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Criminal Procedure

2012

Institution
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Articles 1 - 30 of 114

Full-Text Articles in Law

Summary Of Howard V. State, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 67, Priscilla Baker Dec 2012

Summary Of Howard V. State, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 67, Priscilla Baker

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court considered the State’s motion to reconsider and other various motions regarding the sealing of the ex parte motion to substitute counsel. It further deliberated whether documents and records could be filed under seal in a pending criminal case before the Court. In addition, the Court also addressed the requirements and procedures for sealing such documents and records.


Summary Of State V. Tricas, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 62, Katelyn Franklin Dec 2012

Summary Of State V. Tricas, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 62, Katelyn Franklin

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court considered the State’s appeal from a district court order granting the defendant’s motion to withdraw her guilty plea and to dismiss the criminal case under Nevada’s prosecutorial immunity statutes, NRS 178.572 and NRS 178.574.


Summary Of Jackson V. State, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 55, Sarah Mead Dec 2012

Summary Of Jackson V. State, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 55, Sarah Mead

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

Appeals from district court judgments of conviction based on similar questions regarding double jeopardy and redundancy. The Court considered whether a criminal defendant who is charged with both attempted murder and battery or aggravated battery through a single act can be so charged, or whether such a charge constitutes double jeopardy, or violates Nevada’s common law redundancy theory.


The Incredible Shrinking Confrontation Clause, Jeffrey Bellin Dec 2012

The Incredible Shrinking Confrontation Clause, Jeffrey Bellin

Faculty Publications

Sharp turns in the Supreme Court’s recent Confrontation Clause jurisprudence have left scholars reeling from conflicting emotions: exhilaration, despair, denial, and soon, perhaps, cynical acceptance. While most commentators celebrated the demise of the incoherent Ohio v. Roberts framework, their excitement largely faded as the Court’s decisions in Davis v. Washington and Bryant v. Michigan revealed nascent flaws in the evolving doctrine and sharply curtailed the newly revitalized confrontation right.

Recent scholarship strives to reanimate the jurisprudence by expanding the doctrinal definition of “testimonial” statements – the sole form of evidence that the Court now recognizes as implicating the Confrontation ...


Plea Bargaining And The Right To The Effective Assistance Of Counsel: Where The Rubber Hits The Road In Capital Cases, John H. Blume Dec 2012

Plea Bargaining And The Right To The Effective Assistance Of Counsel: Where The Rubber Hits The Road In Capital Cases, John H. Blume

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Perfecting Criminal Markets, David Jaros Dec 2012

Perfecting Criminal Markets, David Jaros

All Faculty Scholarship

From illicit drugs to human smuggling to prostitution, legislators may actually be perfecting the very criminal markets they seek to destroy. Criminal laws often create new dangers and new criminal opportunities. Criminalizing drugs creates the opportunity to sell fake drugs. Raising the penalties for illegal immigration increases the risk that smugglers will rely on dangerous methods that can injure or kill their human cargo. Banning prostitution increases the underground spread of sexually transmitted disease. Lawmakers traditionally respond to these “second order” problems in predictable fashion — with a new wave of criminalization that imposes additional penalties on fake drug dealers, dangerous ...


The Legal Significance Of The Psychological Ability To Appreciate The “Other”, Paul F. Rothstein Nov 2012

The Legal Significance Of The Psychological Ability To Appreciate The “Other”, Paul F. Rothstein

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Recently the U.S. Supreme Court, citing neurological and psychological studies, held that because juveniles are deficient in appreciating consequences to others, they should never be given the death penalty. The author found, in his years as a legal scholar, educator, and practitioner, that “appreciating the ‘other’”--putting oneself in the position of others---is critical to law and the study of law in more than the obvious ways.

The author became aware of empirical studies and psychological experiments demonstrating that children below a certain age have trouble seeing things from another’s vantage point, and found that the facility to ...


