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Full-Text Articles in Law

Loving's Legacy: Decriminalization And The Regulation Of Sex And Sexuality, Melissa Murray Apr 2108

Loving's Legacy: Decriminalization And The Regulation Of Sex And Sexuality, Melissa Murray

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Brock Turner: Sorting Through The Noise, Michael Vitiello Jan 2108

Brock Turner: Sorting Through The Noise, Michael Vitiello

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

PART I. THE MEDIA’S ROLE ............................................................................... 634

A. Six Months for Rape? ............................................................................ 634

B. Okay, But Sixth Months for Sexual Assault? ......................................... 638

C. But Vitiello, You are Cherry-Picking the Facts ..................................... 643

D. But Judge Persky Showed Bias, Racial or Otherwise ........................... 646

PART II: TAKING THE WRONG PATH TOWARDS RECALL ................................... 649

A. Existing Checks on Judicial Misconduct ............................................... 650

B. What’s Not to Like About Recall? ......................................................... 652

III. CONCLUDING THOUGHTS ............................................................................. 659


Social Networking Sites And Learning In International Relations: The Impact Of Platforms, Josh Pallas, Joakim Eidenfalk, Susan N. Engel Jan 2019

Social Networking Sites And Learning In International Relations: The Impact Of Platforms, Josh Pallas, Joakim Eidenfalk, Susan N. Engel

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article reports on a pilot undergraduate subject that incorporated a range of technology-enhanced learning approaches including online lectures, an online site for in and out of class communications, and strong encouragement for students to blog and use Twitter. This paper evaluates student engagement through the social networking sites (SNS), focusing on the online communication and content platform. We examine whether changing from an educationally oriented SNS platform to Facebook impacted on student engagement and feedback. To achieve this, both empirical data and qualitative student feedback were used.


Finding Law, Stephen E. Sachs Jan 2019

Finding Law, Stephen E. Sachs

Faculty Scholarship

That the judge's task is to find the law, not to make it, was once a commonplace of our legal culture. Today, decades after Erie, the idea of a common law discovered by judges is commonly dismissed -- as a "fallacy," an "illusion," a "brooding omnipresence in the sky." That dismissive view is wrong. Expecting judges to find unwritten law is no childish fiction of the benighted past, but a real and plausible option for a modern legal system.

This Essay seeks to restore the respectability of finding law, in part by responding to two criticisms made by Erie and ...


A. Harold Weber Writing Award, Notre Dame Law School Jan 2019

A. Harold Weber Writing Award, Notre Dame Law School

Student, Faculty, and Staff Awards

For Excellence in Legal Writing
What will it profit you to know all the law and the prophets if you lack the power to make these clear to others? – Lloyd T. Stryker


#Metoo Meets The Ministerial Exception: Sexual Harassment Claims By Clergy And The First Amendment's Religion Clauses, Ira C. Lupu, Robert W. Tuttle Jan 2019

#Metoo Meets The Ministerial Exception: Sexual Harassment Claims By Clergy And The First Amendment's Religion Clauses, Ira C. Lupu, Robert W. Tuttle

GW Law Faculty Publications & Other Works

In Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church & School v. EEOC (2012), the Supreme Court unanimously held that the Religion Clauses of the First Amendment create a “ministerial exception” to certain employment laws. The ministerial exception bars claims by clergy of wrongful dismissal by religious institutions. In the years before Hosanna-Tabor, however, courts had ruled in four prominent decisions – two state, and two federal – that suits by clergy for sexual harassment
based on a pervasively hostile environment could go forward, notwithstanding the ministerial exception. The rise of the #MeToo movement invites new and more detailed consideration of the tension between the policies behind sexual harassment law and the constitutional values protected by the ministerial exception.

Part I describes the contours of the ministerial exception, explains its constitutional provenance, and highlights the issues left open by Hosanna-Tabor. Part II addresses relevant developments in the law of sexual harassment, from the pioneering work of Professor Catherine MacKinnon, through and including the Supreme Court’s decisions in Burlington Industries v. Ellerth and Faragher v. City of Boca Raton.

