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Full-Text Articles in Law

Prolegomenon To A Defense Of The City Of Gold, David A. Westbrook Mar 2017

Prolegomenon To A Defense Of The City Of Gold, David A. Westbrook

Journal Articles

In recent political contests, economics has been used as a subjective language of disputation and identification, contradicting the field's traditional aspirations to objectivity, even science. In both partisan politics and the related but not identical bifurcation between "populist" and "establishment" or "elite" discourse, positions have become routinized into antagonistic tropes. This poses a serious problem for the United States, which uses political discourse not only for politics, but to create social cohesion among disparate groups. More generally, elites bereft of Marx no longer have a grammar with which to conceptualize, critique, and ultimately defend the global liberal order that ...


The Altruistic Rich? Inequality And Other-Regarding Preferences For Redistribution, Matthew Dimick, David Rueda, Daniel Stegmueller Feb 2017

The Altruistic Rich? Inequality And Other-Regarding Preferences For Redistribution, Matthew Dimick, David Rueda, Daniel Stegmueller

Journal Articles

What determines support among individuals for redistributive policies? Do individuals care about others when they assess the consequences of redistribution? This article proposes a model of other-regarding preferences for redistribution, which we term income-dependent altruism. Our model predicts that an individual’s preferred level of redistribution is decreasing in income, increasing in inequality, and, more importantly, that the inequality effect is increasing in income. Thus, even though the rich prefer less redistribution than the poor, the rich are more responsive, in a positive way, to changes in inequality than are the poor. We contrast these results with several other prominent ...


Constitutional Economic Justice: Structural Power For "We The People", Martha T. Mccluskey Jan 2017

Constitutional Economic Justice: Structural Power For "We The People", Martha T. Mccluskey

Journal Articles

Toward that goal, this essay proposes a structural principle of collective economic power for “we the people.” This principle is both consistent with longstanding Constitutional ideals and tailored to the current challenges of neoliberal ideology and policy. It develops two premises: first, it rejects the neoliberal economic ideology that defines legitimate power and freedom as individualized “choice” constrained by an existing political economy. Instead, this proposed principle recognizes that meaningful political economic freedom and power fundamentally consist of access to collective organizations with potential to create a “more perfect union” with better and less constrained options. Second, the post-Lochner principle ...


Money Norms, Julia Y. Lee Jan 2017

Money Norms, Julia Y. Lee

Journal Articles

Money norms present a fundamental contradiction. Norms embody the social sphere, a system of internalized values, unwritten rules, and shared expectations that informally govern human behavior. Money, on the other hand, evokes the economic sphere of markets, prices, and incentives. Existing legal scholarship keeps the two spheres distinct. Money is assumed to operate as a medium of exchange or as a tool for altering the payoffs of different actions. When used to make good behavior less costly and undesirable behavior more costly, money functions to incentivize, sanction, and deter. Although a rich literature on the expressive function of law exists ...


How The United States Postal Service (Usps) Could Encourage More Local Economic Development, Randall K. Johnson Jan 2017

How The United States Postal Service (Usps) Could Encourage More Local Economic Development, Randall K. Johnson

Journal Articles

Over the last ten years, the United States Congress has made it increasingly difficult for the United States Postal Service ("USPS")1 to encourage economic development on the ground. Congress has deprived the USPS of its traditional means of achieving local economic development goals, which have largely benefited sub-national governments by providing indirect federal subsidies. This deprivation has occurred, at least in part, through the 2006 Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act ("PAE Act"), which expressly limits the USPS's right to offer certain non-services like domestic money transfers and other financial products. In an attempt to provide a measure of ...