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Full-Text Articles in Law

Modernizing Water Law: The Example Of Florida, Christine A. Klein, Mary Jane Angelo, Richard Hamann Jul 2009

Modernizing Water Law: The Example Of Florida, Christine A. Klein, Mary Jane Angelo, Richard Hamann

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article takes a national view of the modernization of water law. Using Florida as an example, it identifies some of the most important and controversial challenges faced by states. Part II provides an overview of the process of water law reform. As states attempt to improve water management, they have modified their common law water allocation systems with an overlay of statutory law. Often, the process occurs in a piecemeal fashion, resulting in a patchwork of rules -- common law and statutory, old and new. In rare cases -- including that of Florida -- the process may be more comprehensive, one through ...


Wal-Mart In The Garden District: Does The Arbitrary And Capricious Standard Of Review In Nepa Cases Undermine Citizen Participation?, Dawn E. Jourdan, Kevin Gifford Jan 2009

Wal-Mart In The Garden District: Does The Arbitrary And Capricious Standard Of Review In Nepa Cases Undermine Citizen Participation?, Dawn E. Jourdan, Kevin Gifford

UF Law Faculty Publications

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), enacted in 1969, requires that agencies of the U.S. government or those seeking to use federal funds to construct projects study the environmental and social impacts of said projects. Under the provisions of NEPA, a first-level review must be conducted for all projects not otherwise exempted. If the entity conducting the review deems that the project will result in a significant impact on humans or the environment, an environmental impact statement (EIS) must be prepared. The decision about whether or not to prepare an EIS can be controversial due to the fact that ...


The Environmental Deficit: Applying Lessons From The Economic Recession, Christine A. Klein Jan 2009

The Environmental Deficit: Applying Lessons From The Economic Recession, Christine A. Klein

UF Law Faculty Publications

In 2007, the nation entered its greatest financial downturn since the Great Depression of the 1930s. What followed was a period of national introspection. Although prescriptions for financial rescue varied widely in the details, a surprisingly broad consensus emerged as to the underlying pathology of the crisis. This Article explores three principal contributing factors and the lessons associated with each that make up this pathology. These factors include: rejecting rules through deregulation, trivializing risk through overly optimistic analyses, and overconsumption supported by reckless borrowing and lending practices.

The powerful lessons from this pathology, considered by a stunned nation in the ...


Stumbling Toward Success: A Story Of Adaptive Law And Ecological Resilience, Mary Jane Angelo Jan 2009

Stumbling Toward Success: A Story Of Adaptive Law And Ecological Resilience, Mary Jane Angelo

UF Law Faculty Publications

For decades, scientific and legal scholars alike have promoted the concept of "adaptive management" as a necessary approach to meaningful environmental management, restoration, and regulation. Unfortunately, adaptive management success stories are few and far between. The Lake Apopka Restoration Project provides a real-world illustration of adaptive management at work. This article uses adaptive management theory to explore mechanisms to make environmental law better able to address the uncertainties and changing nature of natural systems to restore and protect ecological resilience.


Enhanced Water Quality Protection In Florida: An Analysis Of The Regulatory And Practical Significance Of An Outstanding Florida Water Designation, Thomas T. Ankersen, Richard Hamann, Rachel King, Megan Wegerif, John November Jan 2009

Enhanced Water Quality Protection In Florida: An Analysis Of The Regulatory And Practical Significance Of An Outstanding Florida Water Designation, Thomas T. Ankersen, Richard Hamann, Rachel King, Megan Wegerif, John November

UF Law Faculty Publications

The Outstanding Florida Water (OFW) designation is the highest protection offered to a body of water by the state of Florida and is available only to those waters whose “natural attributes” warrant it. An OFW designation provides that water body with an antidegradation standard for certain activities affecting its water quality. Ordinarily, waters in Florida must meet the criteria established by rule for their respective class of water (based on the Florida water body classification system), regardless of existing water quality. Once a water body is designated as an OFW, however, a baseline water quality standard is set based on ...


Protecting A Natural Resource Legacy While Promoting Reslience: Can It Be Done?, Alyson C. Flournoy Jan 2009

Protecting A Natural Resource Legacy While Promoting Reslience: Can It Be Done?, Alyson C. Flournoy

UF Law Faculty Publications

Our stock of natural resources, and the values and services they provide, are diminishing steadily over time. We have dozens of laws, enacted over a period of almost forty years that express the objective of stemming this tide. Yet, the inexorable, incremental loss continues. Scholars concerned with conservation of our natural capital have long wrestled with how best to improve the laws we have in place and to supplement the framework of existing law with newer approaches. One common theme in efforts to design progressive conservation law is how to better incorporate scientific insights into our legal regimes.

This effort ...