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Review Of The Choice Theory Of Contracts, Nicolas Cornell Jan 2017

Review Of The Choice Theory Of Contracts, Nicolas Cornell

Reviews

This book aims to provide a new approach to thinking about the role of contract law in a liberal state. The fundamental idea is that the law should affirmatively facilitate citizens' autonomy by creating and sustaining various different types of contractual relationships so that citizens have the option to choose among them. The authors start from the idea that "bargaining for terms is not the dominant mode of contracting . . . the mainstay of present-day contracting is the choice among types" (2-3). We choose to relate as employees or independent contractors, married or just cohabiting, merchants selling goods or private individuals selling ...


The Model Of Plans And The Prospects For Positivism, Scott Hershovitz Jan 2014

The Model Of Plans And The Prospects For Positivism, Scott Hershovitz

Reviews

In Legality, Scott Shapiro builds his case for legal positivism on a simple premise: laws are plans. Recognition of that fact leads to legal positivism, Shapiro says, because the content of a plan is fixed by social facts. In this essay, I argue that Shapiro’s case for legal positivism fails. Moreover, I argue that we can learn important lessons about the prospects for positivism by attending to the ways in the argument fails. As I show, the flaws in Shapiro’s argument reveal structural problems with a family of prominent positivist views, including the one defended by Joseph Raz.


Review Of Corrective Justice, By E. Weinrib, Scott Hershovitz Jan 2013

Review Of Corrective Justice, By E. Weinrib, Scott Hershovitz

Reviews

I once heard it said of a famous philosopher of law that he never allowed his philosophy to be polluted by law. No one will ever say that about Ernie Weinrib. His latest book - Corrective Justice - is exceptional precisely because Weinrib is deeply informed about legal doctrine. Of course, he also has formidable philosophical skill, and in bringing that to bear on doctrine, he dismantles any thought that corrective justice is too abstract a concept to shed light on the practical problems that courts face. Along the way, he also demol­ ishes the instrumentalism that has recently dominated scholarship about ...


Cute Prickly Critter With Presbyopia, Donald J. Herzog Jan 2012

Cute Prickly Critter With Presbyopia, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

Ronald Dworkin's' latest, long-awaited, and most ambitious book is a puzzle. Truth in advertising first: despite the title, this isn't centrally a book about justice. It's a book about the realm of value-all of that realm. Dworkin is most interested here in morality, but really touches on all of it, as a matter of the application of the abstract argument and sometimes in black and white right on the page, from aesthetics to prudence to morality to politics to law to . . . . It's fun to read, also frustrating. It stretches out lazily in handling some issues but ...


Review Of The Philosophy Of Positive Law: Foundations Of Jurisprudence, Howard Bromberg Jan 2007

Review Of The Philosophy Of Positive Law: Foundations Of Jurisprudence, Howard Bromberg

Reviews

This meticulously researched book addresses a central question of analytical and philosophical jurisprudence: What is positive law? Throughout his analysis, James Bernard Murphy, author of The Moral Economy of Labor: Aristotelian Themes in Economic Theory (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1993), contrasts positive law with the other two kinds of law that constitute the triad of legal concepts - natural law and customary law. Although they are treated at length in this work, Murphy states in the preface that he intends to write a companion volume on natural law and customary law, "thus completing the foundation of philosophical jurisprudence" (p. x ...


Review Of Explaining The English Revolution: Hobbes And His Contemporaries, Donald J. Herzog Jan 2003

Review Of Explaining The English Revolution: Hobbes And His Contemporaries, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

The explosion of primary texts from seven- teenth-century England continues to trigger an explosion of scholarly treatments today. For good reason, too: Lots of the primary texts are amazing, and not just those tired old warhors- es, Hobbes's Leviathan and Locke's Second Treatise. As fun and challenging as the primary texts are, you are forgiven a touch of skepticism if you wonder just what the latest author has to add to our understanding. You might redouble your skepticism if you just glance at Mark Stephen Jendrysik's table of contents, offering chapters on Winstanley, Milton, Cromwell, Filmer, and ...


Review Of The Dark Side Of The Left: Illiberal Egalitarianism In America, Donald J. Herzog Jan 2000

Review Of The Dark Side Of The Left: Illiberal Egalitarianism In America, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

In this elegantly written, provocative, and sometimes just plain provoking book, punctuated by bits of anguish and rather more pique, Richard Ellis worries that the American Left has been so passionate about equality that it has run roughshod over liberty. So put, the thesis is not exactly news. It has been the recurrent lament of conservative indictments- Tocqueville's is the canonical statement, but he has plenty of precursors and followers. And it has its scholarly variations, too, such as Arthur Lipow, Authoritarian Socialism in America: Edward Bellamy and the Nationalist Movement (1982). No profound surprises are on offer here.


Review Of Political Theory For Mortals: Shades Of Justice, Images Of Death, Donald J. Herzog Jan 1998

Review Of Political Theory For Mortals: Shades Of Justice, Images Of Death, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

Daring to go where plenty of mortals have gone before him, John Seery sets out to explore death. The resulting volume, more episodic than sustained, is brash, even feverishly energetic, as though Seery is desperately cheery about his chosen topic. This book is by turns witty and irritating, its interesting conjectures and lines of argument intimately mixed up with what this stodgy reader saw as frivolous posturing. It's easy to lampoon Seery's prose style; in fact, all one needs to do is quote it. Socrates, we learn, is "a blowhard buffoon," or at least readers might reasonably see ...


