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Series

Criminal Procedure

1997

Institution
Keyword
Publication

Articles 1 - 30 of 36

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Age Of Unreason: The Impact Of Reasonableness, Increased Police Force, And Colorblindness On Terry "Stop And Frisk", Omar Saleem Dec 1997

The Age Of Unreason: The Impact Of Reasonableness, Increased Police Force, And Colorblindness On Terry "Stop And Frisk", Omar Saleem

Journal Publications

No abstract provided.


Jury Reform: Of Myths And Moral Panics, Peter Duff, Mark Findlay Dec 1997

Jury Reform: Of Myths And Moral Panics, Peter Duff, Mark Findlay

Research Collection School Of Law

It is now commonplace to assert that the jury performs an important ideological or symbolic role in the criminal justice process. Indeed, it is often argued that this function is more significant than the impact the jury has in practice (see Mungham & Bankowski 1976; Duff & Findlay 1982; Findlay & Duff 1988: 1–7; Darbyshire 1991). Certainly it is true that, in virtually every jurisdiction where the jury exists, only a very small proportion of alleged offenders have their cases heard before a jury. There are two principal reasons for this. First, the vast majority of those charged with criminal offences simply plead guilty. Second, the great majority of those ...


How Much Should Mind Matter? Mens Rea In Theft And Fraud Sentencing, James Gibson Nov 1997

How Much Should Mind Matter? Mens Rea In Theft And Fraud Sentencing, James Gibson

Law Faculty Publications

This article discusses the U.S. Sentencing Commission’s vote to potentially revise the definition of loss. Anyone who has followed the Commission's deliberations on loss will see that the proposed definition attempts to address many of the contentious issues that have arisen in the case law and commentary. The issues that the proposed definition concentrates on, however, such as credits, interest, causation, and gain, tend to inform the inquiry into "actual loss" rather than "intended loss," even though the latter concept is integral to both definitions. Although neither the current nor the proposed definition provides much guidance for ...


Section 4: Criminal Law & Procedure, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law At The William & Mary Law School Oct 1997

Section 4: Criminal Law & Procedure, Institute Of Bill Of Rights Law At The William & Mary Law School

Supreme Court Preview

No abstract provided.


Searching For A Solution: How To Punish, Restrain And Treat Sex Offenders, Nora V. Demleitner Oct 1997

Searching For A Solution: How To Punish, Restrain And Treat Sex Offenders, Nora V. Demleitner

Faculty Scholarship

Not available.


Crime And Sentencing In Canada: Parallels And Differences, Nora V. Demleitner Apr 1997

Crime And Sentencing In Canada: Parallels And Differences, Nora V. Demleitner

Faculty Scholarship

Not available


The Kindred Client - Interview With Susan Rutberg, Jorge Aquino Mar 1997

The Kindred Client - Interview With Susan Rutberg, Jorge Aquino

Interviews

Prof. Susan Rutberg is interviewed about her defense of Attorney Stephen Bingham.

In this interview for The Recorder with freelance writer Jorge Aquino, Rutberg says Bingham's trial did more than present competing theories about what happened on an especially dark day in California history. Instead, she explains, the case became a referendum on Bingham's character: Was he, as Rutberg says, "an innocent client who was caught in a web of circumstantial evidence and who had led an exemplary life"? Or was Bingham, as a prison official put it, a "dilettante revolutionary" bent on undermining prison security?


What's Guilt (Or Deterrence) Got To Do With It?: The Death Penalty, Ritual, And Mimetic Violence, 38 Wm. & Mary L. Rev. 487 (1997), Donald L. Beschle Jan 1997

What's Guilt (Or Deterrence) Got To Do With It?: The Death Penalty, Ritual, And Mimetic Violence, 38 Wm. & Mary L. Rev. 487 (1997), Donald L. Beschle

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Sistema Da Justiça Criminal Nos Estados Unidos Da América Uma Visāo Resumida, Paul Marcus Jan 1997

Sistema Da Justiça Criminal Nos Estados Unidos Da América Uma Visāo Resumida, Paul Marcus

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Race And Criminal Justice, Richard B. Collins Jan 1997

Race And Criminal Justice, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.


"Three Strikes" And The Romero Case: The Supreme Court Restores Democracy, Michael Vitiello Jan 1997

"Three Strikes" And The Romero Case: The Supreme Court Restores Democracy, Michael Vitiello

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


Representing Black Male Innocence, Joan W. Howarth Jan 1997

Representing Black Male Innocence, Joan W. Howarth

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Appendix To Guest Editor's Observations: A Proposal For A Consolidated Theft/Fraud Guideline, Frank O. Bowman Iii Jan 1997

Appendix To Guest Editor's Observations: A Proposal For A Consolidated Theft/Fraud Guideline, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

Professor Frank Bowman proposed the following consolidated theft/fraud guideline to the U.S. Sentencing Commission in October 1997. The proposal is explained in detail in a forthcoming law review article, Coping With Loss”: A Re-Examination of Federal Economic Crime Sentencing Under the Guidelines, 51 Vanderbilt L. Rev. -- (April 1998).


