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Boston College Law Review

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Non-Enforcement Takings, Timothy M. Mulvaney Jan 2018

Non-Enforcement Takings, Timothy M. Mulvaney

Boston College Law Review

The non-enforcement of existing property laws is not logically separable from the issue of unfair and unjust state deprivations of property rights at which the Constitution’s Takings Clause takes aim. This Article suggests, therefore, that takings law should police allocations resulting from non-enforcement decisions on the same “fairness and justice” grounds that it polices allocations resulting from decisions to enact and enforce new regulations. Rejecting the extant majority position that state decisions not to enforce existing property laws are categorically immune from takings liability is not to advocate that persons impacted by such decisions should be automatically or even ...


The Price Tag On Designer Babies: Market Share Liability, Boston College Law Review Staff Jan 2018

The Price Tag On Designer Babies: Market Share Liability, Boston College Law Review Staff

Boston College Law Review

The prospect of genetically modifying humans has loomed over the public for decades. Now, science fiction is becoming reality. New technology and expanding research are positioned to make genetic alteration a routine, pre-conception appointment. For several years, China has been experimenting with germline editing on non-viable human embryos. In April 2016, the UK also approved a group of scientists to begin similar research. In the United States, genetic engineering is a multibillion-dollar industry. Although ethical debates over human genetic modification have checked the industry, the potential for clinical trials has become a reality as companies race to dominate the technology ...


The Architecture Of Contract Innovation, Matthew Jennejohn Jan 2018

The Architecture Of Contract Innovation, Matthew Jennejohn

Boston College Law Review

Contract law and the formal models of contract economics assume that agreements are fully customized. On the other hand, recent legal research highlights the role standardized terms play in contract design. Those lines of research overlook an important class of contracts between those extremes. Many contracts, such as the merger agreements studied here, are complex combinations of customized and standardized terms, and thereby achieve economies of both scale and scope. Such contracts are “mass customized,” to borrow a term from engineering research. This Article introduces a theoretical framework for understanding how mass customization of such complex agreements is achieved. It ...


The Case For Tipping And Unrestricted Tip-Pooling: Promoting Intrafirm Cooperation, Samuel Estreicher, Jonathan Remy Nash Jan 2018

The Case For Tipping And Unrestricted Tip-Pooling: Promoting Intrafirm Cooperation, Samuel Estreicher, Jonathan Remy Nash

Boston College Law Review

No law in the United States requires or prohibits customers from tipping employees for satisfactory service. Tip income is typically regarded as belonging to employees and may not be appropriated by the employer. Tipping is a widespread phenomenon in certain settings–restaurants, hotels, and gambling casinos. It is a form of performance-based variable compensation that is generally not found elsewhere in this country, where employees generally prefer fixed incomes over a defined period. As a general matter, our laws allow tipping but regulate the sharing of tip income among employees. In the restaurant setting, tip-pooling occurs when tips received by ...


Remaking Making: Integrating Self-Replicating Technologies With The Exhaustion Doctrine, Adanna Uwazurike Jan 2018

Remaking Making: Integrating Self-Replicating Technologies With The Exhaustion Doctrine, Adanna Uwazurike

Boston College Law Review

Self-replicating technologies such as genetically modified organisms have unquestionably improved the farming industry. In order to ensure continued innovation in this area, the law has increasingly established protections for this technology. Although the exhaustion doctrine serves as a limit to a patent holder’s rights, the application of the current patent infringement regime may be over-inclusive as self-replicating technologies continue to advance. This Note identifies Bowman v. Monsanto as a recent example of how self-replicating patented products could lead to blanket infringement liability, including for innocent infringers. This Note recommends that the definition of “making” be redefined to include only ...


Playing A Man Down: Professional Sports And Stadium Finance—How Leagues And Franchises Extract Favorable Terms From American Cities, Nicholas Baker Jan 2018

Playing A Man Down: Professional Sports And Stadium Finance—How Leagues And Franchises Extract Favorable Terms From American Cities, Nicholas Baker

Boston College Law Review

In an era of unprecedented profitability, expansion, and popularity of American professional sports leagues, it seems outrageous that cities and municipalities across the United States would continue to subsidize the funding of new stadiums for wealthy sports franchises. Yet despite the economic obstacles facing many of these cities and municipalities, the gratuitous public funding of stadiums across the United States persists. This reality stems from the extraordinary bargaining power that professional sports franchises maintain over the cities in which they are located. Indeed, threating to relocate a franchise brings forth a litany of cities that are ready and willing to ...


