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Blog: Refugees A 'Political Whipping Boy', Anthony Ashbolt Jan 2013

Blog: Refugees A 'Political Whipping Boy', Anthony Ashbolt

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Kevin Rudd has taken up where he left off, but the vexing question of asylum seekers is yet to be answered by either party, writes Anthony Ashbolt. It is almost as if Kevin Rudd never stopped being Prime Minister. Such is the surreal nature of politics I referred to in the last piece. I noted also the Hollywood-like imagery the leadership battle evoked. Yet I did not mention the most glaring instance of this. Gillard marched into the caucus room that would decide her fate surrounded by a posse of loyal colleagues, only to be followed by the lone ranger ...


Among The Machines: Australian And Nz Artists, Su Ballard Jan 2013

Among The Machines: Australian And Nz Artists, Su Ballard

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

I was lead curator and invited scholar for AMONG THE MACHINES. The exhibition included 13 artists from New Zealand and Australia including major figures. The artists are: Ruth Buchanan, Bronwyn Holloway-Smith, Hayden Fowler, Douglas Bagnall, Fiona Pardington, Nathan Pohio, Hannah and Aaron Beehre, Daniel Crooks, Ronnie Van Hout, Susan Norrie, Jae Hoon Lee, Stella Brennan and Ann Shelton. The exhibition was advertised in E-flux, Art in Australia, Art News. I was interviewed on National Radio (4th July 2013), and it has received numerous favorable reviews.


New Australian Art Song For Low Voice, Lotte Latukefu Jan 2013

New Australian Art Song For Low Voice, Lotte Latukefu

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

World Premieres were given of the following songs:

Bitter Cold; The Ghost Road; Autumn Thoughts- composer- Larry Sitsky At the Triton's Call- composer- May Howlett


The Politics Of Gene Sharp, Brian Martin Jan 2013

The Politics Of Gene Sharp, Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Gene Sharp's contributions to the understanding of nonviolent action provide a useful lens for understanding developments in the field in recent decades. Sharp built on Gandhi's pioneering endeavours, but moved away from Gandhi by providing a pragmatic rationale for nonviolent action. Three important contributions by Sharp are his classification and cataloguing of methods of nonviolent action, his consent theory of power and his framework for understanding nonviolent campaigns. However, few academics have paid much attention to Sharp's work, and policy-makers have largely ignored it. In contrast, activists have taken up Sharp's ideas enthusiastically. Sharp is an ...


Three Easy Steps To Increase Uni Rankings, Brian Martin Jan 2013

Three Easy Steps To Increase Uni Rankings, Brian Martin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

University league tables are increasingly influential. Australian universities lucky enough to appear in the Jiao Tong, Times Higher Education or other world rankings can tout their positions as a way of attracting students and funds.


Maritime Security Issues In An Arc Of Instability And Opportunity, Walter S. Bateman, Quentin A. Hanich Jan 2013

Maritime Security Issues In An Arc Of Instability And Opportunity, Walter S. Bateman, Quentin A. Hanich

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Pacific Arc of islands and archipelagos to the north and east of Australia has been characterised both as an ‗arc of instability' and as an ‗arc of opportunity'. It is the region from or through which a threat to Australia could most easily be posed, as well as an area providing opportunities for Australia to work on common interests with the ultimate objective of a more secure and stable region. Maritime issues are prominent among these common interests. This article identifies these issues and their relevance to Australia's maritime strategy. It suggests measures Australia might take to exploit ...


Against Fascism And War: Pig Iron Bob And The Dalfram Dispute - Port Kembla 1938, Mike Donaldson, Nick Southall Jan 2013

Against Fascism And War: Pig Iron Bob And The Dalfram Dispute - Port Kembla 1938, Mike Donaldson, Nick Southall

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The 1938 Dalfram dispute involved workers at Port Kembla refusing to load pig iron on a ship bound for Japan and to be made use of in its agression against China and other countries in the region.


