions in international private law. It is difficult to evaluate public policy as a precise concept because of its relative nature. Nevertheless, to limit its application in international private law, legal scholars have tried to clarify differences between domestic public policy, international public policy, and ...


Toward More Sophisticated Mediation Theory, John M. Lande Jan 2000

Toward More Sophisticated Mediation Theory, John M. Lande

Faculty Publications

In the lead article in this symposium, Professor Jeffrey Stempel provides a very thoughtful analysis of the mediation field. He focuses on the debate over facilitative and evaluative mediation and he is critical of many of the arguments made by proponents of facilitative mediation. I have expressed some similar concerns, and I generally agree with his analysis (with a quibble here and there). I do think that the facilitation-evaluation debate has been productive (though admittedly wearisome), and that proponents of facilitative mediation deserve more credit than he gives them in his article.


Transforming Cultural Conflict In An Age Of Complexity, Michelle Lebaron Jan 2000

Transforming Cultural Conflict In An Age Of Complexity, Michelle Lebaron

Faculty Publications

This article will survey several definitions of culture, arguing that the most useful approach is to define culture broadly and to recognize its significance to most or all conflicts. Some of the ways that culture affects conflicts will be outlined, accompanied by examples. These include: culture as a lens that both facilitates and blocks effective communication; culture and world view differences as the subject of conflicts; and conflicts related to identity and recognition as facets of cultural differences. Further discussed are Western models of third party intervention, inviting readers to examine the values and assumptions underlying them. Challenges inherent in ...


Using Bargaining For Advantage In Law School Negotiation Courses, Chris Guthrie Jan 2000

Using Bargaining For Advantage In Law School Negotiation Courses, Chris Guthrie

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Options, options, options ....The Negotiation literature-at least the "problem-solving" or "interestbased" or "principled" negotiation literature'repeats this mantra over and over and over. It seems self-evident that having lots of options is a good idea because more options means more to choose from. The more options there are to choose from, however, the more difficult choosing can be. Options, in short, may increase the likelihood that one will make an optimal decision, but they impose added "decision costs" on the decision maker. Law professors now face this happy dilemma when choosing materials for their Negotiation courses. Options abound-including the negotiation ...