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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law

Book Review: Slave Law In The Americas, David S. Bogen Jan 1991

Book Review: Slave Law In The Americas, David S. Bogen

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Privacy Obstacle Course: Hurding Barriers To Transnational Financial Services, Joel R. Reidenberg Jan 1991

The Privacy Obstacle Course: Hurding Barriers To Transnational Financial Services, Joel R. Reidenberg

Faculty Scholarship

This article addresses the challenge to transnational financial services resulting from national regulation of information processing. National laws around the world seek to define fair information practices for the private sector and contain prohibitions on data transfers to foreign destinations that lack sufficient privacy protection. The effect of these laws for the financial services industry is significant because financial services depend on personal information. The article argues that the international attempts to harmonize information practice standards and the national efforts to regulate information processing encourage divergence of national standards for financial services. It argues that regulatory flexibility and customization is ...


The Japanese International Law 'Revolution': International Human Rights Law And Its Impact In Japan, Kenneth L. Port Jan 1991

The Japanese International Law 'Revolution': International Human Rights Law And Its Impact In Japan, Kenneth L. Port

Faculty Scholarship

Some observers have argued that because of a lack of enforcement powers, international law has relatively little impact on the conduct of nations and, in fact, may not be "law" at all. Others have inquired whether legal norms which underlie international human rights law have any influence on the domestic law of signatory nations. This article argues that international law can profoundly influence the development of the domestic laws of nations regardless of the lack of coercive enforcement powers. This point becomes clear through a consideration of Japan's experience in adopting and internalizing international law norms.