The Federal Equity Power, Michael T. Morley Jan 2018

The Federal Equity Power, Michael T. Morley

Boston College Law Review

Throughout the first century and a half of our nation’s history, federal courts treated equity as a type of general law. They applied a uniform, freestanding body of principles derived from the English Court of Chancery to all equitable issues that came before them, regardless of whether a case arose under federal or state law. In 1945, in Guaranty Trust Co. v. York, the United States Supreme Court held that, notwithstanding the changes wrought by the Erie Doctrine, federal courts may continue to rely on these traditional principles of equity to determine the availability of equitable relief, such as ...


Organic Corporate Governance, Robert C. Bird, Stephen Kim Park Jan 2018

Organic Corporate Governance, Robert C. Bird, Stephen Kim Park

Boston College Law Review

A publicly-held corporation maintains a system of governance through separation of ownership and control of the firm. Under this framework, corporations attract capital and repatriate profits to their shareholders under the authority vested in the board of directors. However, significant evidence exists that Chief Executive Officers (“CEOs”) are commonly driven by self-interest, boards often indulge CEOs, and shareholders find it difficult to monitor management. Many recent reforms have sought to improve corporate governance through regulatory interventions that empower shareholders. This Article identifies the limitations of this approach and advances a new model that looks within the “black box” of the ...


“Warning: Use May Result In Cruel And Unusual Punishment”: How Administrative Law And Adequate Warning Labels Can Bring About The Demise Of Lethal Injection, Julia Eaton Jan 2018

“Warning: Use May Result In Cruel And Unusual Punishment”: How Administrative Law And Adequate Warning Labels Can Bring About The Demise Of Lethal Injection, Julia Eaton

Boston College Law Review

Lethal injection, although currently the preferred method of execution in the United States, causes more botched executions than any other method. Despite recorded instances of extreme pain and suffering, the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) does not regulate lethal injection drugs for safety and effectiveness because their use occurs “off-label” and thus outside of the purview of the FDA’s regulatory scope. Challengers to the FDA’s lack of regulation have thus far been unsuccessful in the courts due to the deference that the courts give to agency decisions. This Note discusses the ways in which administrative law ...


Corporate Tax Avoidance And Honoring The Fiduciary Duties Owed To The Corporation And Its Stockholders, Eric C. Chaffee, Karie Davis-Nozemack Nov 2017

Corporate Tax Avoidance And Honoring The Fiduciary Duties Owed To The Corporation And Its Stockholders, Eric C. Chaffee, Karie Davis-Nozemack

Boston College Law Review

Corporate tax avoidance is a pressing issue of both national and international concern. Corporations usually claim that they are legally required to engage in aggressive tax strategies. But this Article proves that claim is incorrect when based upon the fiduciary duties owed to the corporation and its stockholders. Directors and other corporate managers often look to the classic case of Dodge v. Ford, which is ubiquitous in corporate law from the boardroom to the courtroom, as a North Star that guides them toward and defines their fiduciary duties to the corporation and its stockholders. In Dodge, the court held, “A ...


The Public Interest In Corporate Settlements, Brandon L. Garrett Nov 2017

The Public Interest In Corporate Settlements, Brandon L. Garrett

Boston College Law Review

Corporate settlements are proliferating in form and function. They include consent decrees, corporate integrity agreements, deferred prosecution agreements, non-prosecution agreements, leniency agreements, and plea bargains. Enforcers at the federal and state level enter an array of administrative, civil, and criminal resolutions of enforcement actions against companies. The reach of these settlements is global, and corporate fines have reached new records, with penalties in the hundreds of billions of dollars affecting entire industries and economies. These settlements have not been studied together as a subject, perhaps because they span very different fields, from antitrust to banking, environmental law, health law, and ...


The Justice Against Sponsors Of Terrorism Act: An Infringement On Executive Power, Dan Cahill Nov 2017

The Justice Against Sponsors Of Terrorism Act: An Infringement On Executive Power, Dan Cahill

Boston College Law Review

In the more than sixteen years since September 11, 2001, the United States has resolved, through policy at home and abroad, to vindicate the heroes and victims of that attack. From the creation of the Department of Homeland Security, to the raid that resulted in the death of Osama Bin Laden, the shockwaves of 9/11 have reverberated through America’s domestic and foreign policy ever since. In the only veto override of the Obama presidency, the 114th U.S. Congress brought the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (“JASTA”) into force, intending to provide U.S. citizens with a ...