Part III explores the leading judicial opinions on the relationship between sexual harassment law and the ministerial exception. These include the germinal state court decisions in Black v. Snyder (Minnesota) and McKelvey v. Pierce (New Jersey), and the path breaking 9th Circuit decisions in Bollard v. California Province of the Society of Jesus, and Elvig v. Calvin Presbyterian Church. In the law that has emerged, the ministerial exception bars adverse job action claims by clergy but does not bar hostile environment claims. That brief statement, however, masks the analytical complexities and constitutional concerns arising from the interplay between harassment law and the ministerial exception. The sources of tension include the affirmative defenses, requiring employer-created mechanisms for reasonable prevention and correction in sexual harassment cases, as well as matters of discovery and choice of remedies.

Part IV applies our theoretical and doctrinal insights to the major questions raised by this interplay. We explain why the ministerial exception is constitutionally sound, but nevertheless should not bar damage claims for pervasive, hostile environments based on sex. We offer a tort-based theory of harm as the underpinning of hostile environment doctrine; analyze the tenuous connection between religious belief and sexual harassment of clergy; and unpack constitutional questions of entanglement between church and state that may arise when religious institutions face hostile environment lawsuits. Our analysis should be of interest to scholars of employment law and the Religion Clauses, lawyers litigating such cases, and judges who must decide them.

In Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church & School v. EEOC (2012), the Supreme Court unanimously held that the Religion Clauses of the First Amendment create a “ministerial exception” to certain employment laws. The ministerial exception bars claims by clergy of wrongful dismissal by religious institutions. In the years before Hosanna-Tabor, however, courts had ruled in four prominent decisions – two state, and two federal – that suits by clergy for sexual harassment
based on a pervasively hostile environment could go forward, notwithstanding the ministerial exception. The rise of the #MeToo movement invites new and more detailed consideration of the tension between the policies behind sexual harassment law and the constitutional values protected by the ministerial exception.

Part I describes the contours of the ministerial exception, explains its constitutional provenance, and highlights the issues left open by Hosanna-Tabor. Part II addresses relevant developments in the law of sexual harassment, from the pioneering work of Professor Catherine MacKinnon, through and including the Supreme Court’s decisions in Burlington Industries v. Ellerth and Faragher v. City of Boca Raton.

Part III explores the leading judicial opinions on the relationship between sexual harassment law and the ministerial exception. These include the germinal state court decisions in Black v. Snyder (Minnesota) and McKelvey v. Pierce (New Jersey), and the path breaking 9th Circuit decisions in Bollard v. California Province of the Society of Jesus, and Elvig v. Calvin Presbyterian Church. In the law that has emerged, the ministerial exception bars adverse job action claims by clergy but does
not bar hostile environment claims. That brief statement, however, masks the analytical complexities and constitutional concerns arising from the interplay between harassment law and the ministerial exception. The sources of tension include the affirmative defenses, requiring employer-created mechanisms for reasonable prevention and correction in sexual harassment cases, as well as matters of discovery and choice of remedies.

Part IV applies our theoretical and doctrinal insights to the major questions raised by this interplay. We explain why the ministerial exception is constitutionally sound, but nevertheless should not bar damage claims for pervasive, hostile environments based on sex. We offer a tort-based theory of harm as the underpinning of hostile environment doctrine; analyze the tenuous connection between religious belief and sexual harassment of clergy; and unpack constitutional questions of entanglement between church and state that may arise when religious institutions face hostile environment lawsuits. Our ...


Mmu: 12/11/17 - 12/17/17, Notre Dame Law School Dec 2018

Mmu: 12/11/17 - 12/17/17, Notre Dame Law School

Monday Morning Update

The Monday Morning Update, or MMU as it is referred to by students, is a weekly email newsletter of news, events, and opportunities of special interest to Notre Dame Law School students.


Clinical And Experiential Learning In Canadian Law Schools: Current Perspectives, Gemma Smyth, Samantha Hale, Neil Gold Oct 2018

Clinical And Experiential Learning In Canadian Law Schools: Current Perspectives, Gemma Smyth, Samantha Hale, Neil Gold

Law Publications

What are some of the challenges and possibilities animating modern Canadian clinical and experiential learning in law? This question was the starting point for our research, which examined two sets of data. In the first part of this project, we analyzed available information on existing clinical and experiential learning programs in Canadian law schools. This data revealed a growing quantity and variety of programs across the country. We then held qualitative interviews with deans, professors, and clinicians across Canada regarding their views of clinical and experiential learning. While the interviews suggested that many of the same financial and curricular challenges ...