Aggression And Perceived National Face Threats In Mainland Chinese And Taiwanese, Dániel Z. Kadar, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang Jan 2013

Aggression And Perceived National Face Threats In Mainland Chinese And Taiwanese, Dániel Z. Kadar, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This study examines manifestations of verbal aggression in an intergroup context between Mainland Chinese and Taiwanese on computer-mediated communication (CMC) discussion boards. We examine the role of perceptions of national identity and face in occasioning instances of aggression in Sino-Taiwanese online interactions. It will be argued that there is a fundamental difference between Mainland Chinese and Taiwanese ways of displaying aggression when discussing cross-Strait issues. While the Taiwanese use abusive terms in order to dissociate themselves from the Mainland Chinese in online discourse, the latter tend to associate themselves with Taiwanese through terms that subsume Taiwanese claims to a national ...


Collaborative Creation Of Spoken Language Corpora, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang Jan 2013

Collaborative Creation Of Spoken Language Corpora, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Analysing authentic interactions at progressively greater levels of complexity is one means of promoting deeper engagement with pragmatic phenomena amongst L2 learners. However, effective analysis often requires a greater amount of data than learners can feasibly gather. It is proposed here that encouraging students to collaborate through the creation of a corpus of spoken interactions is one potentially effective way to help them engage with a much richer set of interactional data than they might normally encounter. Here we report on a corpus created through “crowdsourcing” the collection and transcription of recordings of spoken interactions, the Griffith Corpus of Spoken ...


The Sum Of All Our Fears: Transnational Corporations And The Crisis Of Convergence In Australia, Caroline Colton Jan 2013

The Sum Of All Our Fears: Transnational Corporations And The Crisis Of Convergence In Australia, Caroline Colton

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The article discusses the desire of the businesses to improve infrastructure construction by increase their infrastructure investment in superannuation funds and in the government of Australia. It highlights the privatisation of public assets and reduction of services for corporate profit optimisation in the government. It examines the impact of environmental law to the development of infrastructure such as power plants for economic development.


'His Grief Is The Plague': Poetry Of Loss And The Risk Of Losing One's Readers, Michael R. Jacklin Jan 2013

'His Grief Is The Plague': Poetry Of Loss And The Risk Of Losing One's Readers, Michael R. Jacklin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The book Lalomanu (2010), by Jorge Salavert, is a collection of poetry written in response to the death of the author’s six-year-old daughter Clea, one of the victims of the tsunami which swept ashore in Samoa, American Samoa and Tonga in September 2009. Lalomanu is a deeply moving account of grief and mourning, a book that its author knows will be too painful for some to read. As Salavert points out in his poems, most people he knows seem afraid of his grief; they are unable to respond to, or acknowledge, its intensity. And yet, in its expressions of ...


Landscapes Of Memory And Forgetting: Indigo And Shek Quey Lee, Kate Bagnall Jan 2013

Landscapes Of Memory And Forgetting: Indigo And Shek Quey Lee, Kate Bagnall

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In this illustrated essay I explore the intertwined histories of two rural settlements - Indigo in north-eastern Victoria, Australia, and Shek Quey Lee in Xinhui county, Guangdong, China - to consider how the rich story of Chinese migration and settlement in Australia has been remembered and forgotten, both in China and Australia. With the growth in interest in the history and heritage of the Chinese in Australia over the past twenty years, we can no longer say that it is a "forgotten" history, yet there are still challenges to researching and telling it. One of these is for Chinese Australian history to ...


The Petition Of Bah Fook Of Sofala, 1866, Kate Bagnall Jan 2013

The Petition Of Bah Fook Of Sofala, 1866, Kate Bagnall

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article introduces an unusual and significant historical document from the goldfields of colonial New South Wales – a petition to the Governor of New South Wales signed by more than 270 Chinese men, predominantly goldminers, living at Sofala on the Turon River goldfields in 1866. The petition concerned the unfair conviction of Bah Fook (百福), a fellow miner, for injuring a young white girl in a fight with her mother. The petition provides an interesting window into race relations on the Australian goldfields of the 1860s, highlighting the close and personal interactions of Chinese and white residents and the agency ...