Changing Welfare As We Know It, Again: Reforming The Welfare Reform Act To Provide All Drug Felons Access To Food Stamps, Meghan Looney Paresky Nov 2017

Changing Welfare As We Know It, Again: Reforming The Welfare Reform Act To Provide All Drug Felons Access To Food Stamps, Meghan Looney Paresky

Boston College Law Review

Approximately half a million Americans are currently incarcerated for drug convictions at the state and federal level. President Clinton’s 1996 enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (“PRWORA”) affects this enormous class of individuals by including a provision that places a lifetime ban on access to welfare benefits, including food stamps, for individuals who have been convicted of a drug felony. Although there is an option within PRWORA for states to modify or opt out of the provision, six states and territories still enforce the full lifetime ban, and most states have some form of the ...


Stopping Illegal Fishing And Seafood Fraudsters: The Presidential Task Force’S Plan On Tackling Iuu Fishing And Seafood Fraud, Thomas Lampert Nov 2017

Stopping Illegal Fishing And Seafood Fraudsters: The Presidential Task Force’S Plan On Tackling Iuu Fishing And Seafood Fraud, Thomas Lampert

Boston College Law Review

Worldwide seafood markets have a major problem: too often, the seafood listed on the menu is of a different species than what is served. This phenomenon—known as seafood fraud—and the related practice of illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing threatens the sustainability of our oceans, poses health risks to consumers, and forces consumers to pay a high price for a cheap product. Previous domestic and international efforts to combat this issue have failed for a number of reasons, including the international nature of the industry, a byzantine supply chain, the large number of entities responsible for combatting the issue ...


A Pantomime Of Privacy: Terrorism And Investigative Powers In German Constitutional Law, Russell A. Miller Nov 2017

A Pantomime Of Privacy: Terrorism And Investigative Powers In German Constitutional Law, Russell A. Miller

Boston College Law Review

Germany is widely regarded as a global model for the privacy protection its constitutional regime offers against intrusive intelligence-gathering and law enforcement surveillance. There is some basis for Germany’s privacy “exceptionalism,” especially as the text of the German Constitution (“Basic Law”) provides explicit textual protections that America’s Eighteenth Century Constitution lacks. The German Federal Constitutional Court has added to those doctrines with an expansive interpretation of the more general rights to dignity (Basic Law Article 1) and the free development of one’s personality (Basic Law Article 2). This jurisprudence includes constitutional liberty guarantees such as the absolute ...


Saving Lives, Shalini Bhargava Ray Sep 2017

Saving Lives, Shalini Bhargava Ray

Boston College Law Review

When Alan Kurdi, a Syrian toddler, drowned in the Mediterranean while fleeing civil war in his home country, the world’s attention turned to the Syrian refugee crisis. Offers to transport and house refugees surged. Private boats set out on the Mediterranean Sea to rescue refugees dying in the water. A billionaire offered to purchase an island on which the refugees could live out their lives. This Article analyzes private humanitarian aid to asylum seekers, a subset of migrants whose claims for refugee protection have not yet been filed or adjudicated, and who typically travel without authorization. This Article determines ...


From Student-Athletes To Employee-Athletes: Why A "Pay For Play" Model Of College Sports Would Not Necessarily Make Educational Scholarships Taxable, Marc Edelman Sep 2017

From Student-Athletes To Employee-Athletes: Why A "Pay For Play" Model Of College Sports Would Not Necessarily Make Educational Scholarships Taxable, Marc Edelman

Boston College Law Review

In recent years, numerous commentators have called for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”) to relax its rules prohibiting athlete pay. This movement to allow athletes to share in the revenues of college sports arises from the belief that college athletes sacrifice too much time, personal autonomy, and physical health to justify their lack of pay. It further criticizes the NCAA’s “no pay” rules for keeping the revenues derived from college sports “in the hands of a select few administrators, athletic directors, and coaches.” Nevertheless, opponents of “pay for play” contend that several problems will emerge from lifting the ...


Discriminating Against The Dead: How To Protect Muslim Cemeteries From Exclusionary Land Use Mechanisms, Christopher Cataldo Sep 2017

Discriminating Against The Dead: How To Protect Muslim Cemeteries From Exclusionary Land Use Mechanisms, Christopher Cataldo

Boston College Law Review

U.S. Muslims face virulent, entrenched opposition in constructing the cemeteries that allow them to bury their dead according to Islamic law and tradition. Despite state and federal laws designed to guard against acts of religious discrimination such as the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (“RLUIPA”), local governments impede Muslim cemetery constructions via zoning ordinances and adjudicative permit denials. As a result of these efforts, Muslims experience unfair discrimination as local land control bodies unduly delay or block their attempts to build cemeteries. To better protect Muslims’ rights in land use disputes, this Note advocates for amendments ...


