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Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration

Duke Law

Risk management

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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Social Value Of Mortality Risk Reduction: Vsl Vs. The Social Welfare Function Approach, Matthew D. Adler, James K. Hammitt, Nicolas Treich Jan 2014

The Social Value Of Mortality Risk Reduction: Vsl Vs. The Social Welfare Function Approach, Matthew D. Adler, James K. Hammitt, Nicolas Treich

Faculty Scholarship

We examine how different welfarist frameworks evaluate the social value of mortality risk reduction. These frameworks include classical, distributively unweighted cost–benefit analysis—i.e., the “value per statistical life” (VSL) approach—and various social welfare functions (SWFs). The SWFs are either utilitarian or prioritarian, applied to policy choice under risk in either an “ex post” or “ex ante” manner. We examine the conditions on individual utility and on the SWF under which these frameworks display sensitivity to wealth and to baseline risk. Moreover, we discuss whether these frameworks satisfy related properties that have received some attention in the literature ...


Better Ways To Study Regulatory Elephants, Jonathan B. Wiener, Brendon Swedlow, James K. Hammitt, Michael D. Rogers, Peter H. Sand Jan 2013

Better Ways To Study Regulatory Elephants, Jonathan B. Wiener, Brendon Swedlow, James K. Hammitt, Michael D. Rogers, Peter H. Sand

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Risk, Death And Harm: The Normative Foundations Of Risk Regulation, Matthew D. Adler Jan 2003

Risk, Death And Harm: The Normative Foundations Of Risk Regulation, Matthew D. Adler

Faculty Scholarship

Is death a harm? Is the risk of death a harm? These questions lie at the foundations of risk regulation. Agencies that regulate threats to human life, such as the EPA, OSHA, the FDA, the CPSC, or NHTSA, invariably assume that premature death is a first-party harm - a welfare setback to the person who dies - and often assume that being at risk of death is a distinct and additional first-party harm. If these assumptions are untrue, the myriad statutes and regulations that govern risky activities should be radically overhauled, since the third-party benefits of preventing premature death and the risk ...