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Full-Text Articles in Law

Review Of The Effectiveness Of The 1.30am Lock Outs, 3am Cessation Of Liquor Sales, 10pm Take-Away Liquor Laws And The Annual Liquor Licence Fee Program, Julia Quilter, Luke J. Mcnamara Jan 2016

Review Of The Effectiveness Of The 1.30am Lock Outs, 3am Cessation Of Liquor Sales, 10pm Take-Away Liquor Laws And The Annual Liquor Licence Fee Program, Julia Quilter, Luke J. Mcnamara

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

No abstract provided.


Fish, Food Security And Health In Pacific Island Countries And Territories: A Systematic Literature Review, Karen E. Charlton, Joanna Russell, Emma Gorman, Quentin A. Hanich, Aurelie Delisle, Brooke M. Campbell, Johann D. Bell Jan 2016

Fish, Food Security And Health In Pacific Island Countries And Territories: A Systematic Literature Review, Karen E. Charlton, Joanna Russell, Emma Gorman, Quentin A. Hanich, Aurelie Delisle, Brooke M. Campbell, Johann D. Bell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Background: Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) face a double burden of disease, with a high prevalence of household food insecurity and childhood micronutrient deficiencies, accompanied by a burgeoning increase in adult obesity, diabetes and heart disease. Methods: A systematic literature review was undertaken to assess whether increased availability of, and access to, fish improves a) household food security and b) individual nutritional status. Results: A total of 29 studies were reviewed. Fourteen studies identified fish as the primary food source for Pacific Islanders and five studies reported fish/seafood as the primary source of dietary protein. Fish consumption varied ...


Review Of "Transcultural Writers And Novels In The Age Of Global Mobility", Michael R. Jacklin Jan 2016

Review Of "Transcultural Writers And Novels In The Age Of Global Mobility", Michael R. Jacklin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Mobility is a fact of contemporary life. Whether voluntary or forced, experiences of relocation are shaping the lives of millions and, increasingly, literature is turning to matters of transcultural and translingual identity that follow such relocations.


Book Review: Constructing An Avant Garde: Art In Brazil, 1949-1979 By S. Martins, Michael Leggett Jan 2015

Book Review: Constructing An Avant Garde: Art In Brazil, 1949-1979 By S. Martins, Michael Leggett

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

To anyone unfamiliar with the interventions made by avant-garde artists into the art world and occasionally wider society during the middle of the 20th century, this volume delivers a very readable account. The artists, the objects they made and the discussions they generated are selected here in relation to the particular practices and contexts emergent in Brazil following the chaos of World War II (during which the country remained neutral). In keeping with a historiographical approach—rather than an art historical account—the author introduces an initial group of Brazilian artists attracted to ideas concerned with the nature of the ...


Review Of "Persuading Plato", Michael R. Jacklin Jan 2015

Review Of "Persuading Plato", Michael R. Jacklin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Translingual writing is an aspect of literary production that is receiving increasing attention from scholars worldwide. In a recent issue of L2 Journal, editors Stephen Kellman and Natasha Lvovich argue that although translingual writing – that is, writing across languages, or writing in a language that is not the author’s first – may be as old as the earliest forms of alphabetic script, its practice has become especially widespread in contemporary culture.1 With the mass movements of peoples through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the works of writers who have chosen to write in a language which is not their ...


Book Review: The History Of Democracy: A Marxist Interpretation By Brian S. Roper, John Passant Jan 2015

Book Review: The History Of Democracy: A Marxist Interpretation By Brian S. Roper, John Passant

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Brian Roper's book on the history of democracy from a Marxist perspective is an ambitious one. Roper starts with Athens and Rome and then, as capitalism rises, examines the revolutions in England, America and France and after that the 1848 revolutions across Europe. He then looks at the Paris Commune and The Russian Revolution. In doing this, Roper describes three distinct but related forms of democracy - Athenian democracy which was a form of participatory democracy limited to sections of society; liberal representative democracy which, while nominally open to all, is actually limited to operating within narrow propertied confines; and ...


