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Full-Text Articles in Law

E Unum Pluribus: After Bond V. United States, State Law As A Gap Filler To Meet The International Obligations Of The United States, Llewellyn J. Gibbons Jan 2015

E Unum Pluribus: After Bond V. United States, State Law As A Gap Filler To Meet The International Obligations Of The United States, Llewellyn J. Gibbons

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

Intellectual property issues are among the most significant and hotly contested issues in foreign policy that require treaties that regulate private domestic actors. This Article analyzes two intellectual property examples, one from Berne Convention and the other from the Paris Convention, where state law supplements federal law to provide the minimum level of legal protection required under each treaty. The Article provides an overview of Bond v. United States and then analyzes whether the federal law of preemption or principles of international law require states to develop their law in a manner consistent with US foreign policy. The Article then ...


“Snowed In” In Russia: A Historical Analysis Of American And Russian Extradition And How The Snowden Saga Might Impact The Future, William C. Herrington Jan 2015

“Snowed In” In Russia: A Historical Analysis Of American And Russian Extradition And How The Snowden Saga Might Impact The Future, William C. Herrington

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

After Edward Snowden—an American citizen charged with theft and unauthorized communication of classified defense information (among other things)—was granted asylum by the Russian Federation, relations between the United States and Russia deteriorated rapidly. This Note analyzes the history of American and Russian extradition agreements and provides a sample extradition agreement that, if enacted prior to Russia’s asylum grant, may have altered the outcome.