Guest Editor's Observations: Back To Basics: Helping The Commission Solve The "Loss" Mess With Old Familiar Tools, Frank O. Bowman Iii Jan 1997

Guest Editor's Observations: Back To Basics: Helping The Commission Solve The "Loss" Mess With Old Familiar Tools, Frank O. Bowman Iii

Faculty Publications

Roughly one-quarter of all convicted federal defendants are sentenced for some kind of economic crime.1 There is an emerging consensus that the provisions of the federal sentencing guidelines devoted to economic crime do not work very well, a consensus that has created a powerful momentum for significant change. This Issue of FSR is about whether the guidelines concerning economic offenses, principally §2B1.1 (Theft) and §2F1.1 (Fraud), should be materially altered, and if so, how. The debate that has been joined over this question is technically complex and philosophically challenging. There are disagreements over issues as particular as ...


Judicial Interference With Effective Advocacy By The Defense, Bennett L. Gershman Jan 1997

Judicial Interference With Effective Advocacy By The Defense, Bennett L. Gershman

Pace Law Faculty Publications

A fundamental premise of the American criminal justice system is defense counsel's zealous professional advocacy. Representation of a criminal defendant to be effective must be vigorous. In administering a trial, judges have a duty to ensure a fair and orderly proceeding. On occasion, however, judges overstep the line and impede defense counsel's advocacy functions unfairly. This article describes some of the ways that trial judges may violate legal and ethical standards by improperly interfering with defense counsel's courtroom functions.


Will The Punishment Fit The Victims? The Case For Pre-Trial Disclosure, And The Uncharted Future Of Victim Impact Information In Capital Jury Sentencing, José F. Anderson Jan 1997

Will The Punishment Fit The Victims? The Case For Pre-Trial Disclosure, And The Uncharted Future Of Victim Impact Information In Capital Jury Sentencing, José F. Anderson

All Faculty Scholarship

The United States Supreme Court decision in Payne v. Tennessee, upholding the use of victim impact statements in capital jury sentencing proceedings, marked one of the most dramatic reversals of a precedent in the history of United States constitutional jurisprudence. The decision in Payne expressly overruled Booth v. Maryland decided only four years earlier. The Booth case rejected the use of victim impact statements in capital sentencing cases that involved juries. In Payne, the Supreme Court made it clear that victims were entitled to offer, and juries were permitted to consider, the effect that a "death eligible" homicide had on ...


Does Privacy Really Have A Problem In The Law Of Criminal Procedure?, Daniel B. Yeager Jan 1997

Does Privacy Really Have A Problem In The Law Of Criminal Procedure?, Daniel B. Yeager

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Violence Against Aboriginal Women In Australia: Possibilities For Redress Within The International Human Rights Framework, Penelope Andrews Jan 1997

Violence Against Aboriginal Women In Australia: Possibilities For Redress Within The International Human Rights Framework, Penelope Andrews

Articles & Chapters

This Article addresses the issue of violence against Aboriginal women. Part I concerns the historical violenceagainst Aboriginal people generally, and Part II concerns violence against Aboriginal women in particular. Part III considers how the priorities and perspectives of Aboriginal women and non-Aboriginal women differ insignificant ways despite their congruence in others. In particular, the Article evaluates the awkward relationship between Aboriginal women and the largely white feminist movement in Australia as a consequence of these different priorities and perspectives, and suggests how political victories for white or non-Aboriginal women could be translated into gains for Aboriginal women. The fourth part ...


Getting To Death: Are Executions Constitutional?, Deborah W. Denno Jan 1997

Getting To Death: Are Executions Constitutional?, Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

This Article addresses the question of when a method of executing a capital defendant amounts to cruel and unusual punishment under the Eighth Amendment. This Article contends that execution methods cases, while reaching the right result, fail to provide a sufficiently comprehensive Eighth Amendment standard for determining the constitutionality of any execution method. The Article proposes a test that better comports with the Court's Eighth Amendment case law and more appropriately considers scientific determinations of excessive pain. To apply this test, the Article studies each state's legislative changes in execution methods during the Twentieth Century as well as ...


Cancelling Crime, Evan Tsen Lee Jan 1997

Cancelling Crime, Evan Tsen Lee

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Criminal History And The Purposes Of Sentencing, Aaron J. Rappaport Jan 1997

Criminal History And The Purposes Of Sentencing, Aaron J. Rappaport

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied: May A Prisoner's Challenge To Parole Revocation Be Delayed Until The Sentence Is Completed And Then Dismissed As Moot?, Jimmy Gurule Jan 1997

Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied: May A Prisoner's Challenge To Parole Revocation Be Delayed Until The Sentence Is Completed And Then Dismissed As Moot?, Jimmy Gurule

Journal Articles

A preview of Spencer v. Kemna, a 1997 Supreme Court case where a prison inmate challenged the revocation of his parole by the state of Missouri. This case is significant because the inmate initiated his challenge while in prison and continued it after he had served his sentence and was released. Substantial confusion exists in case law regarding whether such a challenge would be considered moot after the inmate had completed serving his or her sentence. At issue is if the “collateral consequences” rule applies to challenges against parole revocations. The Court has ruled that challenges by individuals against their ...