Incompetent Plea Bargaining And Extrajudicial Reforms, Stephanos Bibas Nov 2012

Incompetent Plea Bargaining And Extrajudicial Reforms, Stephanos Bibas

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Last year, in Lafler v. Cooper and Missouri v. Frye, a five-to-four majority of the Supreme Court held that incompetent lawyering that causes a defendant to reject a plea offer can constitute deficient performance, and the resulting loss of a favorable plea bargain can constitute cognizable prejudice, under the Sixth Amendment. This commentary, published as part of the Harvard Law Review’s Supreme Court issue, analyzes both decisions. The majority and dissenting opinions almost talked past each other, reaching starkly different conclusions because they started from opposing premises: contemporary and pragmatic versus historical and formalist. Belatedly, the Court noticed that ...


Summary Of Goudge V. State, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 52, Joseph Sakai Oct 2012

Summary Of Goudge V. State, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 52, Joseph Sakai

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

An appeal addressing a district court’s discretion when deciding a petition for release from a special sentence of lifetime supervision under NRS 176.0931(3) and whether the district court has the discretion to deny the release if the requirements in the statute have been met.


Summary Of Sherriff V. Andrews, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 51, Robert Stewart Oct 2012

Summary Of Sherriff V. Andrews, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 51, Robert Stewart

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

In an appeal from a district court order granting a pretrial petition for a writ of habeas corpus and dismissing a charge for possession of an item commonly used to escape, the Court determined whether NRS 212.093(1) encompasses a prohibition on cell phones.


Summary Of State V. Javier C., 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 50, Sarah Stephan Oct 2012

Summary Of State V. Javier C., 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 50, Sarah Stephan

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

An appeal from a district court order dismissing a category B felony charge of battery under NRS 200.481(2)(f), finding the statute’s definition of “prisoner” was not meant to include juvenile defendants committed to a detention center for delinquency.


Assessing The Cost Effectiveness Of Policy Options To Address Overcrowding At The Broome County Public Safety Facility, Daniel J. Reynolds Oct 2012

Assessing The Cost Effectiveness Of Policy Options To Address Overcrowding At The Broome County Public Safety Facility, Daniel J. Reynolds

MPA Capstone Projects 2006 - 2015

In 1996, Broome County opened the new Broome County Public Safety Facility (BCPSF) that doubles the County's capacity for housing inmates locally. However, the County has experienced a significant increase in jail population since BCPSF was opened. This has resulted in the resumption of the practice of boarding excess inmates at regional facilities. Given the County's desire to contain costs associated with overcrowding, this research project conducted a cost effectiveness analysis of three policy alternatives to address the jail overcrowding issues: (1) maintaining the current practice of boarding, (2) renovating a gymnasium into a 48 bed "Gym-Pod," or ...


Applying Crawford's Confrontation Right In A Digital Age, Jeffrey Bellin Oct 2012

Applying Crawford's Confrontation Right In A Digital Age, Jeffrey Bellin

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Drug Sentencing Policy Discourse Of Fortaleza, Nick Sundback Oct 2012

Drug Sentencing Policy Discourse Of Fortaleza, Nick Sundback

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Drug sentencing is a pressing issue in Brazil. With the context of high and increasing rates of crime and drug use, overcrowded prisons, and high rates of recidivism both in terms of prison and drug addiction, attitudes of individuals towards drug sentencing policy are worthy of observation and examination.

The objective of this monograph is to examine discourse by informants, five individuals who interact with sections of society most affected by drug sentencing, namely drug users. This monograph will consider pluralistic observations on, and evaluations of, drug sentencing practices, implementation of drug sentencing, an overview of the broader debate over ...


Separate But Equal: Miranda's Rights To Silence And Counsel, Steven P. Grossman Oct 2012

Separate But Equal: Miranda's Rights To Silence And Counsel, Steven P. Grossman

All Faculty Scholarship

Three decades ago, the Supreme Court created a dubious distinction between the rights accorded to suspects in custody who invoke their right to silence and who invoke their right to counsel. This distinction significantly disadvantages those who do not have the good sense or good fortune to specify they want an attorney when they invoke their right to remain silent. This article argues that this distinction was flawed at its genesis and that it has led to judicial decisions that are inconsistent, make little sense, and permit police behavior that substantially diminishes the right to silence as described in Miranda ...


