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Articles 181 - 204 of 204

Full-Text Articles in Law

Book Review, Robert F. Nagel Jan 1979

Book Review, Robert F. Nagel

Articles

No abstract provided.


Women In The Law, James J. White Jan 1967

Women In The Law, James J. White

Articles

IN 1869 Belle A. Mansfield, reputedly the first female lawyer admitted to practice in the United States, was admitted to the state bar of Iowa. Others soon followed her and this dribble of women entering the legal profession has grown to a persistent and continuous trickle in the twentieth century, but it shows no signs of becoming a flood. At last count approximately 7,000 out of America's 300,000 listed lawyers were women. Since the practice of law-even in the most masculine and aggressive Perry Mason style-does not require a strong back, large muscles, or any of the ...


Ann Arbor And Legal Aid, James J. White Jan 1967

Ann Arbor And Legal Aid, James J. White

Articles

Since the leasing of its office in August 1965, the Washtenaw County Legal Aid Society has been open nearly 50 hours per week and has been staffed exclusively by second and third-year law students from the University of Michigan Law School. The bulk of the practice has been in family law--divorce, support, custody--but there have been a substantial number of creditor-debtor cases, a handful of misdemeanor defense cases, and a large batch of miscellaneous cases.


Symbolic Logic: A Razor-Edged Tool For Drafting And Interpreting Legal Documents, Layman E. Allen Jan 1957

Symbolic Logic: A Razor-Edged Tool For Drafting And Interpreting Legal Documents, Layman E. Allen

Articles

A large amount of the litigation based on written instruments-whether statute, contract, will, conveyance or regulation-can be traced to the draftsman's failure to convey his meaning clearly. Frequently, of course, certain items may purposely be left ambiguous, but often the question in issue is due to an inadvertent ambiguity that could have been avoided had the draftsman clearly expressed what he intended to say. In this Article it is suggested that a new approach to drafting, using certain elementary notions of symbolic logic, can go a long way towards eliminating such inadvertent ambiguity. This new approach makes available to ...


The Courts And Early Bar Of Washington Territory, Arthur S. Beardsley, Donald A. Mcdonald Jan 1942

The Courts And Early Bar Of Washington Territory, Arthur S. Beardsley, Donald A. Mcdonald

Articles

Territorial justice in Washington had its roots in the judicial system of Oregon Territory, where the need for the administration of law and order was the motivating force which initiated the formation of civil authority The administration of justice, like the civil authority, must expand as the population grows and as the territorial area becomes larger and better organized. Strong men are always needed in the administration of justice; but in the frontier settlement where law and order are often flouted with impunity, even stronger men are needed if the courts are to command the respect which is their due ...


An Inquiry Concerning The Functions Of Procedure In Legal Education, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1923

An Inquiry Concerning The Functions Of Procedure In Legal Education, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

Procedure has always been the bete noire of the law school teacher. No other subject has developed such divergent opinions or such endless debates. None recurs with such periodic frequency and in no field of legal pedagogy has discussion seemed so barren of results. Three different general sessions of the Association of American Law Schools during the last ten years have been devoted largely or wholly to the subject of teaching procedure, and yet no substantial progress seems to have been made toward a standardized scheme of treatment. Individual teachers and schools have their individual views and policies, and they ...


Reinstatement Of Disbarred Attorney, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1922

Reinstatement Of Disbarred Attorney, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

The petitioner asked to be reinstated. The court, excepting Justice Fellows, who concurred in the result but expressed no opinion, said they would be glad to reinstate him but for the fact that he was a non-resident, which in their opinion made him ineligible, but they gave their endorsement of his good character by vacating the order of disbarment. The questions which occur are these: 1. Did the court have the power to vacate its order of disbarment after the time for opening, amending or vacating judgments had passed? 2. Did the vacation of the order of disbarment operate ipso ...


Judicial Statesmen, John B. Waite Jan 1922

Judicial Statesmen, John B. Waite

Articles

KNOWLEDGE of the Common Law "doth no way conduce to the making of a statesman. It is a confined and topicall kind of Learning calculated only for the Meridian of WestministerHall, and reacheth no further than Dover. Transplant a Common Lawyer to Calice, and his head is no more usefull there than a Sun-dyal in a grave." So an anonymous individual placarded England, some three hundred years ago, in protest against the election of lawyers to Parliament. It is unquestionably true, today, that knowledge of the common law-in its customary connotation of precedent--does not in and of itself make a ...


