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Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

2013

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Ethical And Legal Issues In Teaching About Japanese Popular Culture To Undergraduate Students In Australia, Mark J. Mclelland Jan 2013

Ethical And Legal Issues In Teaching About Japanese Popular Culture To Undergraduate Students In Australia, Mark J. Mclelland

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Interest in Japanese popular culture, particularly young people’s engagement with manga and animation, is widely acknowledged to be a driving factor in recruitment to undergraduate Japanese language and studies courses at universities around the world. Contemporary students live in a convergent media culture where they often occupy multiple roles as fans, students and ‘produsers’ of Japanese cultural content. Students’ easy access to and manipulation of Japanese cultural content through sites that offer ‘scanlation’ and ‘fansubbing’ services as well as sites that enable the production and dissemination of dōjin works raise a number of ethical and legal issues, not least ...


Cultural Politics: Who Cares About The Arts?, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Cultural Politics: Who Cares About The Arts?, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The fact that the arts haven’t starred in this election and its media coverage is perhaps no big surprise. But it sends a disturbing signal about the place of the arts in our public discourse.

When Arts Minister Tony Burke and shadow arts spokesperson George Brandis addressed an arts forum in Western Sydney last week it was one of the few moments when the arts got a focus in media reporting, but even then coverage was scant. A single story appeared in the Fairfax papers, The Australian followed up their debate story with a Brandis profile and this week ...


Fictionalism About Folk Psychology, Daniel Hutto Jan 2013

Fictionalism About Folk Psychology, Daniel Hutto

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper argues that fictionalism about folk psychology, FaF, is ill motivated in any domain. It is argued that there is no advantage in trying to vindicate folk psychology by treating the constructs of classical cognitivism--namely, subpersonal mental representations--as useful fictions in contrast to serious scientific posits or as serving as the basis for philosophical explanations. Both scientific and philosophical considerations point to the conclusion that subpersonal representations of the sort that classical cognitivism posits should be eliminated, not preserved, by our best science of mind. Yet there is no need to assume that folk psychological explanations are subpersonally based ...


Introduction: Ways Of Knowing About Human Rights In Asia, Vera C. Mackie Jan 2013

Introduction: Ways Of Knowing About Human Rights In Asia, Vera C. Mackie

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted on 10 December 1948 by the United Nations General Assembly. We have thus seen 65 years of the international project of addressing human rights issues at a global level through the United Nations and associated organisations. Human rights occupy a paradoxical place in international politics. Human rights treaties address the most intimate issues of personal freedom, autonomy and self-determination, but the institutions developed for the promotion of human rights operate at a global level seemingly distanced from this intimate and individual scale. In human rights advocacy there is thus constant mediation ...


Dolphin-Friendly Tuna: We're Worrying About The Wrong Species, Quentin Hanich Jan 2013

Dolphin-Friendly Tuna: We're Worrying About The Wrong Species, Quentin Hanich

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Seafood is increasingly marketed as the clean, healthy choice for consumers – full of good oils and proteins and low in fat – with canned tuna a favourite cheap source of healthy protein. But science provides ever-worsening reports on the state of many fisheries, and their effect on marine ecosystems.

As international conservation negotiations flounder, consumers and industry are increasingly relying on eco-labelling to tell which seafood products come from sustainably managed fisheries. But there’s more to tuna than “dolphin-friendly”: what do these labels really tell us?