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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Law

Integrating The Complexity Of Mental Disability Into The Criminal Law Course, Linda C. Fentiman May 2007

Integrating The Complexity Of Mental Disability Into The Criminal Law Course, Linda C. Fentiman

Pace Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Taking Victims Seriously: A Dworkinian Theory Of Punishment, Luis E. Chiesa Jan 2007

Taking Victims Seriously: A Dworkinian Theory Of Punishment, Luis E. Chiesa

Pace Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Normative Gaps In The Criminal Law: A Reasons Theory Of Wrongdoing, Luis E. Chiesa Jan 2007

Normative Gaps In The Criminal Law: A Reasons Theory Of Wrongdoing, Luis E. Chiesa

Pace Law Faculty Publications

In this article it is argued that in two controversial homicide cases--severing conjoined twins and downing a hijacked commercial plane headed toward a heavily populated area--it is permissible to kill innocent human beings without having to establish the existence of a claim of justifcation such as self-defense or choice of evils. Even though criminal law scholars consider that unjustified conduct is always wrong, the position defended in the article is that there is a normative gap between an absence of justification and a finding of wrongdoing. This "normative gap defense," which negates wrongdoing without justifying the conduct, is the best ...


Litigating Brady V. Maryland: Games Prosecutors Play, Bennett L. Gershman Jan 2007

Litigating Brady V. Maryland: Games Prosecutors Play, Bennett L. Gershman

Pace Law Faculty Publications

By any measure, Brady v. Maryland has not lived up to its expectations. Brady's announcement of a constitutional duty on prosecutors to disclose exculpatory evidence to defendants embodies, more powerfully than any other constitutional rule, the core of the prosecutor's ethical duty to seek justice rather than victory. Nevertheless, prosecutors over the years have not accorded Brady the respect it deserves. Prosecutors have violated its principles so often that it stands more as a landmark to prosecutorial indifference and abuse than a hallmark of justice. Moreover, as interpreted by the judiciary, Brady actually invites prosecutors to bend, if ...


Justice Without Politics: Prosecutorial Discretion And The International Criminal Court, Alexander K.A. Greenawalt Jan 2007

Justice Without Politics: Prosecutorial Discretion And The International Criminal Court, Alexander K.A. Greenawalt

Pace Law Faculty Publications

The ICC Prosecutor's own charging policies should be prepared to give way to the judgments of legitimate political actors in times of political transition when actual arrests are more likely and competing justice proposals pose a more troubling challenge to the ICC's authority. In that scenario, I argue that the Prosecutor should encourage legitimate political actors to reach policy decisions that will command deference by the ICC. Such deference could take one or both of the following forms: (1) explicit deference to political actors, principally the U.N. Security Council acting under Chapter VII of the U.N ...


The Act Requirement As A Basic Concept Of Criminal Law, Luis E. Chiesa Jan 2007

The Act Requirement As A Basic Concept Of Criminal Law, Luis E. Chiesa

Pace Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Is Silence Sacred? The Vulnerability Of Griffin V. California In A Terrorist World, Lissa Griffin Jan 2007

Is Silence Sacred? The Vulnerability Of Griffin V. California In A Terrorist World, Lissa Griffin

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Part I of this Article traces the shared history of the right against self-incrimination from twelfth-century England to the mid-twentieth century. Part II examines the modern history of the privilege in the United States, from the Supreme Court's 1965 decision in Griffin to its 1999 decision in Mitchell. Part III examines the United Kingdom's modern approach to the privilege, including its re-shaping of the privilege in response to domestic terrorism. Part IV examines why the U.S. and U.K. systems, with a common history and shared values, have moved in such dramatically different directions with respect to ...