Responsive Regulation And Application Of Grading Systems In The Food Safety Regulatory Regimes Of Developing Countries, Abu Noman Mohammad Atahar Ali Jan 2013

Responsive Regulation And Application Of Grading Systems In The Food Safety Regulatory Regimes Of Developing Countries, Abu Noman Mohammad Atahar Ali

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The traditional tit-for-tat philosophy in the food safety regulatory regime in most developing countries has been proven ineffective in most cases. Rather, starting with persuasion, advice, and then escalating to more severe punishments for the continuing non-compliance as suggested in the responsive regulation by Ayres and Braithwaite has been proved more effective in the food safety regulatory regime of some jurisdictions. Responsive regulation aims to increase responsibility among corporations. So, if a corporation shows responsibility, it should be rewarded, and if a corporation shows irresponsibility, it should be reprimanded (if necessary). There is no logic in seeing and treating every ...


Review Of 'Ashes In The Air' By Ali Alizadah, Michael R. Jacklin Jan 2013

Review Of 'Ashes In The Air' By Ali Alizadah, Michael R. Jacklin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Ali Alizadeh’s third book of poetry, Ashes in the Air, is a finely structured collection that speaks powerfully of transnational lives and identities. Global in their concerns, settings and perspectives, the poems in this collection move between the autobiographical and the polemical. Travel and migration are recurrent themes, as the autobiographic content traces an arch including a childhood in Tehran, adolescence on the Gold Coast, work as a teacher in Istanbul, Dubai and China, and time as a student and writer in Melbourne. The poems also trace the poet’s arguments and struggle with the larger forces shaping lives ...


Striving For Equity And Diversity, Cecilia Y. Leong-Salobir Jan 2013

Striving For Equity And Diversity, Cecilia Y. Leong-Salobir

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Earlier commemorative histories of The University of Western Australia focused on the development of physical buildings and the growth of staff and student numbers.l There were glowing reports of audits and assessments with nary a mention of equity or diversity. Today, universities face a variety of challenges in the equitable treatment of staff and students. No longer white, middle-class and mainly male, Australian universities have evolved into institutions of learning that are microcosms of modern Australian society. Empirical evidence suggests that the University has met many of the challenges of catering for the different needs of its staff and ...


Resisting The Evil Empire, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Resisting The Evil Empire, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Given it has been discussed so much, I am a little loath to add further to talk about The Daily Telegraph’s “Kick this mob out” cover. But it is such an instructive example.

As some of my colleagues have suggested such a display of swagger always has the potential to backfire.

There are now numerous signs of resistance, apart from discussion by politicians and media commentators, they include boycott attempts and a string of creative parodies.


Objective Journalism Cannot Hold Politicians To Account, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Objective Journalism Cannot Hold Politicians To Account, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The major story of day three of the election campaign was the coalition’s announcement of a 1.5% cut in the rate of company tax.

The way this story was covered by The Australian and The Guardian represent two completely different views of the role of journalism in an election campaign.

It was an unfolding story throughout the day as the ALP demanded to know how the cut would be paid for.

Treasurer, Chris Bowen rejected Tony Abbott’s claim that the cut could be paid for by previously announced spending cuts as: “magic pudding economics” and double-counting. Although ...


Apocalypse Now: Why The Movies Want The World To End Every Year, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Apocalypse Now: Why The Movies Want The World To End Every Year, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The last few years have begun with predictions of the Apocalypse hanging over us.

The Rapture was supposed to come in 2011, with US preacher Harold Camping first saying it would come in May then readjusting his sights to October. Last year, of course, brought us predictions of the Mayan Apocalypse, which passed with lots of parties but no lasting fireworks.

With solar activity expected to reach a cyclical peak in 2013, this year was shaping up as another big year for apocalyptic fears, however NASA have recently downgraded their predictions for solar storms. So does this mean that we ...


The Messianic Absolutism Of Zero Dark Thirty, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

The Messianic Absolutism Of Zero Dark Thirty, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

A lot has been written about Zero Dark Thirty’s torture narrative.

Alex Gibney, whose Taxi to the Dark Side traced the abuses of the Bush torture system, gives one of the best accounts. Having seen the film I agree with two things critics have been saying.