Estimating Gender Disparities In Federal Criminal Cases, Sonja Starr Aug 2012

Estimating Gender Disparities In Federal Criminal Cases, Sonja Starr

Law & Economics Working Papers

This paper assesses gender disparities in federal criminal cases. It finds large gender gaps favoring women throughout the sentence length distribution (averaging over 60%), conditional on arrest offense, criminal history, and other pre-charge observables. Female arrestees are also significantly likelier to avoid charges and convictions entirely, and twice as likely to avoid incarceration if convicted. Prior studies have reported much smaller sentence gaps because they have ignored the role of charging, plea-bargaining, and sentencing fact-finding in producing sentences. Most studies control for endogenous severity measures that result from these earlier discretionary processes and use samples that have been winnowed by ...


Summary Of In Re George J., 128 Nev. Advanced Opinion No. 32, Emily Navasca Jul 2012

Summary Of In Re George J., 128 Nev. Advanced Opinion No. 32, Emily Navasca

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court considered an appeal from a district court’s order transferring a juvenile case to justice court for adult criminal proceedings pursuant to NRS 62B.335.


Summary Of Nevada V. Barren, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 31, Amanda Ireland Jul 2012

Summary Of Nevada V. Barren, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 31, Amanda Ireland

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

An appeal from a district court order granting writ of mandamus directing the justice court to dismiss a criminal complaint for lack of jurisdiction.


Prosecutorial Decriminalization, Erik Luna Jul 2012

Prosecutorial Decriminalization, Erik Luna

Faculty Scholarship

The article discusses the legal concept of prosecutorial decriminalization in the U.S. as of July 2012, focusing on an analysis of the use of criminal laws to enforce the public standards of morality in America. Penal codes and criminal sanctions are addressed, along with several reform measures aimed at restructuring a criminal law system in the U.S. which has reportedly been overburdened by overcriminalization. The use of the American judiciary system as a check on overcriminalization is mentioned.


Taming Negotiated Justice, Stephanos Bibas Jun 2012

Taming Negotiated Justice, Stephanos Bibas

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

After four decades of neglecting laissez-faire plea bargaining, the Supreme Court got it right. In Missouri v. Frye and Lafler v. Cooper, the Court recognized that the Sixth Amendment regulates plea bargaining. Thus, the Court held that criminal defendants can challenge deficient advice that causes them to reject favorable plea bargains and receive heavier sentences after trial. Finally, the Court has brought law to the shadowy plea-bargaining bazaar.

Writing in dissent, Justice Scalia argued that the majority’s opinion “opens a whole new boutique of constitutional jurisprudence (‘plea-bargaining law’).” To which I say: it is about time the Court developed ...


Editor's Observations: It's Alive! The Federal Booker-Fix Debate Sirs, Frank O. Bowman Iii Jun 2012

Editor's Observations: It's Alive! The Federal Booker-Fix Debate Sirs, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

Seven years have passed since Justice Ginsburg do-si-doed from the merits majority to the remedial majority in Booker and transformed the Federal Sentencing Guidelines into an advisory system.' And despite the logical absurdity of the Scalian Sixth Amendment doctrine that produced this outcome,' and despite the expectation of folks like me that this marriage of fish and fowl could not long survive, it survives. What is more, a great many people whose opinion matters now claim to love it-or at least to like it well enough to want to keep it for the foreseeable future. Thus, the outburst of legislative ...


When The Cheering (For Gideon ) Stops: The Defense Bar And Representation At Initial Bail Hearings, Douglas L. Colbert Jun 2012

When The Cheering (For Gideon ) Stops: The Defense Bar And Representation At Initial Bail Hearings, Douglas L. Colbert

Faculty Scholarship

This article suggests that the absence of representation at the beginning of a State criminal prosecution must come to a screeching halt. The criminal defense bar should take a leadership role and dedicate Gideon's anniversary to making certain that an accused's right to the effective assistance of counsel begins at the initial bail hearing. Indeed, guaranteeing vigorous representation should be the defense bar's number one priority.


Summary Of Whitehead V. State, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 24, Eric Carson May 2012

Summary Of Whitehead V. State, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 24, Eric Carson

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court grants an en banc reconsideration of an appeal from an order dismissing a post-conviction petition for writ of habeas corpus.


Summary Of State V. Huebler, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 19, Richard A. Andrews Apr 2012

Summary Of State V. Huebler, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 19, Richard A. Andrews

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court considered an appeal from the district court’s grant of relief of an untimely petition for a writ of habeas corpus from a conviction based on a guilty plea.