The Symmetry Principle, Bradley A. Areheart Sep 2017

The Symmetry Principle, Bradley A. Areheart

Boston College Law Review

Title VII provides symmetrical protection against discrimination in that both blacks and whites, and men and women may avail themselves of the law’s protections. In contrast, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act operates asymmetrically, shielding workers over the age of forty from discrimination yet offering no reciprocal protection for younger workers. Why do some antidiscrimination laws protect symmetrically while others do not? More importantly, why does this design choice matter? These are questions that scholars, courts, and legislators have generally ignored. This Article proceeds in two parts. First, it identifies symmetry as an important, yet frequently overlooked, way in ...


Employer Liability For Non-Employee Discrimination, Dallan F. Flake Sep 2017

Employer Liability For Non-Employee Discrimination, Dallan F. Flake

Boston College Law Review

Discrimination against employees by customers, vendors, and other third parties is a serious issue that will likely become even more pressing in the near future. Increased workplace interactions between employees and non-employees, coupled with the societal shift toward subtle, covert, and sometimes even unconscious discrimination, mean non-employee discrimination is likely to become more pervasive—even as it becomes harder to detect. As this perfect storm brews, it is worth considering how judicial treatment of non-employee discrimination can be improved. I argue that one of the most important changes needed is for the law to cease treating discrimination by non-employees and ...


The Threads Of Justice: Economic Liberalization And The Secondhand Clothing Trade Between The U.S. And Haiti, Kelsey Gasseling Sep 2017

The Threads Of Justice: Economic Liberalization And The Secondhand Clothing Trade Between The U.S. And Haiti, Kelsey Gasseling

Boston College Law Review

After World War II, as economic liberalization spread across the globe through international negotiations like the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, so too did used clothing. Though many proponents of the trade laud its capacity to create employment opportunities in less developed countries, critics suggest it has a more insidious deleterious effect on local industry. To this day, however, little research has been done regarding the symbiotic relationship between trade liberalization and the secondhand clothing industry. Some economic scholars suggest that current approaches to liberal trade—unilateral trade preferences particularly—stymy, instead of stimulate sustainable and just economic growth ...


Understanding The Public Trust Doctrine Through Due Process, Michael O'Loughlin Sep 2017

Understanding The Public Trust Doctrine Through Due Process, Michael O'Loughlin

Boston College Law Review

The public trust doctrine (“PTD”) could be a powerful tool for environmental lawyers. It protects the public’s right to use and access resources by placing them in trust with the state and guiding the sovereign’s discretion in their management. Although it lies inherent in sovereignty, the law scatters it across constitutional, statutory, and common law sources, hurting its effectiveness. Understanding the public’s beneficiary interest in this public trust as a due process protected property right would help resolve these failings by placing it under the umbrella of the U.S. Constitution’s guarantee against arbitrary deprivations of ...


Sharing Economy Inequality: How The Adoption Of Class Action Waivers In The Sharing Economy Presents A Threat To Racial Discrimination Claims, Caitlin Toto Sep 2017

Sharing Economy Inequality: How The Adoption Of Class Action Waivers In The Sharing Economy Presents A Threat To Racial Discrimination Claims, Caitlin Toto

Boston College Law Review

In recent years, the sharing economy has pervaded the life of the consumer, challenging the regulatory and business status quo. Despite the pluralistic messages of many sharing economy companies, racial discrimination is a growing problem on peer-to-peer networks such as Uber and Airbnb. Victims of discrimination, however, have encountered an even greater opponent: class action waivers in arbitration agreements, which are omnipresent in sharing economy company contracts. Due to the inherent tie between class action and civil rights, racial discrimination claims in the sharing economy are held hostage by individual arbitration agreements. This Note argues that without action by Congress ...


Budding Conflicts: Marijuana's Impact On Unsettled Questions Of Tribal-State Relations, Katherine J. Florey Jun 2017

Budding Conflicts: Marijuana's Impact On Unsettled Questions Of Tribal-State Relations, Katherine J. Florey

Boston College Law Review

In the wake of a December 2014 decision by the Department of Justice to deprioritize enforcement of federal marijuana laws against tribes as well as states, many tribes have reevaluated their policies toward marijuana. Tribal attitudes toward marijuana are diverse; some tribes regard marijuana as a public health menace, whereas others see it as a source of economic opportunity. Where tribal policies are significantly more or less restrictive than those of the surrounding state, tribal-state relations have often suffered friction. The problem is particularly acute given the jurisdictional uncertainty that characterizes Indian country and the absence of any equivalent to ...