How Irrational Actors In The Ceo Suite Affect Corporate Governance, Renee M. Jones Aug 2018

How Irrational Actors In The Ceo Suite Affect Corporate Governance, Renee M. Jones

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


Response Regarding Bureau Financial Education Programs (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0015), Carly Urban, J. Michael Collins, Stephanie Moulton, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators Jul 2018

Response Regarding Bureau Financial Education Programs (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0015), Carly Urban, J. Michael Collins, Stephanie Moulton, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

Response discussing whether the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau should continue its financial education programs.


Response Regarding Bureau Guidance And Implementation Support (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0013), Adam J. Levitin, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators Jul 2018

Response Regarding Bureau Guidance And Implementation Support (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0013), Adam J. Levitin, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

No abstract provided.


The Certification Paradox, Jonathan M. Barnett Jul 2018

The Certification Paradox, Jonathan M. Barnett

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

It is commonly observed that certification intermediaries mitigate informational asymmetries by “lending” reputational capital to support transacting parties’ quality commitments. However, this proposition is challenged by cases in which well-established intermediaries have failed to detect fraud, misrepresentation and other misbehavior. The “certification paradox” provides a more nuanced account that anticipates both the general success, and periodic failure, of certification intermediaries. Transacting parties minimize search and evaluation costs by using a small number of certification intermediaries with large stocks of reputational capital. Incumbent certifiers are substantially protected by entrants’ high costs of accumulating sufficient reputational capital and users’ high costs of ...


Special Interest Influence Under Direct Versus Representative Democracy, John G. Matsusaka Jul 2018

Special Interest Influence Under Direct Versus Representative Democracy, John G. Matsusaka

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

The ability of economic interest groups to influence policy is a common theme in economics and political science. Most theories posit that interest group power arises from the ability to influence elected or appointed government officials through vote-buying, lobbying, or revolving doors; that is, by exploiting the representative part of democracy. This raises the question: does special interest influence decline when policy is chosen using direct democracy, without involvement of representatives? An analysis of the content of the universe of state-level ballot initiatives during 1904-2017 reveals that business interests have been worse off as a result of initiatives across major ...


Notice Of Motion For Leave To Appear As Amici Curiae By Norman Y. Mineta, The Sakamoto Sisters, The Council On American-Islamic Relations, New York, Inc., And The Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality, Lorraine K. Bannai, Robert S. Chang, Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality, Attorneys For Amicus Curiae Jul 2018

Notice Of Motion For Leave To Appear As Amici Curiae By Norman Y. Mineta, The Sakamoto Sisters, The Council On American-Islamic Relations, New York, Inc., And The Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality, Lorraine K. Bannai, Robert S. Chang, Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality, Attorneys For Amicus Curiae

Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

New York Immigration Coalition, Casa de Maryland, American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, ADC Research Institute, and Make the Road New York, v. United States Department of Commerce and Bureau of the Census


Is Government Really Broken?, Cary Coglianese Jul 2018

Is Government Really Broken?, Cary Coglianese

Faculty Scholarship

The widespread public angst that surfaced around the 2016 presidential election in the United States revealed that many Americans believe their government has become badly broken. Given the serious problems that continue to persist in society—crime, illiteracy, unemployment, poverty, discrimination, and more—these beliefs in a government breakdown are understandable. Yet a breakdown is actually far from self-evident. In this paper, I explain how diagnoses of governmental performance depend on the perspective from which current conditions in the country are viewed. Certainly when judged against a standard of perfection, America has a long way to go. But perfection is ...


