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Full-Text Articles in Law

Cultural Paradigms In Property Institutions, Taisu Zhang Jan 2016

Cultural Paradigms In Property Institutions, Taisu Zhang

Faculty Scholarship

Do “cultural factors” substantively influence the creation and evolution of property institutions? For the past several decades, few legal scholars have answered affirmatively. Those inclined towards a law and economics methodology tend to see property institutions as the outcome of self-interested and utilitarian bargaining, and therefore often question the analytical usefulness of “culture.” The major emerging alternative, a progressive literature that emphasizes the social embeddedness of property institutions and individuals, is theoretically more accommodating of cultural analysis but has done very little of it.

This Article develops a “cultural” theory of how property institutions are created and demonstrates that such ...


On The Ninth Circuit's New Definition Of Piracy: Japanese Whalers V. The Sea Shepherd-Who Are The Real "Pirates" (I.E. Plunderers)?, Barry H. Dubner, Claudia Pastorius Jan 2014

On The Ninth Circuit's New Definition Of Piracy: Japanese Whalers V. The Sea Shepherd-Who Are The Real "Pirates" (I.E. Plunderers)?, Barry H. Dubner, Claudia Pastorius

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Prosecutors And Bargaining In Weak Cases: A Comparative View, Jenia I. Turner Jan 2012

Prosecutors And Bargaining In Weak Cases: A Comparative View, Jenia I. Turner

Faculty Scholarship

One of the most controversial uses of prosecutorial discretion in plea bargaining concerns cases involving weak evidence of guilt. When a prosecutor bargains about the charges or even the facts in a case with weak evidence, at least three problems may arise. First, if the charge bargain is generous, it may coerce an innocent defendant to plead guilty. Second, such a bargain may let a guilty defendant off too easily, thus disserving the public and victim’s interests. Third, if the parties bargain about the facts, the result may distort the truth of the case.

In this book chapter, I ...


Protection Of Famous Trademarks In Japan And The United States, Kenneth L. Port Jan 1997

Protection Of Famous Trademarks In Japan And The United States, Kenneth L. Port

Faculty Scholarship

The concepts of trademark jurisprudence in Japan and the United States differ drastically. This difference is apparent in many aspects of trademark protection in both countries and is most evident in the treatment of famous marks. Although Japan and the United States share elements of trademark law that cause some observers to claim that Japan is legally the fifty-first State, the conceptual differences at the foundation of trademark law in each country are so significant that such a claim seems inaccurate and misleading.


The Japanese International Law 'Revolution': International Human Rights Law And Its Impact In Japan, Kenneth L. Port Jan 1991

The Japanese International Law 'Revolution': International Human Rights Law And Its Impact In Japan, Kenneth L. Port

Faculty Scholarship

Some observers have argued that because of a lack of enforcement powers, international law has relatively little impact on the conduct of nations and, in fact, may not be "law" at all. Others have inquired whether legal norms which underlie international human rights law have any influence on the domestic law of signatory nations. This article argues that international law can profoundly influence the development of the domestic laws of nations regardless of the lack of coercive enforcement powers. This point becomes clear through a consideration of Japan's experience in adopting and internalizing international law norms.