Attorney's Lien For Services - Set-Off Of Judgments, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1920

Attorney's Lien For Services - Set-Off Of Judgments, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

Anglo-Saxon judges, as members of the legal profession, have shown an admirable freedom from professional bias and class selfishness in dealing with questions involving the rights and privileges of members of their profession. With every opportunity offered for treating lawyers as a favored class, they have been able to maintain a detached and objective attitude toward them. Indeed, the courts seem to have preferred to be charged with excessive severity in dealing with their brethren of the bar rather than give the slightest ground for suspicion that they were capitalizing their power in the interest of the legal fraternity.


Privileged Communication Between Attorney And Client-Question Of Whether The Relation Exists Left To Jury-Party Allowed To Assign Error On Ruling Violating The Privilege, Victor H. Lane Jan 1920

Privileged Communication Between Attorney And Client-Question Of Whether The Relation Exists Left To Jury-Party Allowed To Assign Error On Ruling Violating The Privilege, Victor H. Lane

Articles

This procedure was justified in the opinion in State v. Snook (Court of Errors and "Appeals of N. J., 1920), 109 Atl. 289. Snook was on trial for manslaughter charged as having been committed by the reckless driving of an automobile. After the act, Mimmick, one of the persons in the automobile, and afterward a witness for the defense, went to an attorney and had some conversation with him, the substance of which, as testified to by the attorney, was a recital by M. of what had occurred and an inquiry by him of the attorney as to what he ...


Admission To The Bar, Edwin C. Goddard Jan 1918

Admission To The Bar, Edwin C. Goddard

Articles

This article is written in the belief that the hour is here when some changes in admissions to the bar should be urged and urged again, when some things often thought and discussed in certain assemblies should be openly and frankly talked over with the profession at large.


What Is The Outlook For The Lawyer?, Henry M. Bates Jan 1916

What Is The Outlook For The Lawyer?, Henry M. Bates

Articles

This is a question which is being asked with frequency and painful anxiety all over the country by young men expecting to go to the bar and by many who have only recently been admitted. To the veterna practitioner at the bar it may seem presumptuous that devoting his entire time and energy to law school work should undertake any sort of answer to the question thus propounded. Nevertheless, I venture to say the opportunities for studying and estimating the conditions and factors which must be taken into account in reaching and answer are in some respects quite good for ...


A Four Year Course In Law, Henry M. Bates Jan 1915

A Four Year Course In Law, Henry M. Bates

Articles

In the February, 1914, number of The Alumnus, devoted in part to the Michigan Law School, some account was given of the large number of new courses which had been added recently to the curriculum. The courses commented upon in that discussion, besides one advanced course in procedure, deal mainly with what may be called extra-legal or at least extra-professional subjects, such as the History of English Law, the Philosophy of Law and advanced courses in Roman Law and Jurisprudence. Prior to this period of expansion in the law curriculum many other additions had been made to the list of ...


Should Applicants For Admission To The Bar Be Required To Take A Law School Course?, Henry M. Bates Jan 1915

Should Applicants For Admission To The Bar Be Required To Take A Law School Course?, Henry M. Bates

Articles

If the requirements for admission to the bar had been advanced in any thing like equal degree with the progress made in law schools, there would be unqualified reasons for rejoicing in the prospect. Unfortunately, however, this is far from the case, though some notable advances even in this respect have been made. It is remarkable and unfortunate that in America and in Great Britain, whose system of law is undoubtedly the most difficult of all systems in the world to master, we require no institutional or school training of the men who are to fill the important functions of ...


Defects In Our Legal System, Henry M. Bates Jan 1914

Defects In Our Legal System, Henry M. Bates

Articles

That the practice of law and the administration of justice are under a fire of popular distrust and criticism of extraordinary intensity requires no proof. A fact of which there is evidence in numerous contemporary books, in almost every magazine, in the daily papers, in the remarks, or the questions, or it may be in the sneers, of one's friends, requires no further demonstration. The only questions of importance to be answered are to what extent this criticism and this distrust are well founded, what are the remedies for such defects as exist, and how and by whom should ...


Popular Discontent With Law And Some Proposed Remedies, Henry M. Bates Jan 1913

Popular Discontent With Law And Some Proposed Remedies, Henry M. Bates

Articles

That the practice of law and the administration of justice are under the fire of popular distrust and criticism of extraordinary intensity requires no proof. A fact of which there is evidence in numerous contemporary books, in almost every magazine, in the daily papers, in the remarks, or the questions, or it may be in the sneers of one's friends, requires no further demonstration. The only questions of importance to be answered are to what extent this criticism and this distrust are well founded, what are the remedies for such defects as exist, and what are we lawyers going ...