Enforcing/Protection: The Danger Of Chevron In Refugee Act Cases, Maureen A. Sweeney Jul 2018

Enforcing/Protection: The Danger Of Chevron In Refugee Act Cases, Maureen A. Sweeney

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Justice Kennedy’S Controversial Judicial Philosophy, Described By A Former Clerk, Nancy Amoury Combs Jul 2018

Justice Kennedy’S Controversial Judicial Philosophy, Described By A Former Clerk, Nancy Amoury Combs

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Allocation Rules And The Stability Of Mass Tort Class Actions, Joshua C. Teitelbaum Jul 2018

Allocation Rules And The Stability Of Mass Tort Class Actions, Joshua C. Teitelbaum

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This paper studies the effects of allocation rules on the stability of mass tort class actions. I analyze a two-stage model in which a defendant faces multiple plaintiffs with heterogeneous damage claims. In stage 1, the plaintiffs play a noncooperative coalition formation game. In stage 2, the class action and any individual actions by opt-out plaintiffs are litigated or settled. I examine how the method for allocating the class recovery interacts with other factors---the shape of the damage claims distribution, the scale benefits of the class action, and the plaintiffs' probability of prevailing at trial and bargaining power in settlement ...


Balanced Judicial Realism In The Service Of Justice: Judge Richard D. Cudahy, Elizabeth Mertz, Cynthia Grant Bowman Jul 2018

Balanced Judicial Realism In The Service Of Justice: Judge Richard D. Cudahy, Elizabeth Mertz, Cynthia Grant Bowman

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

There is a quiet irony to be found in scholarly writings about the judiciary, which often center around high-profile jurists selected as the “great” judges. But there are great judges who do not receive or even want such widespread recognition, and who do not discuss their philosophy of judging—they simply focus on the job in front of them. Judges who operate with humility can often be very quiet about their legacies—brushing the issue off, as if uncomfortable with the attention. Anyone who knew Judge Richard D. Cudahy of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ...


The Impact Of The Singapore International Commercial Court And Hague Convention On Choice Of Court Agreements On Singapore’S Private International Law, Wei Yao, Kenny Chng Jul 2018

The Impact Of The Singapore International Commercial Court And Hague Convention On Choice Of Court Agreements On Singapore’S Private International Law, Wei Yao, Kenny Chng

Research Collection School Of Law

The advent of the Singapore International Commercial Court (SICC) and the enactment of the Hague Convention on Choiceof Court Agreements 2005 (the Hague Convention) in Singapore presents an intriguing case study of the issues raised by theco-mingling of the rules of an international convention, jurisdictional rules for an international commercial court, andtraditional common law jurisdictional principles within the private international law and procedural rules of a singlenational jurisdiction. This article highlights several key issues raised by the interaction between the SICC, HagueConvention, and common law jurisdictional rules, and proposes solutions to streamline these three sets of rules into acoherent and ...


A Bibliography Of Faculty Scholarship, Law Library Jul 2018

A Bibliography Of Faculty Scholarship, Law Library

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

The purpose of this bibliography is to record in one place the substantial body of scholarship produced by the current faculty at the Catholic University, Columbus School of Law. From its humble beginnings under the tutelage of founding Dean William Callyhan Robinson, through its adolescent period when, like so many other American law schools, it was trying to define its pedagogical niche, to its eventual merger with the Columbus University Law School in 1954, the law school at Catholic University has always retained a scholarly and remarkably productive faculty. The sheer quantity of writing, the breadth of research and the ...


Law & Health Care Newsletter Jul 2018

Law & Health Care Newsletter

Law & Health Care Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Empiricism And Privacy Policies In The Restatement Of Consumer Contract Law, Gregory Klass Jul 2018

Empiricism And Privacy Policies In The Restatement Of Consumer Contract Law, Gregory Klass

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The draft Restatement of the Law of Consumer Contracts includes a quantitative study of judicial decisions concerning businesses’ online privacy policies, which it cites in support of a claim that most courts treat privacy policies as contracts. This article reports an attempt to reproduce that study’s results. Using the original study’s data, this study was unable to reproduce its numerical findings. This study found in the data fewer relevant decisions, and a lower proportion of decisions supporting the Restatement position. This study also found little support for the claim that there is a clear trend recognizing enforcing privacy ...


