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Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

International Law

Traditional knowledge

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Protecting Traditional Agricultural Knowledge, Stephen B. Brush Jan 2005

Protecting Traditional Agricultural Knowledge, Stephen B. Brush

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Until the end of the last century, crop genetic resources were managed as public domain goods according to a set of practices loosely labeled as “common heritage.” The rise of intellectual property for plants, the commercialization of seed, the increasing use of genetic resources in crop breeding, and the declining availability of crop genetic resources have contributed to extensive revisions to the common heritage regime. Changes include specifying national ownership over genetic resources and use of contracts in the movement of resources between countries. This Essay explores the impact of these changes in cradle areas of crop domestication, evolution and ...


From The Shaman's Hut To The Patent Office: In Search Of A Trips-Consistent Requirement To Disclose The Origin Of Genetic Resources And Prior Informed Consent, Nuno Pires De Carvalho Jan 2005

From The Shaman's Hut To The Patent Office: In Search Of A Trips-Consistent Requirement To Disclose The Origin Of Genetic Resources And Prior Informed Consent, Nuno Pires De Carvalho

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

The introduction in patent statutes of a requirement to disclose the origin of genetic resources and prior informed consent of the use of traditional knowledge in claimed inventions (hereinafter “the Requirement”) has been at the center of an international debate for the last few years. Many developing, biodiversity-rich countries consider that the Requirement is an essential component of a broader approach to patent law, which should be informed by considerations of economic development. At the other end of the spectrum, a few industrialized countries believe that the Requirement is not only incompatible with current international law, in particular the TRIPS ...