Marijuana, State Extraterritoriality, And Congress, Mark D. Rosen Jun 2017

Marijuana, State Extraterritoriality, And Congress, Mark D. Rosen

Boston College Law Review

The Trump administration inherits the Obama administration’s policy of under-enforcing federal marijuana laws and a nation with a patchwork of divergent state laws. Although allowing diversity and experimentation, such divergence may impose spillover costs to some states. Some states may attempt to address these costs by exercising extraterritorial regulatory powers on their citizens. Although it is unclear and a matter of dispute whether and to what extent states have such extraterritorial authority, this Article shows that it is certain that Congress has power to set the bounds of state extraterritorial regulation, subject to only limited constitutional restraints. The Article ...


A General Theory Of Preemption: With Comments On State Decriminalization Of Marijuana, Lea Brilmayer Jun 2017

A General Theory Of Preemption: With Comments On State Decriminalization Of Marijuana, Lea Brilmayer

Boston College Law Review

Marijuana decriminalization is a hotly debated topic, which has nonetheless seen popular support in recent years. Current federal law (the Controlled Substances Act) conflicts with many state decriminalization efforts, raising the obvious question of federal preemption. The Supreme Court has failed to provide a clear answer on how much federal law preempts state marijuana decriminalization laws. This Article identifies the foundational principles of vertical and horizontal preemption, as well as various unanswered questions regarding these doctrines. It then applies these questions to marijuana decriminalization. Ultimately, it argues that there is a weak case for vertical or horizontal preemption in the ...


One Toke Too Far: The Demise Of The Dormant Commerce Clause's Extraterritoriality Doctrine Threatens The Marijuana-Legalization Experiment, Chad Deveaux Jun 2017

One Toke Too Far: The Demise Of The Dormant Commerce Clause's Extraterritoriality Doctrine Threatens The Marijuana-Legalization Experiment, Chad Deveaux

Boston College Law Review

This Article argues that the pending feuds between neighboring states over marijuana decriminalization demonstrate the need for a strict doctrine limiting a state’s regulatory authority to its own borders. Precedent recognizes that the dormant Commerce Clause (“DCC”) “precludes the application of a state statute to commerce that takes place wholly outside the State’s borders, whether or not the commerce has effects within the State.” This prohibition protects “the autonomy of the individual States within their respective spheres” by dictating that “[n]o state has the authority to tell other polities what laws they must enact or how affairs ...


Introduction: Marijuana Laws And Federalism, Erwin Chemerinsky Jun 2017

Introduction: Marijuana Laws And Federalism, Erwin Chemerinsky

Boston College Law Review

No abstract provided.


Marijuana Legalization And Nosy Neighbor States, Alex Kreit Jun 2017

Marijuana Legalization And Nosy Neighbor States, Alex Kreit

Boston College Law Review

As more states proceed with marijuana legalization laws, questions have arisen about how to accommodate those states that wish to retain prohibition. For instance, in 2014, Oklahoma and Nebraska unsuccessfully sued Colorado based on the spillover effects that Colorado’s marijuana legalization law had on its neighboring states. This article asserts that there are several reasons why state marijuana legalization laws are unlikely to have a large effect on neighboring states. First, marijuana is not a previously unobtainable good being introduced into the stream of commerce, as it is already available through the black market inexpensively. Second, legalization laws have ...


Reefer Madness: How Non-Legalizing States Can Revamp Dram Shop Laws To Protect Themselves From Marijuana Spillover From Their Legalizing Neighbors, Jessica Berch Jun 2017

Reefer Madness: How Non-Legalizing States Can Revamp Dram Shop Laws To Protect Themselves From Marijuana Spillover From Their Legalizing Neighbors, Jessica Berch

Boston College Law Review

Reefer madness is sweeping the nation. Despite a federal ban on marijuana, states have begun to legalize medical and, increasingly, recreational use of the drug. As more states legalize marijuana, their non-legalizing neighbors have seen a distinct uptick in marijuana possession and use—and an attendant increase in crime and accidents. In December 2014, Nebraska and Oklahoma, non-legalizing states that border Colorado, a trail-blazer in the full-legalization movement, requested permission to file suit in the U.S. Supreme Court over their neighbor’s lax marijuana controls, which allow cannabis to come into their states. The Supreme Court denied leave to ...