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Supreme Court

Southern Methodist University

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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Cognitive Bias, The 'Band Of Experts,' And The Anti-Litigation Narrative, Elizabeth G. Thornburg Jan 2016

Cognitive Bias, The 'Band Of Experts,' And The Anti-Litigation Narrative, Elizabeth G. Thornburg

Faculty Scholarship

In December of 2015, yet another set of discovery rule amendments that are designed to limit discovery will go into effect. This article argues that the consistent pattern of discovery retrenchment is no accident. Rather, a combination of forces is at work. The Supreme Court consistently signals its contempt for the discovery process, and the Chief Justice’s pattern of appointments to the Rules Committees skews toward Big Law defense-side lawyers and judges appointed by Republican Presidents. In addition, longstanding corporate media campaigns have created and reinforced an anti-litigation narrative that, through the power of repetition, dominates public discourse. Further ...


The Supreme Court And Voting Rights: A More Complete Exit Strategy, Grant M. Hayden Jan 2005

The Supreme Court And Voting Rights: A More Complete Exit Strategy, Grant M. Hayden

Faculty Scholarship

To the great relief of many observers, the Supreme Court has recently become more deferential to state legislatures with respect to their political redistricting plans. The only problem is that the Court appears to be in no mood to revisit some of the cases that got it entangled in the political thicket to begin with - the ones rigorously applying the one person, one vote standard. Indeed, it recently issued a summary affirmance of a lower court decision that tightened up its already exacting standards regarding population equality. As a result, the Court's partial retreat from politics is doing more ...


Litigating The Zero-Sum Game: The Effect Of Institutional Reform Litigation On Absent Parties, Elizabeth G. Thornburg Jan 1987

Litigating The Zero-Sum Game: The Effect Of Institutional Reform Litigation On Absent Parties, Elizabeth G. Thornburg

Faculty Scholarship

This article considers the impact that the use and misuse of equitable interest balancing has had on institutional reform litigation. It begins by considering the types of cases in which interest balancing was originally used in equity, and then surveys the use of interest balancing in school desegregation and employment discrimination cases. The article argues that the Supreme Court's interest balancing is flawed in systemic ways that result in overvaluing non-party interests.