Passive Investors, Jill E. Fisch, Asaf Hamdani, Steven Davidoff Solomon Jun 2018

Passive Investors, Jill E. Fisch, Asaf Hamdani, Steven Davidoff Solomon

Faculty Scholarship

The increasing percentage of the modern capital markets owned by passive investors – index funds and ETFs – has received extensive media and academic attention. This growing ownership concentration as well as the potential power of passive investors to affect both corporate governance and operational decision-making at their portfolio firms has led some commentators to call for passive investors to be subject to increased regulation and even disenfranchisement. These reactions fail to account for the institutional structure of passive investors and the market context in which they operate. Specifically, this literature assumes that passive investors compete primarily on cost and that, as ...


Why Is It Wrong To Punish Thought?, Gabriel S. Mendlow Jun 2018

Why Is It Wrong To Punish Thought?, Gabriel S. Mendlow

Articles

It’s a venerable maxim of criminal jurisprudence that the state must never punish people for their mere thoughts—for their beliefs, desires, fantasies, and unexecuted intentions. This maxim is all but unquestioned, yet its true justification is something of a mystery. In this Essay, I argue that each of the prevailing justifications is deficient, and I conclude by proposing a novel one. The proposed justification captures the widely shared intuition that punishing a person for her mere thoughts isn’t simply disfavored by the balance of reasons but is morally wrongful in itself, an intrinsic (i.e., consequence-independent) injustice ...


West Sunset 2050 Trust V. Nationstar Mortgage, L.L.C., 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 47 (Jun. 28, 2018), Shaneka J. Malloyd Jun 2018

West Sunset 2050 Trust V. Nationstar Mortgage, L.L.C., 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 47 (Jun. 28, 2018), Shaneka J. Malloyd

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court found that a foreclosure sale is not invalid due to lack of notice where: (1) a homeowners association (HOA) fails to serve the Notice of Default (NOD) to the recorded beneficiary of the deed of trust and (2) that recorded beneficiary’s successor in interest is unable to demonstrate how it was prejudiced or injured by the defective notice to their predecessor in interest. Further, a HOA does not lose standing to foreclose on a property when it enters into a factoring agreement that does not change the relationship between debtor and lender.


Response Regarding Inherited Regulations And Inherited Rulemaking Authorities (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0012), Kathleen Engel, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators Jun 2018

Response Regarding Inherited Regulations And Inherited Rulemaking Authorities (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0012), Kathleen Engel, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

Response offering comment on the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau's inherited regulations and inherited rulemaking authorities.


Rwu First Amendment Blog: David Logan's Blog: Discovering Trump 06-22-2018, David A. Logan Jun 2018

Rwu First Amendment Blog: David Logan's Blog: Discovering Trump 06-22-2018, David A. Logan

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Is Antitrust's Consumer Welfare Principle Imperiled?, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Jun 2018

Is Antitrust's Consumer Welfare Principle Imperiled?, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship

Antitrust’s consumer welfare principle stands for the proposition that antitrust policy should encourage markets to produce output as high as is consistent with sustainable competition, and prices that are accordingly as low. Such a policy does not protect every interest group. For example, it opposes the interests of cartels or other competition-limiting associations who profit from lower output and higher prices. It also runs counter to the interest of less competitive firms that need higher prices in order to survive. Market structure is relevant to antitrust policy, but its importance is contingent rather than absolute – that is, market structure ...


Martin Luther King Jr. And Pretext Stops (And Arrests): Reflections On How Far We Have Not Come Fifty Years Later, Tracey Maclin, Maria Savarese Jun 2018

Martin Luther King Jr. And Pretext Stops (And Arrests): Reflections On How Far We Have Not Come Fifty Years Later, Tracey Maclin, Maria Savarese

Faculty Scholarship

By January, 1956, the Montgomery Bus boycott was in full-swing. Black citizens in Montgomery, Alabama were refusing to ride the city’s private buses to protest racially segregated seating. On the afternoon of January 26, 1956, twenty-seven-year-old Martin Luther King, Jr. had finished his day of work at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. On his drive home, King stopped his vehicle to offer a ride to a group of bus boycotters standing at a downtown car-pool location. After the boycotters entered King’s car, two motorcycle policemen pulled-in behind King’s vehicle. While everyone in King’s car ...