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University of Michigan Law School

Marriage

Tax Law

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The Haitian Vacation: The Applicability Of Sham Doctrine To Year-End Divorces, Michigan Law Review May 1979

The Haitian Vacation: The Applicability Of Sham Doctrine To Year-End Divorces, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

This Note examines the propriety of applying the sham doctrine to tax-motivated divorces. Section I outlines the evolution of the sham doctrine from its exposition in Gregory v. Helvering through its expression in two different tests for commercial transactions. Section II then studies the relationship between state divorce law and the marital status provisions of the Internal Revenue Code to demonstrate the clear congressional preference for incorporating state law by reference rather than creating an independent federal law of marriage. It also examines the history of the 1969 Tax Reform Act in a vain effort to discern a congressional desire ...


Joint Tenancy: The Estate Lawyer's Continuing Burden, John E. Riecker Mar 1966

Joint Tenancy: The Estate Lawyer's Continuing Burden, John E. Riecker

Michigan Law Review

The discussion which follows will be divided into three major parts. First, it will be important to see why so much real and personal property remains in joint tenancy between husband and wife or in entireties tenancy. It has been almost eighteen years since Congress eliminated the necessity of holding property in this form in order to split income therefrom for income tax purposes. Is inertia the only reason for the popularity of joint ownership, or are there other reasons? Second, we shall review the familiar but false assumptions most laymen (and even a few attorneys) commonly make regarding the ...


Widow's Succession In Common-Law Property State To Husband's Rights In Her Half Of Community Property Is Taxable And Valued At One-Half Of Entire Community--In Re Kessler's Estate, Michigan Law Review Nov 1965

Widow's Succession In Common-Law Property State To Husband's Rights In Her Half Of Community Property Is Taxable And Valued At One-Half Of Entire Community--In Re Kessler's Estate, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

While residing with his wife in California, decedent purchased stock, which under California law became community property. The couple later moved to Ohio, a common-law property state, where decedent died. An Ohio probate court approved the executor's determination that the widow's one-half interest in the stock was not subject to the Ohio succession tax. On appeal by the state tax commissioner to the Ohio Supreme Court, held, reversed, three judges dissenting. A wife's succession to her husband's right to manage and control her half of the community property is subject to the Ohio succession tax on ...


Net Operating Loss Sustained By Taxpayer Prior To Marriage Cannot Be Applied Subsequently Against Spouse's Income- Calvin V. United States, Michigan Law Review Jun 1965

Net Operating Loss Sustained By Taxpayer Prior To Marriage Cannot Be Applied Subsequently Against Spouse's Income- Calvin V. United States, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

Prior to marriage, plaintiff-wife sustained net operating losses which she was entitled to carry over under section 172 of the Internal Revenue Code. For the year 1959, the plaintiffs filed a joint return in which they applied the wife's net operating loss carryover deduction to both of their incomes. The Commissioner allowed the loss carryover to be applied to the wife's but not to the husband's income. In a suit for refund of taxes withheld from the husband's wages, held, judgment for defendant. If a husband and wife elect to file a joint return, net operating ...


Marital Deduction Formula Clauses In Estate Planning-Estate And Income Tax Considerations, Alan N. Polasky Mar 1965

Marital Deduction Formula Clauses In Estate Planning-Estate And Income Tax Considerations, Alan N. Polasky

Michigan Law Review

Once upon a time, and not so very long ago, a child was born, much to the delight of its lawyer-parents. As children will, it brought much joy and only occasional moments of dismay and concern during its early, formative years. But one day it entered the terrible teens, and at age sixteen it became, like many teen-agers, baffling, confusing, and frustrating, giving rise to frenzied attempts to cope with and control the complexities of its behavior. Its name? The Federal Estate Tax Marital Deduction.