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Full-Text Articles in Law

Putting A Price On Whales To Save Them: What Do Morals Have To Do With It?, Hope M. Babcock Jan 2013

Putting A Price On Whales To Save Them: What Do Morals Have To Do With It?, Hope M. Babcock

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The author explores the moral implication of a proposal to create an international market in whale shares as an alternative to the dysfunctional International Whaling Commission. She finds the proposal amoral because whales, like humans, have an intrinsic right to life. Since this leaves whales vulnerable to whale hunting nations, she suggests that international environmental organizations might help a whale preservation norm emerge in whaling nations by using education and interventionist activities that focus on whaling’s cruelty to ultimately encourage the citizens and governments of those nations to change their self-image as whale eating cultures.


Why Changing Norms Is A More Just Solution To The Failed International Regulatory Regime To Protect Whales Than A Trading Program In Whale Shares, Hope M. Babcock Jan 2013

Why Changing Norms Is A More Just Solution To The Failed International Regulatory Regime To Protect Whales Than A Trading Program In Whale Shares, Hope M. Babcock

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Whales capture the public's imagination like no other wild animal. They have played a central role in "the social construction of modern ecological thought." Indeed, the survival of whales has been a symbol of the environmental movement since the latter quarter of the twentieth century, when the "slogan 'save the whales' was a call to arms to save the planet from humanity's folly. " Stories about whale conservation implicate cultural clashes, interspecies morality, and global politics. They offer lessons in how not to manage a natural resource, and simultaneously show how both governmental and individual activism can overcome this ...


The Rebirth Of The Neighborhood, J. Peter Byrne Jan 2013

The Rebirth Of The Neighborhood, J. Peter Byrne

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This essay argues that new urban residents primarily seek a type of community properly called a neighborhood. “Neighborhood” refers to a legible, pedestrian-scale area that has an identity apart from the corporate and bureaucratic structures that dominate the larger society. Such a neighborhood fosters repeated, casual contacts with neighbors and merchants, such as while one pursues Saturday errands or takes children to activities. Dealing with independent local merchants and artisans face-to-face provides a sense of liberation from large power structures, where most such residents work. Having easy access to places of sociability like coffee shops and bars permits spontaneous “meet-ups ...


The Sad Story Of The Northern Rocky Mountain Gray Wolf Reintroduction Program, Hope M. Babcock Jan 2013

The Sad Story Of The Northern Rocky Mountain Gray Wolf Reintroduction Program, Hope M. Babcock

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

A reflection on the past, present and future of environmental law in this 20th Anniversary Edition offers an opportunity to revisit the Endangered Species Act, particularly the Northern Rocky Mountain States federal wolf reintroduction program. Environmental programs that depend on public support for their effectiveness are problematic when the government fails to understand and compensate for this fact. This essay explores the proposition that the federal government's failure to anticipate and respond to the negative reaction of people adversely affected by proposed solutions to environmental problems is contributing to a lack of progress despite great strides in our scientific ...