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Full-Text Articles in Law

Alexa, Amazon Assistant Or Government Informant?, Julia R. Shackleton Esq. Apr 2019

Alexa, Amazon Assistant Or Government Informant?, Julia R. Shackleton Esq.

University of Miami Business Law Review

Alexa, are you listening to me? Technology has become an integral part of one’s everyday life with voice-controlled devices pervading our most intimate interactions and spaces within the home. The answers to our questions are now at our fingertips with the simple roll of the tongue “Alexa,” your very own personal intelligence assistant. This futuristic household tool can perform tasks that range from answering simple voice commands to ordering any online shopping. However, the advent of voice technology presents a myriad of problems. Concerns arise as these new devices live in the privacy of our homes while quietly listening ...


Breaches Within Breaches: The Crossroads Of Erisa Fiduciary Responsibilities And Data Security, Gregg Moran Feb 2019

Breaches Within Breaches: The Crossroads Of Erisa Fiduciary Responsibilities And Data Security, Gregg Moran

University of Miami Law Review

Although the drafters of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) likely could not have anticipated the data security issues of the twenty-first century, ERISA’s duty of prudence almost certainly requires employee benefit plan fiduciaries to protect sensitive participant data in at least some manner. This Article suggests the Department of Labor should issue a regulation clarifying fiduciaries’ data security obligations. Given that fiduciaries are in the best positions to recognize their plans’ individual security needs and capabilities, the regulation should not attempt to micromanage fiduciaries’ substantive data security policies; rather, it should focus on the procedures ...


The Privacy Hierarchy: A Comparative Analysis Of The Intimate Privacy Protection Act Vs. The Geolocational Privacy And Surveillance Act, Katherine A. Mitchell Feb 2019

The Privacy Hierarchy: A Comparative Analysis Of The Intimate Privacy Protection Act Vs. The Geolocational Privacy And Surveillance Act, Katherine A. Mitchell

University of Miami Law Review

The advent of the technological boom brought the world smartphones, social media, and Siri. These novel benefits, however, were accompanied by unchartered invasions of privacy. Congress has embarked on the seemingly endless path of protecting its constituents through civil and criminal legislation aimed at combatting such invasions. Two recent examples include the Intimate Privacy Protection Act (“IPPA”) and the Geolocational Privacy and Surveillance Act (“GPS Act”). Nonetheless, the IPPA, which was proposed to criminalize the dissemination of nonconsensual pornography, has garnered much less support—and much more criticism—than its geolocational counterpart.

This Note discusses the striking similarities of both ...


Biometric Identification In India Versus The Right To Privacy: Core Constitutional Features, Defining Citizens’ Interests, And The Implications Of Biometric Identification In The United States, Madison Julia Levine Feb 2019

Biometric Identification In India Versus The Right To Privacy: Core Constitutional Features, Defining Citizens’ Interests, And The Implications Of Biometric Identification In The United States, Madison Julia Levine

University of Miami Law Review

In 2009, the Indian government introduced a widespread biometric identification system called Aadhaar—a national scheme that issues Indian citizens and residents a unique identification number while collecting and storing their most personal biometric and demographic information. As the Aadhaar system was implemented and promoted in India, widespread concerns grew regarding the storage and protection of such private information. How can Indian citizens enforce and protect their privacy rights? In 2017, the Indian Supreme Court attempted to address this issue by holding that an individual’s right to privacy is an inherent part of the right to life and personal ...