First, this is a technically superb piece of cinema. Director Katheryn Bigelow’s attention to detail and many intelligent choices makes her treatment of torture even more disappointing.

Second, the story arc clearly implies that torture tactics were central rather than incidental in gathering the information that led to the capture of Osama ...


Pm Surprises With September Election Announcement, Charis Palmer, Geoffrey Robinson, Gregory Melleuish Jan 2013

Pm Surprises With September Election Announcement, Charis Palmer, Geoffrey Robinson, Gregory Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Prime Minister Julia Gillard has announced the date of the 2013 election, with Australia to go to the ballot box on September 14.

Ms Gillard today told the National Press Club the move would give certainty, and she hoped it would create an environment in which the nation’s eyes were more easily focused on policies and not “petty politics”.


Out Of The Big Smoke: Crime Fiction In 2013, Sue Turnbull Jan 2013

Out Of The Big Smoke: Crime Fiction In 2013, Sue Turnbull

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Oddly enough and against trend – all those Scandinavian crime novels bobbing up in translation – I spent most of the year travelling Australia in crime fiction.

From East (Peter Cotton’s Canberra in Dead Cat Bounce) to West (Alan Carter’s Perth in Getting Warmer) with many intriguing side trips in between; a trip to Thailand with Angela Savage (The Dying Beach), and a retreat to rural South East New South Wales with Stuart Littlemore (Harry Curry: Rats and Mice).

Reviewing the route taken simply confirms my suspicion that Australian crime fiction has become emphatically “regional”. The city is no longer ...


Rudd Vs Abbott People's Forum: Experts Respond, Tom Clark, David Holmes, David Maguire, Denis Muller, Fabrizio Carmignani, Joseph Fernandez, Marcus O'Donnell, Sean Rintel Jan 2013

Rudd Vs Abbott People's Forum: Experts Respond, Tom Clark, David Holmes, David Maguire, Denis Muller, Fabrizio Carmignani, Joseph Fernandez, Marcus O'Donnell, Sean Rintel

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott have met in a “town hall” style leaders' debate at the Broncos Leagues Club in Brisbane.

Abbott and Rudd took questions from an audience of 100 undecided voters on issues from public service cuts, industrial relations, the environment and asylum seekers.

In his closing statements, Rudd pointed to Queensland state premier Campbell Newman breaking his promise not to cut public service jobs, as a harbinger of what would face Australia if an Abbott government were elected.


(Wo)Man With Mirror, Lucas M. Ihlein, Louise Curham Jan 2013

(Wo)Man With Mirror, Lucas M. Ihlein, Louise Curham

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Teaching and Learning are Louise Curham & Lucas Ihlein. TLC evolved from the Sydney Moving Image Coalition - a filmmakers and film lovers group with a specific focus on Super 8, Curham works in film performance, installation and experimental film. Her key interest is the experience of deteriorating and ephemeral film images. Ihlein is an artist who works with social relations and communication as the primary media of his creative practice. His work manifests as blogs, participatory performances, pedagogical projects, experimental film and video, re-enactments, gallery installations, lithographic prints and drawings.


Unprecedented Factory Fire Of Tazreen Fashions In Bangladesh: Revisiting Bangladeshi Labour Laws In Light Of Their Equivalents In Australia, S M. Solaiman Jan 2013

Unprecedented Factory Fire Of Tazreen Fashions In Bangladesh: Revisiting Bangladeshi Labour Laws In Light Of Their Equivalents In Australia, S M. Solaiman

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Right to life is a core human right, but workers' lives seem to be dreadfully cheap in Bangladesh. This is so because the government appears to be complacent by offering a small amount of money to the families of victims of fires at garment factories and collapses of factory buildings. Previously, at least 1,000 workers have been killed in garment factories alone in Bangladesh from 1990 to 2012, ironically, all went unpunished. Recently, the devastating fire at Tazreen Fashions Ltd. which killed 112 in November 2012 and, just a few months apart, the horrifying collapse of Rana Plaza which ...