Summary Of Rodriguez V. Nevada, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 14, Rami Hernandez Apr 2012

Summary Of Rodriguez V. Nevada, 128 Nev. Adv. Op. 14, Rami Hernandez

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

An appeal from a district court criminal conviction, pursuant to a jury verdict, on evidentiary grounds.


Panel On Prosecutorial Immunity: Deconstructing Connick V. Thompson, Dane Ciolino, Gary Clements, Bennett L. Gershman, Adam M. Gershowitz, Kathleen Ridolfi, Samuel R. Wiseman, Stephen Singer Apr 2012

Panel On Prosecutorial Immunity: Deconstructing Connick V. Thompson, Dane Ciolino, Gary Clements, Bennett L. Gershman, Adam M. Gershowitz, Kathleen Ridolfi, Samuel R. Wiseman, Stephen Singer

Faculty Publications

In November 2011, the Journal hosted a symposium on prosecutorial immunity at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law. The symposium included an in-depth analysis of Connick v. Thompson. As part of the symposium, the Journal organized a Panel, the transcript of which follows. This transcript consists of the speakers' remarks along with audience participation and questions. The Journal has attempted to preserve the character and substance of the discussion. While this is not a traditional article, the Journal felt that it would be fitting to include it in its spring volume.


Brady, Trust, And Error, Samuel R. Wiseman Apr 2012

Brady, Trust, And Error, Samuel R. Wiseman

Scholarly Publications

No abstract provided.


Is Emerging Adulthood Influencing Moffitt’S Developmental Taxonomy? Adding The “Prolonged” Adolescent Offender, Christopher Salvatore, Travis A. Taniguchi, Wayne Welsh Apr 2012

Is Emerging Adulthood Influencing Moffitt’S Developmental Taxonomy? Adding The “Prolonged” Adolescent Offender, Christopher Salvatore, Travis A. Taniguchi, Wayne Welsh

Department of Justice Studies Faculty Scholarship and Creative Works

The study of offender trajectories has been a prolific area of criminological research. However, few studies have incorporated the influence of emerging adulthood, a recently identified stage of the life course, on offending trajectories. The present study addressed this shortcoming by introducing the "prolonged adolescent" offender, a low-level offender between the ages of 18 and 25 that has failed to successfully transition into adult social roles. A theoretical background based on prior research in life-course criminology and emerging adulthood is presented. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health analyses examined the relationship between indicators of traditional turning ...


The Model Penal Code’S Wrong Turn: Renunciation As A Defense To Criminal Conspiracy, R. Michael Cassidy, Gregory Massing Apr 2012

The Model Penal Code’S Wrong Turn: Renunciation As A Defense To Criminal Conspiracy, R. Michael Cassidy, Gregory Massing

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

While the Model Penal Code was certainly one the most influential developments in criminal law in the past century, the American Law Institute (ALI) took a seriously wrong turn by recognizing a defense of “renunciation” to the crime of conspiracy. Under the Model Penal Code formulation, a member of a conspiracy who later disavows the agreement and thwarts its objective (for example, by notifying authorities of the planned crime in order to prevent its completion) is afforded a complete defense to conspiracy liability. This defense has enormous implications for crimes involving national security and terrorism, which are typically planned covertly ...


Madness Alone Punishes The Madman: The Search For Moral Dignity In The Court's Competency Doctrine As Applied In Capital Cases, J. Amy Dillard Apr 2012

Madness Alone Punishes The Madman: The Search For Moral Dignity In The Court's Competency Doctrine As Applied In Capital Cases, J. Amy Dillard

All Faculty Scholarship

The purposes of the competency doctrine are to guarantee reliability in criminal prosecutions, to ensure that only those defendants who can appreciate punishment are subject to it, and to maintain moral dignity, both actual and apparent, in criminal proceedings. No matter his crime, the “madman” should not be forced to stand trial. Historically, courts viewed questions of competency as a binary choice, finding the defendant either competent or incompetent to stand trial. However, in Edwards v. Indiana, the Supreme Court conceded that it views competency on a spectrum and offered a new category of competency — borderline-competent. The Court held that ...