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Series

Law and Gender

2010

Washington and Lee University School of Law

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

Gender, Discourse, And Customary Law In Africa, Johanna E. Bond Jan 2010

Gender, Discourse, And Customary Law In Africa, Johanna E. Bond

Scholarly Articles

Around the world, efforts by states to accommodate cultural pluralism vary in form and vigor. Some multiculturalist states cede to cultural minorities the authority to govern in certain substantive areas, such as family law. Not surprisingly, feminists have raised concerns that a state’s reluctance to govern in areas traditionally seen as “private,” and leaving those areas of law to customary legal systems, leaves women within those minority communities vulnerable to discrimination. Many women value cultural identity, even as they work to eliminate discrimination within their cultural communities. The international human rights community, however, has not always viewed women as ...


Clinton, Ginsburg, And Centrist Federalism, Russell A. Miller Jan 2010

Clinton, Ginsburg, And Centrist Federalism, Russell A. Miller

Scholarly Articles

Politics' and pathology have converged to heighten speculation that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's tenure on the Supreme Court is nearing its end. Even if the imminence of her retirement is greatly exaggerated, the time to reflect on Justice Ginsburg's lasting contribution to American constitutional law has arrived. Justice Ginsburg is best known for her long campaign to promote gender equality. Her successful advocacy on that issue before the Supreme Court throughout the 1970s led President Clinton to conclude, when announcing her nomination to fill Justice Byron White's vacated seat on the high court, that she is to ...