Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

International Law

Human rights

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Law

Indian Givers: What Indigenous Peoples Have Contributed To International Human Rights Law, S. James Anaya Jan 2006

Indian Givers: What Indigenous Peoples Have Contributed To International Human Rights Law, S. James Anaya

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

The remarks that follow summarize how the claims of indigenous peoples have not only taken advantage of changes in the character of international law but have also contributed to those changes, particularly in the area of human rights. These changes are beneficial not just for indigenous peoples themselves but the humanity more broadly. Part I describes the nature of disparate international legal arguments employed by indigenous peoples and how those arguments have tended toward a human rights discourse. Part II discusses specific ways in which the indigenous human rights discourse has contributed to the evolution of international human rights law.


Human Rights Of Women, Aida González Martínez Jan 2001

Human Rights Of Women, Aida González Martínez

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Freedom, justice, and peace are based on the recognition of the dignity inherent to the human family and to its equal and inalienable rights. It is thus emphasized in the third paragraph of Article 1 of the United Nations Charter when referring to the endeavor of the international community to achieve international cooperation in “solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural or humanitarian character, and in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language, or religion.” It is also declared in the first paragraph of the preamble ...


Introduction: The Un And The Protection Of Human Rights, Stephen H. Legomsky Jan 2001

Introduction: The Un And The Protection Of Human Rights, Stephen H. Legomsky

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

The essential premise of modern international human rights law is that there is still hope. Human rights activists today ask practical questions, not just philosophical ones. What specific, concrete actions can the world community, states, NGOs, and individuals take, and what mechanisms can they establish, to put an end to the madness?

In various ways, the contributors to the present colloquium address themselves to these fundamental questions. They come from different regions of the world, different professional experiences, and different personal backgrounds, but they have in common an unmistakable longing to solidify respect for human rights and the rule of ...


Global Governments And Democratization, John B. Anderson Jan 2001

Global Governments And Democratization, John B. Anderson

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This essay addresses the questions of interpretation and reform that surround the United Nations and the UN Charter in consideration of a changing, global world. Particular attention is given to the need for "international civil society" to foster a culture of peace and justice. The paper poses a challenge for democratization and reform to mobilize and give voice to an empowered UN.


When, If Ever, May States Deploy Military Force Without Prior Security Council Authorization?, Thomas M. Franck Jan 2001

When, If Ever, May States Deploy Military Force Without Prior Security Council Authorization?, Thomas M. Franck

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Were the Charter a static instrument bound exclusively to the textually expressed intent of its drafters, the profound incapacitation of the Security Council and the absence of a stand-by police force might have put paid to the Charter’s collective security system. Instead, the system has adapted, specifically by uncoupling Article 43 from Article 42 and by broadening the authority of states to act in self-defense under Article 51. These adaptions, brought about precedent-by-precedent, are worth noting.


United Nations Peacekeeping Operations And The Use Of Fforce, Ruth Wedgwood Jan 2001

United Nations Peacekeeping Operations And The Use Of Fforce, Ruth Wedgwood

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

When one views the UN up close, in the field and in New York, much of the unsteadiness in discharging its missions stems from the organization’s deep ambivalence about the proper use of force in international conflict resolution and its hobbled ability to muster efficacious force.


The Global Challenge Of Internal Displacement, Francis Mading Deng Jan 2001

The Global Challenge Of Internal Displacement, Francis Mading Deng

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

I would like to address the subject of internal displacement from the perspective of four issues: the magnitude of the crisis, my conceptual approach to the mandate, the scope of activities I have undertaken pursuant to the mandate, and the need to address the root causes of internal displacement.