Review Of On Voluntary Servitude: False Consciousness And The Theory Of Ideology, Donald J. Herzog Jan 1997

Review Of On Voluntary Servitude: False Consciousness And The Theory Of Ideology, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

Michael Rosen brings intoxicating erudition and an elegant if elusive prose style to crack—or pulverize—one of the most venerable chestnuts of social theory, the theory of ideology. For Rosen, the two central elements of that theory are (1) that societies are self-maintaining systems and (2) that they produce false consciousness in their members precisely because it helps to maintain society. And for Rosen, the theory is, well, a spectacular mess. Despite the efforts of such analytical Marxists as G. A. Cohen, he urges, no such view can be reconstructed in ways that begin to comport with our ordinary ...


Review Of Reason And Rhetoric In The Philosophy Of Hobbes, Donald J. Herzog Jan 1997

Review Of Reason And Rhetoric In The Philosophy Of Hobbes, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

In the 1960s, Quentin Skinner wrote a series of polemical if terse papers arguing that the conventional approach to the history of political theory was confused. Using Hobbes as something of a vehicle for his position, Skinner enunciated what is now well known as the "Cambridge" approach to political theory. He urged that we situate authors in their intellectual contexts so that we can isolate what is distinctive, perhaps subversive, in their use of language: only then, he argued, can we have any valid historical understanding on what they are doing in writing these weird books in the first place ...


Review Of The Idea Of A Liberal Theory: A Critique And Reconstruction, Donald J. Herzog Jan 1995

Review Of The Idea Of A Liberal Theory: A Critique And Reconstruction, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

The flood of literature sometimes derisively referred to as the Rawls/Nozick industry shows no signs of slowing. David Johnston enters the lists to champion an unabashedly cosmopolitan view-humanist liberalism-that focuses on promoting human agency for any and all people in any and all societies. He concedes that he has in place only a rudimentary sketch.


Review Of Political Discourse In Early Modern Britain, Donald J. Herzog Jan 1994

Review Of Political Discourse In Early Modern Britain, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

This is a festschrift for the indefatigable J. G. A. Pocock (indefatigable indeed: the volume closes with a daunting nine-page bibliography of Pococks work to date, a veritable flood of erudition that shows no signs of ebbing). The essays are better than what usually end up stuck in such volumes: better as a simple matter of scholarly quality, but better too as exemplary models of what is distinctive in Pocock's approach. I suppose that at this price, no one will consider asking impoverished graduate students to purchase the volume. But there are always reserve desks, not to mention xerox ...


Review Of Willful Liberalism: Voluntarism And Individuality In Political Theory And Practice, Donald J. Herzog Jan 1993

Review Of Willful Liberalism: Voluntarism And Individuality In Political Theory And Practice, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

This is an elegant and studied little volume, rather more difficult than it lets on. Flathman wants to argue that liberals are sorely in need of a more robust understanding of the will and individuality than they now possess, that they (or we) should be enthusiastically embracing what might seem to be some tendentious commitments about the partial but inescapable opacity of other selves. He does so by working through a large number of texts and authors-some only contentiously called liberal (Hobbes); others not conceivably liberal (William of Ockham, Augustine, Nietzsche); and still others not obviously interested in anything narrowly ...


Whose Loyalties?, Christina B. Whitman Jan 1993

Whose Loyalties?, Christina B. Whitman

Reviews

It is disconcerting to open a book subtitled An Essay on the Morality of Relationships and find that the two case studies that most interest the author are reciting the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools and the criminalization of flag burning. Although George Fletcher begins to make his case for giving moral priority to loyalties by referring to the impulse to save one's mother from a burning house (p. 12), he is more concerned with the ties that bind individuals to groups than with the ethics of relationships between individuals. The loyalties to which Fletcher would give "moral ...


Review Of Transforming Political Discourse, Donald J. Herzog Jan 1991

Review Of Transforming Political Discourse, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

Political theorists are almost always fond of giving each other home- work assignments but not generally fond of completing them. The opening salvo in a promised three-volume campaign to redefine the tasks of political theory, Transforming Political Discourse might seem to invite more weary shrugs. Surely, we have too many manifestos already. Well, yes -but this one, happily, is modest, sensible, and mercifully brief. Better yet, its brevity is positively austere in sketching the metadescription of what the promised land looks like. The argument actually hangs on a series of show-and-tell exercises, which are supposed to be applications of the ...


Review Of Jurisprudence: Men And Ideas Of The Law, By E. W. Patterson, John W. Reed Jan 1954

Review Of Jurisprudence: Men And Ideas Of The Law, By E. W. Patterson, John W. Reed

Reviews

Jurisprudence: Men and Ideas of the Law was written as a textbook for students enrolled in Columbia's jurisprudence course. It appeared first inmimeograph in 1940, and has gone through three revisions before emerging in its present printed form. Thirteen years is not a record incubation period, but it typifies the care and thoroughness with which Professor Patterson works and with which he has prepared the present volume. Each sentence, each paragraph, each section is, to me, a clear statement of his meaning and serves his purpose well.


The Equality Of States, A Study In The History Of Law, Edwin D. Dickinson Jan 1924

The Equality Of States, A Study In The History Of Law, Edwin D. Dickinson

Reviews

"This is a reprint in book form of three essays recently published by Dr. Goebel in the Columbia Law Review. The author attempts, as he himself has expressed it, 'to indicate that the historical background of the doctrine of equality of states in international law is of considerable importance not only for the purpose of fixing the origin of the doctrine as a coherent principle of law, but also because it indicates how necessary and inevitable the notion has been from the very inception of international relationships in Europe.'"