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Full-Text Articles in Law

Analyzing The Virginia Workers' Compensation Act's Governance Of Employer Non-Compliance, D. Paul Holdsworth Nov 2016

Analyzing The Virginia Workers' Compensation Act's Governance Of Employer Non-Compliance, D. Paul Holdsworth

Law Student Publications

This essay attempts to resolve the current disconnect in the state judiciary‘s application of section 65.2-805(A) by analyzing the language of the statute as well as the various policy implications that undergird its establishment and accompany each interpretation. Part I provides a brief background of workers‘ compensation law generally, the Virginia Workers‘ Compensation Act (including section 65.2-805(A)), and the relevant case law involving section 65.2-805(A). Part II proceeds with the essay‘s argument, i.e., that section 65.2-805(A) should not be interpreted as imposing strict liability on non-compliant employers and thereby ...


Waging The War Against Unpaid Labor: A Call To Revoke Fact Sheet #71 In Light Of Recent Unpaid Internship Litigation, Rachel P. Willer May 2016

Waging The War Against Unpaid Labor: A Call To Revoke Fact Sheet #71 In Light Of Recent Unpaid Internship Litigation, Rachel P. Willer

Law Student Publications

Part I of this comment provides an overview of prevailing agency and judicial interpretations of unpaid internships. Part II describes recent internship litigation and the trend towards courts abandoning the Wage and Hour Division's six-factor test in favor of a more expansive primary beneficiary test. Part III suggests that Fact Sheet #71 is an outdated model that is inapplicable to contemporary internships. The Wage and Hour Division's six-factor test lacks the "force of law" and should not warrant undue judicial deference. Alternatively, the primary beneficiary test, articulated in the Second Circuit's holding in Glatt v. Fox Searchlight ...


Union Representation In Employment Arbitration, Ann C. Hodges Jan 2016

Union Representation In Employment Arbitration, Ann C. Hodges

Law Faculty Publications

Employers in recent years have promulgated arbitration programs to resolve disputes with their present and former employees. Arbitration may in many cases provide a lower-cost forum than litigation for resolving such disputes. But the problem of representation of Americans of modest incomes still remains. Ann Hodges explores in this chapter whether labor unions can help address that representation gap.


Rejecting The Tattooed Applicant, Disciplining The Tattooed Employee: What Are The Risks?, Stephen Allred Jan 2016

Rejecting The Tattooed Applicant, Disciplining The Tattooed Employee: What Are The Risks?, Stephen Allred

Law Faculty Publications

In the last twenty years, there has been a significant rise in the popularity of tattoos. Once relegated to the marginal realm of sailors, motorcycle gang members, or dock workers, tattoos are now proudly displayed by NBA stars, rock artists, and film actors. Perhaps not surprisingly, American workers, particularly younger workers, have emulated their idols and obtained tattoos too—at a remarkable rate. In fact, a 2012 Harris Poll found that one in five American adults had at least one tattoo. And while increasing percentages of Americans view tattoos as acceptable (indeed, even as art), tattoos still carry a persistent ...


Derivative Racial Discrimination, Kevin Woodson Jan 2016

Derivative Racial Discrimination, Kevin Woodson

Law Faculty Publications

This Article introduces the concept of derivative racial discrimination, a process of institutional discrimination in which certain social and cultural dynamics impede the careers of minority workers in predominantly white firms even in the absence of racial biases and stereotypes. Derivative racial discrimination is a manifestation of cultural homophily, the universal tendency of people to gravitate toward others with similar cultural interests and backgrounds. Although not intrinsically racial, cultural homophily disadvantages minority workers in predominantly white work settings due to various race-related social and cultural differences. Seemingly inconsequential in isolation, these differences produce racial disparities in the accrual of valuable ...


Constitutional Economics, Luke P. Norris Jan 2016

Constitutional Economics, Luke P. Norris

Law Faculty Publications

This Article argues that the conventional narrative about the decline of Lochnerism and the rise of mid-century substantive due process jurisprudence is incomplete. That narrative focuses initially on how the premises underlying Lochner’s conception of economic freedom were rejected. The Article instead focuses on how the labor movement articulated an alternative conception of freedom that was adopted by Congress, the Executive, and the Supreme Court. While Lochnerism was premised on a negative view of freedom, the labor movement articulated a positive view of freedom and analogized it to republican freedom of association in the political sphere. By reframing the ...


Imagining U.S. Labor Relations Without Union Security, Ann C. Hodges Jan 2016

Imagining U.S. Labor Relations Without Union Security, Ann C. Hodges

Law Faculty Publications

Attacks on union finances are intensifying. These assaults, which come in various forms, have the potential to jeopardize the current systems of labor relations in the United States in both private and public sectors. This essay analyzes what might happen if the challenges are successful. Unions may shrink further in size or power, or alternatively, respond to new conditions in ways that strengthen them. Removal of union security might prompt legal change such as elimination of the duty of fair representation, elimination of the system of exclusive representation, or permitting the union to charge nonmembers for actual representation. These changes ...


Public Sector Employment: Cases And Materials, Ann C. Hodges Jan 2016

Public Sector Employment: Cases And Materials, Ann C. Hodges

Law Faculty Publications

Shortly after publication of the second edition of this casebook, dramatic changes occurred in public sector labor law, most visibly in Wisconsin where large public demonstrations captured the attention of the nation while protesting the virtual elimination of collective bargaining rights for most public employees in Wisconsin, home of the first public sector bargaining law enacted in 1959. A number of other states changed their laws, most reducing bargaining rights, although some of the changes were later revoked by public referendum. This retrenchment of bargaining rights, which was not uniform, was attributed to state financial difficulties following the recession that ...