The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1912

The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

In one respect the law is the most perplexing subject with which a man can deal. It shifts and changes so rapidly that only a nimble and diligent student can keep abreast of it. One is likely to wake up any morning and find that the legislature has repealed a good part of what he knows, and he is in constant danger of having his most carefully formed opinions completely upset by a new decision of the Supreme Court. These violent changes are not due to any new discoveries, such as constantly enliven the scientific world, but merely to the ...


The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland Jan 1909

The Art Of Legal Practice, Edson R. Sunderland

Articles

In one respect the law is the most perplexing subject with which a man can deal. It shifts and changes so rapidly that only a nimble and diligent student can keep abreast of it. One is likely to wake up any morning and find that the legislature has repealed a good part of what he knows, and he is in constant danger of having his most carefully formed opinions completely upset by a new decision of the Supreme Court. These violent changes are not due to any new discoveries, such as constantly enliven the scientific world, but merely to the ...


The Law Teacher--His Functions And Responsibilities, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1908

The Law Teacher--His Functions And Responsibilities, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The notion that the teaching of the law is quite as much a profession as is the practice of it, and that it demands an intellectual equipment of a high order, is probably gaining ground. It is fully recognized by those who understand what systematic legal education, as carried on to-day in our leading law schools, really is. But as yet the majority of laymen, and very many lawyers, probably most lawyers who were educated under the old regime as well as most of those who have come to the bar through the law office, fail to appreciate the full ...


Disbarment Or Suspension Of Attorney, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1907

Disbarment Or Suspension Of Attorney, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The decision of the Supreme Court of Oregon in the case of State ex rel Grievance Committee of State Bar Association v. Tanner, rendered Jan. 12, 19O7, 88 Pac. Rep. 301, is of sufficient importance to merit brief notice. The proceeding was instituted by the grievance committee of the State Bar Association for the removal from practice of the defendant, an attorney at law, under a statute of the State that provides for the removal or suspension of an attorney from practice by the Supreme Court "upon his being convicted of a felony or of a misdemeanor involving moral turpitude."


Some Observations On Case Law Reporting, John R. Rood Jan 1906

Some Observations On Case Law Reporting, John R. Rood

Articles

There is an old tradition, still believed by many lawyers, that these year-books were official reports made by a reporter appointed and paid by the king. If there ever was such a reporter, he is yet to be discovered. No year-books have been found in the treasury of the courts; there is no record of the appointment or payment of any official reporter, through all the two hundred and fifty years covered by the year-books; all the year-books now in the British Museum were found in private hands.2 Is it conceivable that an official reporter would criticize the court ...


Embarrassments To Legal Education, Jerome C. Knowlton Jan 1892

Embarrassments To Legal Education, Jerome C. Knowlton

Articles

In European countries a student is not allowed to undertake the study of law until he has received a degree equivalent to the A. B. degree in American colleges, and the minimum term of study is three years, and in some cases four or even five years are required. With some mortification, we recognize that the profession of law in this country has not approximated this high standard.


Law Schools And Legal Education, Henry W. Rogers Jan 1888

Law Schools And Legal Education, Henry W. Rogers

Articles

In the February number of the AMERICAN LAW REGISTER, there appeared an interesting article from the pen of Mr. Henry Budd, discussing the relation of law schools to legal education. The motive which inspired the writing of the article, was a commendable one, and the desire of the writer to have a higher standard established, governing admissions to the bar, will be quite generally concurred in. No one could read the article in question, however, without readily perceiving that the law schools of the United States were considered to be, in large measure, responsible for the admission to the bar ...


Materials Of Jurisprudence, James V. Campbell Dec 1879

Materials Of Jurisprudence, James V. Campbell

Articles

This period is marked by rather more strenuous efforts than have been made before in this country, to solve the problem of condensing and simplifying the law. Our own day is peculiar in the endeavors we have seen to evolve what is claimed to be a science of jurisprudence. Some admirable writers have succeeded in dividing the domain of law into its larger or smaller fields, and have shown with more or less fulness the relative positions of these, and their mutual dependence. This is a valuable service; for all lawyers know that, without a reasonably clear perception of the ...