Book Review: John S. Ahlquist And Margaret Levi, In The Interest Of Others: Organizations And Social Activism, Rowan Cahill Jan 2015

Book Review: John S. Ahlquist And Margaret Levi, In The Interest Of Others: Organizations And Social Activism, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

As the poet John Donne famously meditated in 1624, and Ernest Hemingway echoed in 1940, "No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent." John S. Ahlquist and Margaret Levi are interested in this sense of human and social ecology, and investigate it via a comparative study of the memberships, structures, and politics of a target group of American and Australian trade unions.


Book Review: The End Of Laissez-Faire? On The Durability Of Embedded Neoliberalism, Timothy Dimuzio Jan 2015

Book Review: The End Of Laissez-Faire? On The Durability Of Embedded Neoliberalism, Timothy Dimuzio

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

On the heels of the global financial crisis, many on the left of the political spectrum anticipated the end of neoliberalism. The financial and economic crisis—global in scope—had supposedly discredited over two decades of neoliberal rule. The massive state interventions required to curtail the worst vagaries of the crisis demonstrated to everyone paying even the remotest attention that deregulated markets are unstable, that bankers cannot be trusted with increasing the money supply and that government intervention could help steer the economy in a more positive direction should politicians be willing. Moreover, the aftermath of the crisis spawned the ...


Book Review: David Walker And Agniezka Sobocinska, Eds. Australia's Asia: From Yellow Peril To Asian Century, Julia T. Martinez Jan 2014

Book Review: David Walker And Agniezka Sobocinska, Eds. Australia's Asia: From Yellow Peril To Asian Century, Julia T. Martinez

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Australia's Asia is a timely collection that offers an historical background to the recent debates on Australia's Asian Century. As the use of the term 'yellow peril' in the subtitle suggests, there is a strong emphasis in this book on Australia's ongoing anxieties about the rise of Asia.


Not For Punishment: We Need To Understand Bail, Not Review It, Julia Quilter Jan 2014

Not For Punishment: We Need To Understand Bail, Not Review It, Julia Quilter

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Courts make hundreds of bail decisions every week but we rarely hear about them. In the past month in New South Wales, however, we have heard much about three high-profile decisions granting bail to: Steven Fesus, accused of murdering his wife 17 years ago; Hassan “Sam” Ibrahim, charged with selling illegal firearms across western Sydney (bail was revoked on appeal); and Mahmoud Hawi, charged with the murder of Peter Zervas during a brawl at Sydney Airport in 2009.

Each was granted bail under the Bail Act 2013, which came into force on May 20 this year. The allegations these men ...


History Foundation To Year 12 (In Review Of The Australian Curriculum - Supplementary Material), Gregory Melleuish Jan 2014

History Foundation To Year 12 (In Review Of The Australian Curriculum - Supplementary Material), Gregory Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Australian history curriculum is compulsory for Years Foundation through to Year 10. It states that its rationale is as follows: ‘The curriculum generally takes a world history approach within which the history of Australia is taught.’ The curriculum is also defined, and limited, by its three cross-curriculum priorities:

* Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

* Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia

* Sustainability.


Review Of "Speaking The Earth's Languages: A Theory For Australian-Chilean Postcolonial Poetics', Michael R. Jacklin Jan 2014

Review Of "Speaking The Earth's Languages: A Theory For Australian-Chilean Postcolonial Poetics', Michael R. Jacklin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Critical connections between Australian and Latin American literature are few and far between. Equally rare are readings which place Aboriginal literary production in Australia alongside that of Indigenous writing from Hispanic or Lusophone America. While a number of scholars have drawn comparisons between Australian Aboriginal writing and English-language Indigenous literature from North America, Indigenous writing from South and Central America has remained an almost terra incognita for Australian scholarship. Stuart Cooke’s study Speaking the Earth’s Languages: A Theory for Australian-Chilean Postcolonial Poetics reads Aboriginal poetic works by Paddy Roe, Butcher Joe Nangan and Lionel Fogarty along with poetry ...


