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Criminal Procedure

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

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Kentucky Law Survey: Criminal Procedure, William H. Fortune, Sarah N. Welling Jan 1984

Kentucky Law Survey: Criminal Procedure, William H. Fortune, Sarah N. Welling

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

Significant criminal procedure decisions of the Kentucky appellate courts for the period July 1, 1982 to July 1, 1983, have been selected for discussion in this Survey. Included in this survey is an extensive discussion of selected cases in the areas of warrants, competency of counsel, pretrial discovery of witness statements, venue, belated attacks on criminal convictions, and the right to talk to an attorney before taking a breathalyzer test.


Presuming Lawyers Competent To Protect Fundamental Rights: Is It An Affordable Fiction?, Robert G. Lawson Jan 1978

Presuming Lawyers Competent To Protect Fundamental Rights: Is It An Affordable Fiction?, Robert G. Lawson

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

This article explores the ramifications of Wainwright v. Sykes, a case decided before the Supreme Court of the United States in 1977. The broad question before the Court in Sykes concerned the extent to which state prisoners should have access to federal court by use of the writ of habeas corpus. The narrow issue before the Court concerned the impact on a prisoner's claim for habeas relief of procedural defaults (such as a failure to object to evidence, a failure to perfect an appeal, etc.) that occur in the state proceeding under attack. In considering these important issues Justice ...


Kentucky Law Survey: Criminal Procedure, Rutheford B. Campbell Jr. Jan 1975

Kentucky Law Survey: Criminal Procedure, Rutheford B. Campbell Jr.

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

In 1974, the Kentucky Court of Appeals decided a number of criminal procedure cases. Although these included cases involving prisoners’ rights, probation revocation procedure, and discovery, the more significant decisions were in the area of the right of effective assistance of counsel and the area of search and seizure. It is to these latter two areas that the author will limit his discussion.