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The Ground On Which We All Stand: A Conversation About Menstrual Equity Law And Activism, Bridget J. Crawford, Margaret E. Johnson, Marcy L. Karin, Laura Strausfeld, Emily Gold Waldman Jan 2020

The Ground On Which We All Stand: A Conversation About Menstrual Equity Law And Activism, Bridget J. Crawford, Margaret E. Johnson, Marcy L. Karin, Laura Strausfeld, Emily Gold Waldman

All Faculty Scholarship

This essay grows out of a panel discussion among five lawyers on the subject of menstrual equity activism. Each of the authors is a scholar, activist, or organizer involved in some form of menstrual equity work. The overall project is both enriched and complicated by an intersectional analysis. This essay increases awareness of existing menstrual equity and menstrual justice work; it also identifies avenues for further inquiry, next steps for legal action, and opportunities that lie ahead. After describing prior and current work at the junction of law and menstruation, the contributors evaluate the successes and limitations of recent legal ...


Menstrual Justice, Margaret E. Johnson Jan 2019

Menstrual Justice, Margaret E. Johnson

All Faculty Scholarship

Menstrual injustice is the oppression of menstruators, women, girls, transgender men and boys, and nonbinary persons, simply because they menstruate. Acts of menstrual injustice occur every day in the United States. The narrative of menstruation is that it is a taboo, shameful, and that menstruators are dirty, impure, even dangerous. Menstruation has been shunned generally from public discourse as a result. This narrative negatively impacts menstruators. Menstruators are essentialized as women, often of means, excluding transgender men and nonbinary persons, and menstruators who experience poverty or are young. Menstruating workers, especially low-wage workers, are harassed, penalized, or fired for heavy ...


A Justice System Overwhelmed, Colin Starger Feb 2015

A Justice System Overwhelmed, Colin Starger

All Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


“Injustice Anywhere Is A Threat To Justice Everywhere” Internal Vs. International Armed Conflicts: Should The Distinction Be Eliminated?, Laura Chafey Jan 2012

“Injustice Anywhere Is A Threat To Justice Everywhere” Internal Vs. International Armed Conflicts: Should The Distinction Be Eliminated?, Laura Chafey

University of Baltimore Journal of International Law

This article discusses international humanitarian law, particularly the Geneva Conventions and its Additional Protocols. It analyzes the rights of protected persons under the Geneva Conventions, such as prisoners of war and civilians, as well as the obligations of States during armed conflicts. Furthermore, the article points out the flaws in the Geneva Conventions, such as the discrepancy between the obligations of States during an international armed conflict vs. during an internal armed conflicts. It argues that this distinction between international and internal armed conflicts should be eliminated and that States’ obligations should be the same for both conflicts.


Different Roads To The Rule Of Law: Their Importance For Law Reform In Taiwan, James Maxeiner Dec 2003

Different Roads To The Rule Of Law: Their Importance For Law Reform In Taiwan, James Maxeiner

All Faculty Scholarship

Talk of law reform is in the air throughout East Asia. Whether in Beijing or Tokyo or here, law reform is spoken of in terms of strengthening the Rule of Law. But what is the Rule of Law? Different legal systems have different roads to reach the Rule of Law. These different roads are noticeable mainly in the different emphases different systems place on two critical elements in the realization of the Rule of Law State, namely rules and the machinery for implementing the rules, i.e., courts and administrative agencies. The Rule of Law makes demands on both the ...


Accountability In The Aftermath Of Rwanda's Genocide, Jason Strain, Elizabeth Keyes Jan 2003

Accountability In The Aftermath Of Rwanda's Genocide, Jason Strain, Elizabeth Keyes

All Faculty Scholarship

Over the span of 100 days in 1994, almost one million Rwandans died in a genocide that left Rwandan society traumatized and its institutions in disarray. The genocide implicated not only the actual instigators and killers, who came from all levels of Rwandan society, but also the culture of impunity that had thrived in Rwanda for decades. This culture of impunity and inaction in the face of atrocities eerily mirrored the international community's failure to intervene to prevent or respond to the genocide. The genocide provoked a process of reflection within Rwanda and the broader international community about how ...


Managed Care And Managed Sentencing — A Tale Of Two Systems, Ronald Weich Nov 1998

Managed Care And Managed Sentencing — A Tale Of Two Systems, Ronald Weich

All Faculty Scholarship

The daily injustices mount. The front line professionals who administer the system cry out for more discretion to depart from the rigid rules that bind them, Congress finally hears their call, and is poised to enact sweeping reforms.

Are improvements in federal sentencing law on the way? Probably not in the near future. But the new Congress will surely take up proposals to regulate the managed health care industry, and the impending debate over a proposed "Patients' Bill of Rights" law offers important lessons for federal sentencing policy.

At first blush, sentencing reform and health care reform have about as ...


A Special Report On The Justice Department Anti-Trust Suit Against The Aba, Lawrence E. Walsh Oct 1976

A Special Report On The Justice Department Anti-Trust Suit Against The Aba, Lawrence E. Walsh

University of Baltimore Law Forum

No abstract provided.