Cinema Of Actuality: Japanese Avant-Garde Filmmaking In The Season Of Image Politics By Yuriko Furuhata (Review), Michael Leggett Jan 2014

Cinema Of Actuality: Japanese Avant-Garde Filmmaking In The Season Of Image Politics By Yuriko Furuhata (Review), Michael Leggett

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Japanese word eizo is central to an understanding of the significance of the interventions made into the cultural life of the nation by a relatively small grouping of artists and writers working between the 1950s and 1970s. Traditionally used as a phenomenological term in science and philosophy, the character connoted shadow or silhouette, later shifting to signify optical processes. Like the Greek term tehkne, creativeness and the tools used to achieve the outcome are relative, nuanced and complex.


Book Review: The Art Of Censorship In Postwar Japan. Studies Of The Weatherhead East Asian Institute. By Kirsten Cather, Rowena G. Ward Jan 2014

Book Review: The Art Of Censorship In Postwar Japan. Studies Of The Weatherhead East Asian Institute. By Kirsten Cather, Rowena G. Ward

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The practice of censorship is a divisive issue that is often justified on moral reasons rather than aesthetic or legalistic ones. It is perhaps because of the claims to morality rather than to the law that it is relatively rare for censorship (or more accurately in Japan’s case, obscenity) to be the subject of criminal trials. Yet, in Japan, from the occupation years through to the present day, there has been on average one high profile censorship trial per decade. In The Art of Censorship in Postwar Japan, Kirsten Cather considers seven such censorship trials held between the 1950s ...


Book Review: Fukushima, Leigh Dale Jan 2014

Book Review: Fukushima, Leigh Dale

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Three years ago today, Japan was hit by the strongest earthquake ever measured in that country – and Fukushima became an international by-word for disaster.

Now, as Japan tries to put its past behind it, Fukushima is back in the news as hundreds of evacuees prepare to return to their homes near the crippled nuclear power plant for the first time next month. But how do any of us begin to understand a disaster that could mean 50,000 people never see their homes again?

ABC journalist Mark Willacy’s Fukushima: Japan’s Tsunami and the Inside Story of the Nuclear ...


Walking And Mapping: Artists As Cartographers By Karen O'Rourke (Review), Michael Leggett Jan 2014

Walking And Mapping: Artists As Cartographers By Karen O'Rourke (Review), Michael Leggett

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In Walking and Mapping, both senses of the term "mapping" are caught up in a detailed hagiography of artists who, in one way or another, engage with movement through space, mainly as walkers. Records of the experience, by both the participants and the creators of the artworks, are mapped across both contemporary and historical time spectrums.


Book Review: David Grant, Jagged Seas: The New Zealand Seamen's Union, 1879-2003, Rowan Cahill Jan 2014

Book Review: David Grant, Jagged Seas: The New Zealand Seamen's Union, 1879-2003, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Jagged Seas is a commissioned history of the New Zealand Seamen’s Union (rebranded the New Zealand Seafarers’ Union following amalgamation with the Cooks’ and Stewards’ Union in 1990) from its beginnings in 1879 until it merged in 2002/03 with the New Zealand Waterfront Workers’ Union to form the Maritime Union of New Zealand. Author David Grant has a background in journalism and teaching, and a significant publication record in the research and writing of New Zealand labour movement, and dissident, anti-militarist, histories.


Book Review: Classified Woman By Sibel Edmonds, Brian Martin Jan 2013

Book Review: Classified Woman By Sibel Edmonds, Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

If you have any trust in the US justice system, beware! This book shows such deep-seated dysfunction and corruption that any idea of working within the system for change seems forlorn. There is, though, hope in the end.

Edmonds grew up in Iran and Turkey. Her father, a physician, was outspoken in support of justice and paid the penalty, being arrested and tortured under the regime of the Shah of Iran. Edmonds came to the US, thrilled to finally live in a country where freedom meant something - or so she thought.


