Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Griswold Penumbra: Constitutional Charter For An Expanded Law Of Privacy?, Robert G. Dixon Jr. Dec 1965

The Griswold Penumbra: Constitutional Charter For An Expanded Law Of Privacy?, Robert G. Dixon Jr.

Michigan Law Review

The comments that follow are divided into a brief review, for purposes of perspective, of the elusive nature of "privacy" as developed in American law to date, and an attempted rigorous analysis of the privacy aspects of Griswold. A final section suggests that effectuation of the new constitutional right of marital privacy necessarily or derivatively implies a corollary right of access to birth control information and devices-a right which should have been more clearly articulated by the Court.


The Right Of Privacy: Emanations And Intimations, Robert B. Mckay Dec 1965

The Right Of Privacy: Emanations And Intimations, Robert B. Mckay

Michigan Law Review

When Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren wrote in 1890 of "The Right to Privacy," they sought a means of protecting against unwelcome newspaper attention to social activities in the Warren household. Addressing their argument to the private law of torts, they presumably did not anticipate constitutional protection for other rights under the claim of privacy. Nevertheless, seventy· five years later that concept, now called the "right of privacy," was used by the Supreme Court of the United States in Griswold v. Connecticut to describe a constitutional right. Some members of the Court said the new right was within the "penumbra ...


Nine Justices In Search Of A Doctrine, Thomas I. Emerson Dec 1965

Nine Justices In Search Of A Doctrine, Thomas I. Emerson

Michigan Law Review

To the ordinary layman, Griswold v. Connecticut seemed easy. But to the lawyer it was somewhat more difficult. The lawyer's problem with the case was that the issues did not readily fit into any existing legal pigeonhole. Actually, there were five possibilities. The case could have been dealt with under the equal protection clause, the first amendment, substantive due process, the right of privacy, or, in extremis, the ninth amendment. In order to strike down the statute under any of these doctrines, however, the Court would be forced to enter uncharted waters. Whatever course the Court took, its action ...


Privacy In Connecticut, Arthur E. Sutherland Dec 1965

Privacy In Connecticut, Arthur E. Sutherland

Michigan Law Review

Occasionally a judgment of our Supreme Court, delivered in a superficially petty case, suddenly before our startled eyes displays fundamentals of our constitutional theory. Thus, in Griswold v. Connecticut, holding unconstitutional an 1879 Connecticut statute forbidding all persons to use contraceptive devices, the Court found it necessary to discover a "right of privacy" latent in the Bill of Rights and incorporated into the due process clause of the fourteenth amendment. The outcome of the case is satisfying; all nine Justices joined in saying, in one way or another, that Connecticut's statute was nonsense. I am happy to see this ...


Penumbras, Peripheries, Emanations, Things Fundamental And Things Forgotten: The Griswold Case, Paul G. Kauper Dec 1965

Penumbras, Peripheries, Emanations, Things Fundamental And Things Forgotten: The Griswold Case, Paul G. Kauper

Michigan Law Review

The varying theories followed in the several opinions in the Griswold case can be fully understood and appreciated only in the context of the tortuous but fascinating history of the judicial interpretation of the fourteenth amendment.


Widow's Succession In Common-Law Property State To Husband's Rights In Her Half Of Community Property Is Taxable And Valued At One-Half Of Entire Community--In Re Kessler's Estate, Michigan Law Review Nov 1965

Widow's Succession In Common-Law Property State To Husband's Rights In Her Half Of Community Property Is Taxable And Valued At One-Half Of Entire Community--In Re Kessler's Estate, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

While residing with his wife in California, decedent purchased stock, which under California law became community property. The couple later moved to Ohio, a common-law property state, where decedent died. An Ohio probate court approved the executor's determination that the widow's one-half interest in the stock was not subject to the Ohio succession tax. On appeal by the state tax commissioner to the Ohio Supreme Court, held, reversed, three judges dissenting. A wife's succession to her husband's right to manage and control her half of the community property is subject to the Ohio succession tax on ...


Net Operating Loss Sustained By Taxpayer Prior To Marriage Cannot Be Applied Subsequently Against Spouse's Income- Calvin V. United States, Michigan Law Review Jun 1965

Net Operating Loss Sustained By Taxpayer Prior To Marriage Cannot Be Applied Subsequently Against Spouse's Income- Calvin V. United States, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Prior to marriage, plaintiff-wife sustained net operating losses which she was entitled to carry over under section 172 of the Internal Revenue Code. For the year 1959, the plaintiffs filed a joint return in which they applied the wife's net operating loss carryover deduction to both of their incomes. The Commissioner allowed the loss carryover to be applied to the wife's but not to the husband's income. In a suit for refund of taxes withheld from the husband's wages, held, judgment for defendant. If a husband and wife elect to file a joint return, net operating ...


Marital Deduction Formula Clauses In Estate Planning-Estate And Income Tax Considerations, Alan N. Polasky Mar 1965

Marital Deduction Formula Clauses In Estate Planning-Estate And Income Tax Considerations, Alan N. Polasky

Michigan Law Review

Once upon a time, and not so very long ago, a child was born, much to the delight of its lawyer-parents. As children will, it brought much joy and only occasional moments of dismay and concern during its early, formative years. But one day it entered the terrible teens, and at age sixteen it became, like many teen-agers, baffling, confusing, and frustrating, giving rise to frenzied attempts to cope with and control the complexities of its behavior. Its name? The Federal Estate Tax Marital Deduction.


Reasonable Separation Agreement Executed On Understanding That Wife Would Obtain Foreign Divorce Is Invalid-Viles V. Viles, Michigan Law Review Feb 1965

Reasonable Separation Agreement Executed On Understanding That Wife Would Obtain Foreign Divorce Is Invalid-Viles V. Viles, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

In July 1951, plaintiff and her husband, both New York residents, separated under a temporary agreement entitling the wife to 400 dollars a month for support. Soon thereafter, the husband urged his wife to divorce him, but she would not assent unless he raised her support payments to 459 dollars per month. This increase was embodied in a permanent separation agreement, executed in October 1951, which the husband signed on the oral understanding that the wife would obtain a divorce in the Virgin Islands. The wife journeyed to the Virgin Islands and, in December 1951, obtained a valid divorce decree ...