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Head Of State Criminal Responsibility For Environmental War Crimes: Case Study: The Arabian Gulf Armed Conflict 1990-1991, Meshari K. Eifan Sep 2007

Head Of State Criminal Responsibility For Environmental War Crimes: Case Study: The Arabian Gulf Armed Conflict 1990-1991, Meshari K. Eifan

Dissertations & Theses

This paper aims to provide a comparative study of the existing international criminal law framework and its relation to environmental protection during armed conflict. To approach this objective, the study will review the environmental crisis that occurred during the armed conflict in the Arabian Gulf in 1990-1991 as a case study for determining whether the international community adequately responds to these events.

Thus, this study is divided into five main parts. Part I assesses the justifications for a remedy, the criminal remedy, that is more adequate than the United Nations remedy taken toward Saddam Hussein’s actions against the environment ...


The International Human Rights Committee: The Global Influence Of The City Bar, Mark R. Shulman May 2007

The International Human Rights Committee: The Global Influence Of The City Bar, Mark R. Shulman

Pace Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Democracy, Gender, And Governance: Introduction, Darren Rosenblum Jan 2007

Democracy, Gender, And Governance: Introduction, Darren Rosenblum

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Since at least the mid 1990s and the Fourth World Conference for Women in Beijing, gender as an analytic category and as a programmatic concern has become a mainstream part of international law. While feminists have traditionally understood their relation to international law in critical terms and from their position as outsiders, this turn toward gender equality places at least some feminists and some of their projects within the governance structure of international law itself. This crucial shift from exclusion to partial inclusion merits examination.