Book Review: Desmond Manderson: Kangaroo Courts And The Rule Of Law. The Legacy Of Modernism. Routledge, Abingdon 2012., Luis Gomez Romero Jan 2013

Book Review: Desmond Manderson: Kangaroo Courts And The Rule Of Law. The Legacy Of Modernism. Routledge, Abingdon 2012., Luis Gomez Romero

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Kangaroo Courts represents the height of the recent work that Desmond Manderson has developed around the nexus between ‘law and literature’ and the rule of law. Manderson’s approach to this matter is unique in taking seriously both literary theory and the aesthetic aspects of literary texts—strange though it may seem, this is an authentic revolution in the field of law and literature. Manderson rightly observes that back to their very origins the discourses constructed around the conjunction of ‘law and literature’ have suffered from two structural weaknesses: first ‘a concentration on substance and plot’ and second ‘a salvific ...


Review Of Orgasmology By Annamarie Jagose, Guy R. Davidson Jan 2013

Review Of Orgasmology By Annamarie Jagose, Guy R. Davidson

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

As a scholarly object, orgasm, Annamarie Jagose notes, is -unruly- (XII). This book, however, amply demonstrates that orgasm-s unruliness can be conceptually and theoretically productive.


Grassroots Social Change: Lessons From An Anarchist Organizer - (Review Of Chris Crass, Towards Collective Liberation), Brian Martin Jan 2013

Grassroots Social Change: Lessons From An Anarchist Organizer - (Review Of Chris Crass, Towards Collective Liberation), Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Many progressives around the world look at the United States and are repelled by its extremes of wealth and poverty, enormous military, massive prison population, excessive gun violence, inhumane welfare policies, reckless environmental destruction, and aggressive and self-interested foreign policy. US trade policies have contributed to impoverishment in many countries; US troops are stationed in dozens of countries around the globe.

The US is the embodiment of a dangerous - even rogue - state, anomalous when compared to European social democracies or even other English-speaking countries. The US is the only wealthy industrialized country never to have had a significant communist, socialist ...


Review: 'Disobedience: The University As A Site Of Political Potential, Rowan Cahill Jan 2013

Review: 'Disobedience: The University As A Site Of Political Potential, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The radicalism of the 1960s and 1970s, and related student insurgency, is still largely uncharted territory when it comes to Australian history. There is a small body of scholarly research comprinsing theses, book chapter, journal articles, and an equally small number of relevant books. To my knowledge only one book, by Mick Armstrong (2001), attempts to survey and grapple with the entire period, its politics and complexities; in 114 pages, this is a brief but useful contribution.


Book Review: Wilful Blindness By Margaret Heffernan, Brian Martin Jan 2013

Book Review: Wilful Blindness By Margaret Heffernan, Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Whistleblowers see a problem and speak out about it. But what about the people who know there's a problem but say nothing? What about those who can't even see there's a problem?

If you're wondering about these questions, get a copy of Margaret Heffernan's book Willful Blindness. She surveys the evidence about how and why people turn away from unwelcome information, often to their own detriment.


Book Review: Nichole Georgeou. Neoliberalism Development And Aid Volunteering, Rowan Cahill Jan 2013

Book Review: Nichole Georgeou. Neoliberalism Development And Aid Volunteering, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

As Nichole Georgeou explains at the start of her book, the gestation of this study was her immersion and experiences in the field of aid volunteering in Japan and North Vietnam (pp.xv-xviii). This was during the early 1990s, when she was in her early twenties; they were experiences that left her asking huge moral, ethical, political questions about volunteering.


Methodological Lessons In Neurophenomenology: Review Of A Baseline Study And Recommendations For Research Approaches, Patricia Bockelman Morrow, Lauren Reinerman-Jones, Shaun Gallagher Jan 2013

Methodological Lessons In Neurophenomenology: Review Of A Baseline Study And Recommendations For Research Approaches, Patricia Bockelman Morrow, Lauren Reinerman-Jones, Shaun Gallagher

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Neurophenomenological (NP) methods integrate objective and subjective data in ways that retain the statistical power of established disciplines (like cognitive science) while embracing the value of first-person reports of experience. The present paper positions neurophenomenology as an approach that pulls from traditions of cognitive science but includes techniques that are challenging for cognitive science in some ways. A baseline study is reviewed for lessons learned, that is, the potential methodological improvements that will support advancements in understanding consciousness and cognition using neurophenomenology. These improvements, we suggest, include (1) addressing issues of interdisciplinarity by purposefully and systematically creating and maintaining shared ...


