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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

Gender And Privacy In Cyberspace, Anita L. Allen May 2000

Gender And Privacy In Cyberspace, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


2nd Annual Computer & Technology Law Institute, Office Of Continuing Legal Education At The University Of Kentucky College Of Law, Carlyle C. Ring, Holly K. Towle, Timothy E. Nielander, John G. Hundley, J. Mark Grundy, Matthew M. Clark, David E. Fleenor, William L. Montague Jr., Jack E. Toliver, Joel T. Beres, Cynthia L. Stewart, Kenneth J. Tuggle, Kenneth R. Sagan, Stephen E. Gillen Mar 2000

2nd Annual Computer & Technology Law Institute, Office Of Continuing Legal Education At The University Of Kentucky College Of Law, Carlyle C. Ring, Holly K. Towle, Timothy E. Nielander, John G. Hundley, J. Mark Grundy, Matthew M. Clark, David E. Fleenor, William L. Montague Jr., Jack E. Toliver, Joel T. Beres, Cynthia L. Stewart, Kenneth J. Tuggle, Kenneth R. Sagan, Stephen E. Gillen

Continuing Legal Education Materials

Materials from the 2nd Annual Computer & Technology Law Institute held by UK/CLE in March 2000.


Statement Of Harvey K. Morrell, University Of Baltimore Law Library, In Opposition To The Maryland Uniform Computer Information Transfer Act, Harvey K. Morrell Feb 2000

Statement Of Harvey K. Morrell, University Of Baltimore Law Library, In Opposition To The Maryland Uniform Computer Information Transfer Act, Harvey K. Morrell

All Faculty Scholarship

Testimony in opposition to the Maryland Uniform Computer Information Transfer Act, House Bill 19, Senate Bill 142, 2000.


First Amendment Freedoms And The Encryption Export Battle: Deciphering The Importance Of Bernstein V. United States Department Of Justice, 176 F.3d 1132 (9th Cir. 1999), David Mcclure Jan 2000

First Amendment Freedoms And The Encryption Export Battle: Deciphering The Importance Of Bernstein V. United States Department Of Justice, 176 F.3d 1132 (9th Cir. 1999), David Mcclure

Scholarly Works

For many years, a battle has raged over export restrictions on strong encryption products. Encryption ensures confidential and secure communications among individuals, and the Commerce Department and the State Department have long restricted its export because of national security concerns. Industry and privacy groups have fought against the restrictions for various reasons, ranging from the desire to sell encryption software in new markets to preventing government from accessing personal communications between individuals. Daniel Bernstein, a computer science graduate student, challenged these restrictions in 1996, placing himself in the center of this ongoing battle. In 1999, the Ninth Circuit Court of ...


Going Private: Technology, Due Process, And Internet Dispute Resolution, Elizabeth G. Thornburg Jan 2000

Going Private: Technology, Due Process, And Internet Dispute Resolution, Elizabeth G. Thornburg

Faculty Scholarship

Despite cliches about Internet speed, disputes that arise on and about the Internet can be time-consuming to resolve, legally murky, and factually complex. In response, Internet players with market power are opting out: mandatory arbitration is replacing both substantive law and court procedure, and technological remedies are providing self-help without any dispute resolution at all. These alternative procedures tend to move faster than courts and to cost their corporate creators less than lawsuits. They are also structured to maximize the success of the powerful. But faster is not always better. Cheap is not always fair or accurate. Market power is ...


The Establishment Of A U.S. Federal Data Protection Agency To Define And Regulate Internet Privacy And Its Impact On U.S.-China Relations: Marco Polo Where Are You?, Omar Saleem Jan 2000

The Establishment Of A U.S. Federal Data Protection Agency To Define And Regulate Internet Privacy And Its Impact On U.S.-China Relations: Marco Polo Where Are You?, Omar Saleem

Journal Publications

Marco Polo's desire to explore new worlds and exchange both ideas and goods should be the impetus behind the Internet. The Internet is the global economic network of the new millennium. This Article first discusses the factors that have caused both the reevaluation of Western notions of privacy, and consideration of the establishment of a Federal Data Protections Agency. Next, the article discusses the EU's approach to regulating Internet privacy. This section is followed by a discussion of why the U.S. and EU approaches to Internet privacy regulation must be implemented from a global, or MarcoPolo-like perspective ...


Securities Disclosure Regime - Challenges Posed By The Internet And Technology, Thomas Thomas Thoppil Jan 2000

Securities Disclosure Regime - Challenges Posed By The Internet And Technology, Thomas Thomas Thoppil

LLM Theses and Essays

This thesis is an effort to evaluate the structural changes that have taken place in the securities market of the United States and its impact on securities disclosure regime mandated by the Federal Securities Act. Part 2 of the thesis discusses the securities disclosure regime and its underlying economic theories. This part also traces the challenges posed by technology and takes a quick look at the argument that the traditional norms are incompatible in dealing with those challenges. Part 3 deals primarily with structural developments in the securities market over the past five years by examining some of the innovative ...


Privacy-As-Data Control: Conceptual, Practical, And Moral Limits Of The Paradigm, Anita L. Allen Jan 2000

Privacy-As-Data Control: Conceptual, Practical, And Moral Limits Of The Paradigm, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

32 Conn. L. Rev. 861 (2000).


Principles Of Internet Privacy, Fred H. Cate Jan 2000

Principles Of Internet Privacy, Fred H. Cate

Articles by Maurer Faculty

The definition of privacy developed by Brandeis and Warren and Prosser, and effectively codified by Alan Westin in 1967 - the claim of individuals, groups, or institutions to determine for themselves when, how, and to what extent information about them is communicated to others - worked well in a world in which most privacy concerns involved physical intrusions (usually by the government) or public disclosures (usually by the media), which, by their very nature, were comparatively rare and usually discovered.

But that definition's exclusive focus on individual control has grown incomplete in a world in which most privacy concerns involve data ...