Disparate Effects In The Criminal Justice System: A Response To Randall Kennedy's Comment, Janai S. Nelson Jan 1997

Disparate Effects In The Criminal Justice System: A Response To Randall Kennedy's Comment, Janai S. Nelson

Faculty Publications

For many African Americans, the criminal justice system symbolizes an oppressive force, and yet, is a necessary institution in an increasingly lawless society. African Americans are at the same time its victims and beneficiaries, although various sentiments exist regarding the extent to which they are either. It is precisely this paradox, coupled with the promulgation of certain criminal legislation and legal precedent which directly and, potentially, adversely affect the African-American community that inspired the author to address the issues and arguments raised in Randall Kennedy's The State, Criminal Law, and Racial Discrimination: A Comment, 107 Harv. L. Rev. 1255 ...


Whoever Fights Monsters Should See To It That In The Process He Does Not Become A Monster: Hunting The Sexual Predator With Silver Bullets -- Federal Rules Of Evidence 413-415 -- And A Stake Through The Heart -- Kansas V. Hendricks, Joelle A. Moreno Jan 1997

Whoever Fights Monsters Should See To It That In The Process He Does Not Become A Monster: Hunting The Sexual Predator With Silver Bullets -- Federal Rules Of Evidence 413-415 -- And A Stake Through The Heart -- Kansas V. Hendricks, Joelle A. Moreno

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Jury As Catalyst For The Reform Of Criminal Evidentiary Procedure In Continental Europe: The Cases Of Russia And Spain, Stephen C. Thaman Jan 1997

The Jury As Catalyst For The Reform Of Criminal Evidentiary Procedure In Continental Europe: The Cases Of Russia And Spain, Stephen C. Thaman

All Faculty Scholarship

This paper focuses on the dialectic between the search for truth, adversarial procedure, and lay participation in the preparation, presentation, and evaluation of evidence in criminal trials. Its primary focus is on the reintroduction of trial by jury in two classic inquisitorial criminal justice systems, Russia (1993) and Spain (1995), as a catalyst in those countries’ move to adversary procedure. It focuses on the effect of the jury system on preparing evidence for trial, the presentation of evidence at trial, and the evaluation of evidence.


Making Constitutional Doctrine In A Realist Age, Victoria Nourse Jan 1997

Making Constitutional Doctrine In A Realist Age, Victoria Nourse

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In this article the author considers three examples of modern constitutional doctrine that show how judges have stolen bits and pieces from popularized skepticisms about the job of judging and have molded this stolen rhetoric into doctrine. In the first example, she asks whether constitutional law's recent penchant for doctrinal rules based on "clear law" could have existed without the modern age's obsession with legal uncertainty. In the second, the author considers whether our contemporary rhetoric of constitutional "interests" and "expectations" reflects modern critiques of doctrine as failing to address social needs. In the third, she asks how ...


Waiting For The Verdict On Spain's New Jury System, Stephen C. Thaman Jan 1997

Waiting For The Verdict On Spain's New Jury System, Stephen C. Thaman

All Faculty Scholarship

This article discusses Spain’s history of trial by jury, focusing on the reinstatement of trial by jury in Spain by the 1995 jury legislation implementing Article 125 of the post-Franco Spanish Constitution. It discusses key provisions of the new Spanish jury law with illustrations from the cases of Otegi and others. It also predicts as to whether the classic jury will acquit itself as a catalyst for criminal justice reform in a Civil Law system such as that of Spain.


Representing Black Male Innocence, Joan W. Howarth Jan 1997

Representing Black Male Innocence, Joan W. Howarth

Scholarly Works

This Article is a case study of a California capital case. Drawing on cultural studies, the first part develops the social construction of Black male gang member, especially as that identity is understood within white imaginations. The powerful and frightening idea of a Black man who is a gang member, even gang leader, captured the imagination and moral passion of the decisionmakers in this case, recasting and reframing the evidence in furtherance of this idea. In fundamental ways, this idea or imposed identity is fundamentally inconsistent with any American concept of innocence.

The second part uses the case to investigate ...


Lynching Ethics: Toward A Theory Of Racialized Defenses, Anthony V. Alfieri Jan 1997

Lynching Ethics: Toward A Theory Of Racialized Defenses, Anthony V. Alfieri

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Jury As Critic: An Empirical Look At How Capital Juries Perceive Expert And Lay Testimony, Scott E. Sundby Jan 1997

The Jury As Critic: An Empirical Look At How Capital Juries Perceive Expert And Lay Testimony, Scott E. Sundby

Articles

No abstract provided.