Review Of Richard N. Côté, In Search Of Gentle Death: The Fight For Your Right To Die With Dignity, Brian Martin Jan 2013

Review Of Richard N. Côté, In Search Of Gentle Death: The Fight For Your Right To Die With Dignity, Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Medical technology is making it possible to stave off death ever longer but, for some people with serious health problems, without much quality of life. Palliative care, also using ever more sophisticated medical interventions, can usually minimise pain and other symptoms. Nevertheless, some individuals experience severe ongoing suffering, whether from pain, breathlessness, nausea, indignity or lack of autonomy. They would rather die sooner than later.

For these reasons, euthanasia has become more significant as a social issue. Most church leaders are strongly opposed and so are most governments, though opinion polls show strong support, typically 70 percent or so in ...


Review Of Eveline Lubbers, Secret Manoeuvres In The Dark, Brian Martin Jan 2013

Review Of Eveline Lubbers, Secret Manoeuvres In The Dark, Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In the 1980s, the small anarchist group London Greenpeace - not related to Greenpeace International - produced a leaflet, "What's wrong with McDonald's?," about the poor nutritional value of McDonald's food, low wages of workers and environmental impacts of beef production, among other issues. McDonald's top management, being highly sensitive to criticism, hired two separate security firms to collect information on the group. Each of the firms hired individuals to infiltrate the activist group - which wasn't hard.

Because London Greenpeace had only a few members, the new recruits - the infiltrators - were welcomed; they provided energy for campaigning ...


Book Review: The Self-Made Map: Cartographic Writing In Early Modern France; And, The Face Of The Earth: Natural Landscapes, Science And Culture, Michael G. Leggett Jan 2013

Book Review: The Self-Made Map: Cartographic Writing In Early Modern France; And, The Face Of The Earth: Natural Landscapes, Science And Culture, Michael G. Leggett

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Politics, and (therefore) national and personal identity, are at the core of these two publications. The analysis of the remarkable period of European (and therefore world) history during the early modern period of the 15th and 16th centuries is discussed in the first book and provides the call for the kind of topographic descriptions compiled during the early part of the 21st Century, the topic of the second book. Then as now, proliferation of technology and political change provide the background to these accounts—overtly in the first, occluded in the second.


Review: "Konkretion" By Marion May Campbell, Catherine Cole Jan 2013

Review: "Konkretion" By Marion May Campbell, Catherine Cole

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Campbell’s novella, konkretion, follows an elderly ex-communist, Monique Piquet, through Paris, as she meets up with a former student who has published a book about German political activists, Ulrike Meinhof and Gudrun Ensslin, who were former and founding members of the Red Army Faction (RAF). The book offers a segueing and poetic re-examination of Meinhof, who died in suspicious circumstances in prison in 1976, and her fellow conspirators.


Book Review Of D. Cahill, L. Edwards And F. Stilwell (Eds.) (2012) ‘Neoliberalism: Beyond The Free Market, Scott Burrows Jan 2013

Book Review Of D. Cahill, L. Edwards And F. Stilwell (Eds.) (2012) ‘Neoliberalism: Beyond The Free Market, Scott Burrows

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Neoliberalism: Beyond the Free Market comes at a time of major economic crisis. This very timely book addresses the nature of neoliberalism as part of, and a consequence of, the global financial crisis. The book is structured in four parts each exploring neoliberalism from a range of inter-disciplinary perspectives. These include historical institutionalists, regulation theorists, Foucauldians, Marxists, Polanyi-inspired scholars and experts on the history of ideas. These approaches provide a useful contextual framework for understanding the concept of neoliberalism.